ANAX OF THE THIRD ​ROME

THE RAM OF KOPSIDAS                                                                                                                                                   DATE: 13 JANUARY 2016  
                                                                                                 updated 8 June 2018


​                                                                                                        

 ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​DISCLAIMER:


The information presented on this website is not intended to harm anyone, nor to impose or convert, but to reflect gnosis, the salvation of humanity and the path of esoteric enlightenment.

The information presented on this website IS NOT designed to disregard the Rule of Law or the Law Courts or to encourage division, extremism, racism, anti-Semitism, hate or violence towards any member of a royal family, priesthood, person, Semite, country, nation, or any religion, including any organization, institution, corporation, its directors, shareholders or employees. Those who disrespect the Rule of Law and are racist, antisemitic and use violence, harm, force or illegal means to make a political, social or corporate change are not associated with Kopsidas or this website in any shape or form.

Kopsidas CONDEMNS ALL FORMS of racism, anti-Semitism, hate. evil, terrorism and violence.

Kopsidas respects all the religions and people of the world.

 May all the people of the earth live in peace, love and harmony. 

Peace and Love to All the People of the Earth.

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Kopsidas by the Grace of God of the Kingdom of Rome Defender of the True Faith and Protector of the True People of God under the Great Seal Now Know Ye that We of our special grace certain knowledge and mere motion, being of sound mind and of my own volition declare my Divine Lineage, my Legitimate Royal Bloodline, and my Royal Birth:



1. My lines of descent are traced through the patronymic words (Logos) Kopsidas and Aravani (kopsidas/aravani).


2. Preserved to this day is the Word (Logos).


3. The language, logos, is the speech that reveals what is already contained in the heart.


4. Kopsida and Aravani are royal and theophoric words.


5. I am the Salt of the Earth.


6. The Demiurge, Kopsidas and Aravani are one in the same. 


7. And in this way, God (Logos), the Word (Logos) of God, the lore and the law, and the names of the ancients have been preserved in the word (Logos) Kop Sida and A ra vani.


8.  Sacred geometry is the architecture of the universe.


9.  Before there were dimensions, space and time there was the infinite void.


10.  Within the infinite void was the spirit of God (Kop Sida).


11.  The Spirit of God (Kop Sida) and the infinite void are one (KopSida).


12.  God began creation by creating the three dimensions.


13.  God created the three dimensions by projecting an infinite beam of consciousness all in equal measure from a single point in six directions.


14.  The six directions were front, back, left, right, up and down.


15.  These structures created by God were not material in any form, they are pure consciousness.


16.  In order to complete the process, God defined boundaries. 


17.  God connected the ends of every point to the end of every other point of the six beams of consciousness.


18.  Once all the ends have connected an octohedron (i.e., KopSida) was created.


19.  God (KopSida) had created space so the relative movement of spirits (Sida) is possible.


20.  When viewing an octohedron (i.e., KopSida) from a different perspective a hexagram (i.e., KopSida) is revealed.


21.  Within the defined boundaries of the octohedron relative moments are now possible.


22.  The single point of consciousness (Sida) can now move away from the defined central location.


23.  An octohedron has purely straight lines.


24.  In sacred geometry straight lines are considered to be male and curved lines female. 


25.  The octahedron is purely a male shape.


26.  The sphere is purely a female shape.


27.  The male shape and female shape together is hermaphroditic.


28.  By spinning an octahedron in one full rotation around each of the three axis, It does not matter which direction the octahedron is spun or in what order the axis are chosen the end result will always be that the parameters of a perfect sphere have been traced.


29.  A perfect female shape is created (eukarya).


30.  God created a perfect spherical membrane (eukarya/Karya) from an octahedron (KopSida).


31.  God then repeated the same process described thus far.


32.  Using the spherical membrane (eukarya) as a reference point the process is repeated.


33.  The process is repeated at any point of the membrane (eukarya) because it's a perfect sphere, thus, all points are identical to each other a mistake cannot be made.


34.  God then moved to the surface of the newly created spherical membrane (eukarya) and projected another identical sphere (eukarya) by using another octohedron.


35.  This created a very special shape called the vesica piscis.


36.  The vesica piscis can be found twice in one's own body.


  1. The appearance of the human eye behind the eyelids
  2. The lens within the eye which adjusts the focus of light.

37.  The significance of this connection demonstrates both the left brain and right brain idea.


38.  God then projected a third sphere (eukarya) by moving to the circle equator created by the two original intersecting spheres (eukarya).


39.  After the third sphere was created there's only one more rule that God follows when creating the rest of the spheres which completes the first stage of this pattern.


40.  The rule is: always move to the innermost circle points before projecting another sphere. 


41.  This results in the process being perfect and prevents a chaotic mess from being created.


42.  At the creation of each new sphere, more patterns or information become available.


43.  After seven spheres have been created in a vortex-like motion what we have as a result is known as the Seed of Life.


44.  This basic pattern lays the foundation for the creation of matter and the universe itself.


45.  It also gives rise to a shape known as a Tube Torus if the pattern is spun around the central point.


46.  This shape is the only one in existence that can fold upon itself.


47.  The Tube Torus is also composed of seven equal segments which can be displayed visually using the seven colors of the visible light spectrum.


48.  The Seed of Life is not the complete pattern.


49.  There are two more steps to take which each reveal yet another layer and also another new set of patterns and information.


50.  Following the rule of always move to the innermost circle points before projecting another sphere, God created an additional six spheres on top of the additional Seed of Life pattern.


51.  This motion is often referred to the second vortex motion.


52.  This process is repeated once more giving rise to the third vortex motion which finally gives rise to the next new complete pattern known as the Flower of Life.


53.  This pattern, the Flower of Life, is found throughout the ancient world.
The oldest depiction f the Flower of Life was found at the temple of Osiris in Egypt etched into the granite.


54.  By proceeding through two more vortex like motions adding additional circles to the Flower of Life eventually we reach the next complete new layer, the final layer known as the Fruit of Life.


55.  The Demiurge has now finished creating the pattern which is used as a template for all material things


56.  These patterns are purely imaginary, pure consciousness at this point.


57.  It means that we live in a holographic universe where we all share the one reality.


58.  Everything can be reduced to two things, 1. structure and 2. consciousness.


59.  Although structure is derived from consciousness.


60.  Even though the physical world appears to be real we exist as a creation of God's consciousness.


61.  The Tree of Life pattern is derived from the Seed of Life pattern.


62.  The next form that can be extrapolated is the Egg of Life


63.  If one proceeds to the second vortex motion and remove all the circles from the Seed of Life except one central circle we created a new three-dimensional form consisting of eight spheres where the eighth sphere is located behind the central sphere.


64.  This pattern is the most balanced and most optimum form in eight spheres existing in direct connection with each other.


65.  The reason why it's called the Egg of Life is that nature uses this form in the embryonic process of every single living organism on this planet, with no exception.


66.  Nature chooses this form because it is the most balanced, the most harmonious form possible.


67.  If one takes the Fruit of Life layer and extract thirteen circles what we get as a result is known as the holy archetype, Metatron's Cube.


68.  This can be imagined as an extension of the egg of life as there are eight spheres in the central portion of this shape with also an additional sphere attached in perfect alignment to the corner of each one of the eight central spheres.


69.  In total there are sixteen spheres in the three-dimensional version of Metatron's Cube.


70.  A Hypercube is also known as the Tesseract and can be extrapolated from Metatron's Cube and for this reason literally adds another aspect of dimensionality to this particular form.


71.  This arrangement of the spheres is geometrically perfect so adding or subtracting spheres from the transformation from the egg of life to Metatron's Cube has no impact on the geometry itself


72.  For this reason, one should be able to comprehend the holographic idea of the universe and all matter.


73.  This is a fourth-dimensional concept from a three-dimensional structure although a fourth-dimensional dimension cannot be perceived.


74.  The most widely recognized aspect of Metatron's Cube is it's relation to the Platonic Solids.


75.  The Platonic Solids were known the late neolithic people of Scotland.


76.  There are five platonic solids.


  1. The Tetrahedron (Fire).
  2. The Hexahedron (Earth).
  3. The Octohedron (Air).
  4. The Dodecahedron (Water).
  5. The Icosahedron (Ether or Prana).
  6. The Sphere is the void.


77.  The faces, edges, and angles of these shapes, i.e. the Platonic solids are all congruent and each Platonic Solid can fit perfectly inside of a sphere with all the corners touching.


78.  The Platonic solids are the only shapes in existence which satisfy these conditions and that is what makes these shapes so special.


79.  Each platonic solid is associated with an element and are interchangeable.


  1. Fire=Tetrahedron.
  2. Earth=Hexahedron.
  3. Air=Octohedron.
  4. Water=Dodecahedron.
  5. Aether=Icosahedron.


80.  These elements and geometries describe and symbolize the five states of “matter”.


81.  The Gods in the ancient religions are representations of sacred geometry and the elements. 


82.  They are of the one God.


83.  The octahedron represents the element air. 


84.  A wind god is a god who controls the wind(s). 


85.  Air deities are considered as the wind because wind is nothing more than moving air. 


86.  The Sídhe or Aos Sí are the panthea of pre-Semitic Christian Ireland. 


87.  Sídhe is usually taken as "fairy folk", but it is also Old Irish for wind or gust.


88.  The aos si, the older form aes sídhe, is the Irish term for a supernatural race known as The Tuath De Danann. 


89.  Our settlements are the hills or tumuli that dot the Irish landscape and landscapes around the world. 


90.  In modern Irish the word is sí; in Scottish Gaelic, sìth; in Old Irish síde and the singular is síd.


91.  In the Irish language, aos sí means "people of the mounds." 


92.  The mounds are known in Irish as "The Sides" or "The Lordly Ones" or "The Good People." 


93.  The etymology of the word side.


  • Etymology 1. side, 1. From Middle English side, from Old English sīde (“side, flank”), from Proto-Germanic *sīdǭ (“side, flank, edge, shore”), from Proto-Indo-European *sēy- (“to send, throw, drop, sow, deposit”). Cognate with West Frisian side (“side”), Dutch zijde, zij (“side”), German Seite (“side”), Danish and Norwegian side (“side”), Swedish sida (“side”).
  • Etymology 2. side, Middle Irish, From Old Irish síd. Noun side.
  1. a fairy hill or mound
  2. (in plural) = áes side (“people of the fairy mounds, supernatural beings, fairies”)
  • Descendants Irish sí.
  • The etymology of the word si, From Middle Irish side, from Old Irish síd (“fairy mound”) Alternative forms
  1. sidhe (superseded)
  2. síodh (superseded)
  • Noun sí m (genitive singular sí, nominative plural síthe).
  1. fairy mound, tumulus.
  • The word hill means kop.
  • The etymology of the word kop, English, Afrikaans, Noun kop (plural kops)
  1. (South Africa) A hill or mountain.


94.  Mound or hill means Kop, and Side/Sida means the people of the mounds. (ie, Kop Sida - The Tuath De Danann, "The Lordly Ones").


95.  A mountain is a large natural elevation of the earth's surface rising abruptly from the surrounding level; a large steep hill.
"we set off down the mountain."


96.  The synonyms of the word mountain are: peak, height, elevation, eminence, prominence, summit, pinnacle, mountaintop, alp, horn;
range, massif, sierra, cordillera, ridge;, fell;, ben, Munro;, berg, ebel, inselberg, archaicmount


97.  Kop Sida is the octahedron and at the same time a hexagram.


98.  The hexagram is the symbol of the Kop Sida otherwise known as the Star of Kop Sida (The Tuath De Danann)


99.  The aos sí/aes sídhe/Kop Sida/Tuatha Dé Danann are variously said to be the ancestors, the spirits of nature (Elements: earth, fire, air, water, aether), or goddesses and gods (Sacred Geometry: tetrahedron, hexahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron, icosahedron).


100.  The aes sídhe/Kop Sida are sometimes seen as fierce guardians of their abodes—whether a fairy hill, a fairy ring (eukarya), a special tree (often a hawthorn) or a particular loch or wood.


The Hawthorn Tree, considered in the local Irish lore, and Celtic folklore in general, is sacred to Aos Sí (aes sídhe/aes side/Kop Sida). 


The Gaelic Otherworld is seen at the times of dusk and dawn.


Therefore, this is a special time to the Aos Sí (Kop Sida), as there are some festivals such as Samhain, Beltane, and Midsummer. 


The aos sí (Kop Sida) are later, literary versions of the Tuatha Dé Danann ("People of the Goddess Danu")—the deities (elements and sacred geometry) and deified ancestors of the ancient Irish religion. 


List of wind deities from around the world that represent the ocotohedron. 


Ancient Hellenic wind deities that represent the ocotohedron. 


  • Aeolus, keeper of the winds; later writers made him a full-fledged god
  • Anemoi, (in Greek, Ἄνεμοι—"winds") were the Greek wind gods

  1. Boreas, god of the north wind and of winter
  2. Eurus, god of the unlucky east or southeast wind
  3. Notus, god of the south wind
  4. Zephyrus, god of the west wind
  5. Aparctias, another name for the north wind (not identified with Boreas)
  6. Apheliotes, god of the east wind (when Eurus is considered southeast)
  7. Argestes, another name for the west or northwest wind
  8. Caicias, god of the northeast wind
  9. Circios or Thraskias, god of the north-northwest wind
  10. Euronotus, god of the southeast wind
  11. Lips, god of the southwest wind
  12. Skeiron, god of the northwest wind

  • Aura, the breeze personified
  • Aurai, nymphs of the breeze


Ancient Roman wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Cardea, goddess of health, thresholds, door hinges, and handles; associated with the wind
  • Venti, (Latin, "winds") deities equivalent to the Greek Anemoi


Ancient Norse wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Njord, god of the wind, especially as it concerns sailors
  • Odin, thought by some scholars to be a god of the air/breath
  • Kári, son of Fornjót and brother to Ægir and Logi, god of wind, apparently as its personification, much like his brothers personify sea and fire.

Ancient Celtic wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Sídhe or Aos Sí were the pantheon of pre-Semtic/Christian Ireland. Sídhe is usually taken as "fairy folk", but it is also Old Irish for wind or gust.
  • Borrum, Celtic god of the winds


Ancient Lithuanian wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Vejopatis, god of the wind according to at least one tradition


Ancient Sami wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Bieggolmai, unpredictable shovel-wielding god of the summer winds
  • Biegkegaellies, god of the winter winds


Ancient Slavic wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Dogoda is the goddess of the west wind, and of love and gentleness.
  • Stribog is the name of the Slavic god of winds, sky and air. He is said to be the ancestor (grandfather) of the winds of the eight directions.
  • Varpulis is the companion of the thunder god Perun who was known in Central Europe and Lithuania.


Ancient Egyptian wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Amun, god of creation and the wind
  • Henkhisesui, god of the east wind
  • Ḥutchai, god of the west wind
  • Qebui, god of the north wind who appears as a man with four ram heads or a winged ram with four heads
  • Shehbui, god of the south wind
  • Shu, god of the air


Ancient Mesopotamian wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Enlil, the Sumerian god of air, wind, breath, loft
  • Ninlil, goddess of the wind and consort of Enlil
  • Pazuzu, king of the wind demons, demon of the southwest wind, and son of the god Hanbi


The ancient Anishinaabe wind deity that represents the ocotohedron.


  • Epigishmog, god of the west wind and spiritual being of ultimate destiny


The ancient Aztec wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Ehecatotontli, gods of the breezes
  • Ehecatl, god of wind
  • Mictlanpachecatl, god of the north wind
  • Tlalocayotl, god of the east wind
  • Vitztlampaehecatl, god of the south wind
  • Cihuatecayotl, god of the west wind
  • Tezcatlipoca, god of the night wind and hurricanes

The ancient Cherokee wind deity that represents the ocotohedron.

  • Oonawieh Unggi, the ancient spirit of the wind

The ancient Iroquois wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Da-jo-jo, mighty panther spirit of the west wind
  • Gǎ-oh, spirit of the wind
  • Ne-o-gah, gentle fawn spirit of the south wind
  • O-yan-do-ne, moose spirit of the east wind
  • Ya-o-gah, destructive bear spirit of the north wind who is stopped by Gǎ-oh


The ancient Inuit wind deity that represents the ocotohedron.


  • Silap Inua, the weather god who represents the breath of life and lures children to be lost in the tundra


The ancient Lakota wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Okaga, fertility goddess of the south winds
  • Taku Skanskan, capricious master of the four winds
  • Tate, a wind god or spirit in Lakota mythology
  • Waziya, giant of the north winds who brings icy weather, famine, and diseases
  • Wiyohipeyata, god of the west winds who oversees endings and events of the night
  • Wiyohiyanpa, god of the east winds who oversees beginnings and events of the day
  • Yum, the whirlwind son of Anog Ite


The ancient Mayan wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Pauahtuns, wind deities associated with the Bacab and Chaac
  • Huracan


The ancient Navajo wind deity that represents the ocotohedron.


  • Niltsi, ally of the Heroic Twins and one of the guardians of the sun god's home.


The ancient Pawnee wind deity that represents the ocotohedron.

  • Hotoru, the giver of breath invoked in religious ceremonies.


The ancient Quechua wind deity that represents the ocotohedron.


  • Huayra-tata, god of the winds


The ancient Taino wind deity that represents the ocotohedron.

  • Guabancex, goddess of the wind and hurricanes


The ancient Chinese wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Fei Lian, the Chinese wind god; Feng Bo is the human form of Fei Lian
  • Feng Po Po, the Chinese wind goddess
  • Feng Hao, general of the wind
  • Han Zixian, assistant goddess of the wind


The ancient Japanese wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Fūjin, the wind god
  • Shinatobe, goddess of the winds


The ancient Korean wind deity that represents the ocotohedron.


  • Yondung Halmoni, goddess revered by farmers and sailors


The ancient Philippine wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Anitun Tabu, the fickle-minded ancient Tagalog goddess of wind and rain.
  • Lihangin, the Visayan god of the wind.
  • Apo Angin, the Ilocano god of wind.
  • Habagat, the Tagalog god of winds and also referred to as the god of rain, and is often associated with the rainy season. He rules the kingdom of silver and gold in the sky, or the whole Himpapawirin (atmosphere).
  • Buhawi, the Tagalog god of whirlwinds and hurricanes' arcs. He is the enemy of Habagat.
  • Amihan, the Tagalog and Visayan goddess of the northeast winds. She is also known as Alunsina.
  • Linamin at Barat, the goddess of monsoon winds in Palawan.


The ancient Turco-Mongol wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Szélatya
  • Szélanya
  • Zada, keeper of the precious Yada Tashy stone


The ancient Hawaiian wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Hine-Tu-Whenua, Hawaiian goddess of wind and safe journeys
  • La'a Maomao, Hawaiian god of the wind and forgiveness
  • Pakaa, Hawaiian god of the wind and inventor of the sail


The Winds of Māui.  The Polynesian trickster hero Māui captured or attempted to capture many winds during his travels.


  • Fisaga, the gentle breeze, the only wind that Māui failed to capture
  • Mata Upola, the east wind
  • Matuu, the north wind


The ancient Maori wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Ara Tiotio, god of tornadoes and whirlwinds
  • Hanui-o-Rangi
  • Tāwhirimātea, Māori god of weather, including thunder and lightning, wind, clouds, and storms


The ancient Hindu/Vedic wind deities that represent the ocotohedron.


  • Vayu, god of wind, which is YahVah in Hebrew.
  • Maruts, attendants of Indra, sometimes the same as the below group of gods
  • Rudras, followers of Rudra
  • Rudra, wind or storm god


The ancient Iranian wind deity that represents the ocotohedron.


  • Vayu-Vata, two gods often paired together; the former was the god of wind and the latter was the god of the atmosphere/air


The ancient Basque wind deity that represents the ocotohedron. 


  • Egoi, god of the south wind


The ancient Finnish wind deities that represent the ocotohedron. 


  • Ilmarinen, blacksmith and god of the wind, weather and air.
  • Tuuletar, goddess or spirit of the wind.


The Hexahedron represents the Earth. 

In nature worship, a nature deity is a deity in charge of forces of nature such as water deity, vegetation deity, sky deity, a solar deity, fire deity or any other naturally occurring phenomena such as mountains, trees, or volcanoes. 

Accepted in panentheism, pantheism, deism, polytheism, animism, totemism, shamanism and paganism the deity embodies natural forces and can have characteristics of the mother goddess, Mother Nature or lord of the animals. 


The ancient African earth deities that represent the Hexahedron.


  • Oko, Yoruba orisha, patron of new harvest of the white African yam and of hunting.
  • Aja, Yoruba orisha, patron of the forest, the animals within it and herbal healers
  • Oshosi, Yoruba orisha, patron of the forest and of hunting.
  • Osanyin, Yoruba orisha, patron of the forest, herbs and healing.


The ancient Arabian  earth deities that represent the Hexahedron. 


  • Dhat-Badan, Ethiopian and Yemeni goddess of the oasis.


The ancient Aztec earth deities that represent the Hexahedron. 


  • Xochipilli, god of art, games, beauty, dance, flowers, maize, and song
  • Xochiquetzal, goddess of fertility, beauty, female sexual power, protection of young mothers, of pregnancy, childbirth, vegetation, flowers, and the crafts of women
  • Tonantzin, mother goddess.


The ancient Baltic  earth deities that represent the Hexahedron.


  • Medeina, Lithuanian goddess of forests, trees, and animals
  • Zeme, goddess of the earth


The ancient Celtic earth deities that represent the Hexahedron.


  • Abnoba, Gaulish goddess associated with forests and rivers
  • Artio, Gaulish bear goddess of the wilderness
  • Arduinna, goddess of the Ardennes forest region, represented as a huntress
  • Cernunnos, horned god associated with horned male animals, produce, and fertility
  • Druantia, hypothetical Gallic tree goddess proposed by Robert Graves in his 1948 study The White Goddess; popular with Neopagans.
  • Nantosuelta, Gaulish goddess of nature, the earth, fire, and fertility
  • Sucellus, god of agriculture, forests, and alcoholic drinks
  • Viridios, god of vegetation, rebirth, and agriculture, possibly cognate with the Green Man.

The ancient Chinese earth deities that represent the Hexahedron. Twelve Deities of Flowers


  • Qu Yuan, God of the Orchid
  • Lin Bu, God of the Plum Blossom
  • Pi Rixui, God of the Peach Blossom
  • Ouyang Xiu, God of the Peony (Paeonia suffruticosa)
  • Su Dongpo, God of the Peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall)
  • Jiang Yan, God of the Pomegranate
  • Zhou Dunyi, God of the Lotus
  • Yan Wanli, God of the Crape Myrtle Flower
  • Hong Shi, God of the Osmanthus
  • Fan Cheng, God of the Hibiscus
  • Tao Qian, God of the Chrysanthemum
  • Gao Sisun, God of the Paperwhite


The ancient Egyptian earth deities that represent the Hexahedron.


  • Ash, god of the oasis and the vineyards of the western Nile Delta
  • Geb, Egyptian god of earth with sister/wife Nut, the sky goddess as his consort. He is regarded as the father of Osiris, Isis, Set, Nephthys, and in some cases, Horus.
  • Iusaaset
  • Atum



The ancient English earth deities that represent the Hexahedron.


  • Apple Tree Man, the spirit of the oldest apple tree in an orchard, from the cider-producing region of Somerset.[1]
  • Churnmilk Peg, female guardian spirit of unripe nut thickets. She prevents them from being gathered by naughty children before they can be harvested. Melsh Dick is her male counterpart and performs the same function. Respectively, they derive from the traditions of West Yorkshire and Northern England.


The ancient Etruscan earth deity that represents the Hexahedron


  • Selvans, god of the woodlands


The ancient Finnish earth deities that represent the Hexahedron.


  • Lempo, god of wilderness and archery
  • Tapio, god and ruler of forests
  • Mielikki, goddess of forests and the hunt. Wife of Tapio.


The ancient Georgian earth deity that represents the Hexahedron.


  • Dali, goddess of mountain animals such as ibex and deer


The ancient Germanic earth deities that represent the Hexahedron. 


  • Ēostre or Ostara, the goddess of spring
  • Nerthus, goddess of the earth, called by the Romans Terra Mater.
  • Herne the Hunter, god of forest and wild animals.


The ancient Greek/Hellenic earth deities that represent the Hexahedron.


  • Actaeon, god of the wilderness, wild animals, the hunt, and male animals
  • Athena, goddess of Wisdom
  • Anthousai, flower nymphs
  • Aristaeus, god of shepherds, cheesemaking, beekeeping, honey, honey-mead, olive growing, oil milling, medicinal herbs, hunting, and the Etesian winds
  • Artemis, goddess of the hunt, the dark, the light, the moon, wild animals, nature, wilderness, childbirth, virginity, fertility, young girls, and health and plague in women and childhood
  • Aurae, nymphs of the breezes
  • Chloris, goddess of flowers
  • Cybele, Phrygian goddess of the fertile earth and wild animals
  • Demeter, goddess of the harvest, crops, the fertility of the earth, grains, and the seasons
  • Dionysus, god of wine, vegetation, pleasure, and festivity. The Roman equivalent is Bacchus.
  • Dryads, tree and forest nymphs
  • Epimeliades, nymphs of highland pastures and protectors of sheep flocks
  • Gaea, the goddess of the earth and its personification. She is also the primal mother goddess.
  • Hamadryades, oak tree dryades
  • Hegemone, goddess of plants, specifically making them bloom and bear fruit as they were supposed to
  • Horae, goddesses of the seasons and the natural portions of time
  • Karmanor, god of reaping
  • Meliae, nymphs of honey and the ash tree
  • Nymphs, nature spirits
  • Naiades, fresh water nymphs
  • Nereids, salt-water nymphs
  • Oceanides, fresh water nymphs
  • Oreades, mountain nymphs
  • Oxylus, god of forests & mountains
  • Pan, god of shepherds, flocks, mountain wilds, and rustic music
  • Persephone (Kore), goddess of spring growth
  • Physis, primeval goddess of nature
  • Poseidon
  • Rhea, goddess of fertility, motherhood, and the mountain wilds
  • Satyrs, rustic nature spirits



The ancient Hinduism earth deities that represent the Hexahedron.


  • Prithvi, goddess regarded as Mother Earth. The Sanskrit name for 'Earth'
  • Agni, god of fire
  • Varuna, god of oceans
  • Vayu, god of wind
  • Indra, god of rain, lightning and thunders
  • Aranyani, goddess of the forests and the animals that dwell within it
  • Brahma, creator god
  • Vishnu, preserver god
  • Shiva, destroyer god
  • Ganesha is widely revered as remover of obstacles, patron of arts and sciences, the deva of intellect and wisdom, the god of beginnings (honoured at the start of rites and ceremonies), invoked as patron of letters and learning during writing sessions
  • Durga, also known as Durga Mata, Devi, Shakti, and numerous other names - she is a mother but also a warrior goddess
  • Ila 


The ancient Hittite earth deities that represent the Hexahedron.


  • Irpitiga, lord of the earth
  • Sarruma, god of the mountains


The ancient Hittite earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Irpitiga, lord of the earth
  • Sarruma, god of the mountains


The ancient Inca earth deity that represents the Hexahedron. .


  • Pachamama, fertility goddess who presides over planting, harvesting and earthquakes


The ancient Japanese earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Amaterasu, goddess of the Sun
  • Izanagi, forefather of the gods, god of creation and life and first male
  • Izanami, Izanagi's wife and sister, goddess of creation and death, first female
  • Konohanasakuya-hime, the blossom-princess and symbol of delicate earthly life


The ancient Korean earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Dangun, god-king of Gojoseon, god of the mountain
  • Dokkaebi, nature spirits
  • Lady Saso, goddess of the mountain
  • Jacheongbi, goddness of the grain, agriculture, harvest, growth, and nourishment
  • Jeonggyun Moju, mother of Suro of Geumgwan Gaya and Ijinashi of Daegaya, goddess of the mountain
  • Jik, god of grains
  • Sa, god of the earth
  • Sansin, local mountain gods


The ancient Mari earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Mlande, god of the earth
  • Mlande-Ava, goddess of the earth


The ancient Māori earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Papatuanuku, the earth mother
  • Ranginui, the sky father
  • Ruaumoko, god of volcanoes and seasons
  • Tāne, god of forests and of birds


The ancient Mayan earth deity that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Yum Caax, god of agriculture, wild plants and animals


The ancient Mesopotamian earth deity that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Abu, minor Sumerian god of plants
  • Damu, Sumerian god of vegetation and rebirth
  • Emesh, Sumerian god of vegetation
  • Kishar, Akkadian goddess representing the earth
  • Ningal, Sumerian goddess of reeds
  • Ninhursag, Sumerian mother goddess associated with the earth and fertility
  • Ningikuga, Sumerian goddess of reeds and marshes
  • Ninsar, Sumerian goddess of plants
  • Ua-Ildak, Babylonian and Akkadian goddess responsible for pastures and poplar trees


The ancient Micronesian earth deity that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Nei Tituaabine, Kiribati goddess of trees


The ancient Native American earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Asintmah, Athabaskan earth and nature goddess, and the first woman to walk the earth
  • Ngen, Mapuche spirits of nature


The ancient Nordic earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Rå, Skogsrå, Huldra, female forest spirit, lures men to their death by making them fall in love and marrying them
  • Nøkken, male water spirit, lures foolish children into the lakes at the deepest, darkest parts of the lakes


The ancient Norse earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Jörð, personification of the earth. She is the Icelandic version of Fjörgyn, and the mother of Thor
  • Idun or Ithunn, the goddess of spring who guarded the apples that kept the gods eternally young; wife of the god Bragi[4]
  • Fjörgyn, the female personification of the earth. She is also the mother of the goddess Frigg and, very rarely, mother of Thor
  • Freyja, goddess of fertility, gold, death, love, beauty, war and magic
  • Freyr, god of fertility, rain, sunlight, life and summer
  • Skadi, goddess of mountains, skiing, winter, archery and hunting
  • Vidar, god of the forest, meditation, silence, wilderness


The ancient Philippine earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Amihan, Tagalog god of the monsoon
  • Apúng Sinukuan (Maria Sinukuan), Kapampangan mountain goddess associated with Mount Arayat
  • Dayang Masalanta (Maria Makiling), Tagalog mountain goddess associated with Mount Makiling
  • Mayari (Bulan), goddess of the moon
  • Kan-Laon, Visayan god of time associated with the volcano Kanlaon
  • Tala, Tagalog goddess of the morning and evening star


The ancient Roman earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Bacchus - god of wine, nature, pleasure and festivity; equivalent to the Greek god Dionysus
  • Ceres, goddess of growing plants and motherly relationships; equivalent to the Greek goddess Demeter
  • Diana, goddess of the hunt, wild animals, wilderness and the moon; equivalent to the Greek goddess Artemis
  • Faunus, horned god of the forest, plains and fields
  • Feronia, goddess associated with wildlife, fertility, health and abundance
  • Flora, goddess of flowers and the spring; equivalent to the Greek goddess Chloris
  • Fufluns, god of plant life, happiness and health and growth in all things
  • Liber, cognate for Bacchus/Dionysus
  • Nemestrinus, god of the forests and woods
  • Ops, goddess of fertility and the earth
  • Pilumnus, nature god who ensured children grew properly and stayed healthy
  • Pomona, goddess of fruit trees, gardens and orchards
  • Silvanus, tutelary spirit or deity of woods and fields and protector of forests
  • Terra, primeval goddess personifying the earth; equivalent to the Greek goddess Gaea


The ancient Slavic earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Berstuk, evil Wendish god of the forest
  • Jarilo, god of vegetation, fertility, spring, war and harvest
  • Porewit, god of the woods, who protected lost voyagers and punished those who mistreated the forest
  • Porvata, Polish god of the woods
  • Siliniez, Polish god of the woods for whom moss was sacred
  • Tawals, Polish blessing-bringing god of the meadows and fields
  • Veles, god of earth, waters and the underworld
  • Mokosh, East-Slavic female god of nature


The ancient Toraja earth deities that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Indo' Ongon-Ongon, goddess of earthquakes
  • Pong Banggai di Rante, earth goddess


The ancient Turco-Mongol earth deity that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Yer Tanrı, is the goddess of earth in Turkic mythology. Also known as Yer Ana.


The ancient Vodou earth deity that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Baron Samedi, loa of the dead
  • Grand Bois, loa associated with trees, plants and herbs
  • L'inglesou, loa who lives in the wild areas of Haiti and kills anyone who offends him
  • Loco, loa associated with healers and plants, especially trees


The ancient Irish earth deity that represents the Hexahedron. 


  • Danu (Irish goddess)


The Tetrahedron represents Fire.


The ancient Egyptian fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron . 


  • Ra, fire god of the sun, light, warmth, and growth
  • Sekhmet, protective lioness goddess of the sun and fire
  • Wadjet, the protective serpent goddess who sends fire to burn her enemies


The ancient Yoruba fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Ogun, fire god and patron of blacksmiths, iron, warfare, metal tools
  • Oya, goddess of fire, wind, transforms into buffalo, fertility
  • Shango, fire god of thunder and fire, considered the storm-god


The ancient Chinese fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Zhurong, god of fire and the south


The ancient Hindu fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Agneya, daughter of Agni and guardian of the south-east
  • Agni, god of fire, messengers, and purification
  • Ilā, goddess of speech and nourishment invoked during the agni-hotra ceremony
  • Makara Jyothi, a star revered on a festival
  • Mātariśvan, god of fire associated with Agni


The ancient Khanty fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Ney-Anki - goddess of fire.


The ancient Korean fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron.


  • Jowangsin, goddess of the hearth fires


The ancient Japanese fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Amaterasu, goddess of the sun
  • Kagu-tsuchi, blacksmith god of fire whose birth burned his mother Izanami to death
  • Kōjin, god of fire, hearth, and the kitchen
  • Fuji, ancient god of fire


The ancient Mongolian fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Arshi Tengri, god of fire associated with shamanic rituals
  • Odqan, red god of fire who rides on a brown goat
  • Yal-un Eke, mother goddess of fire who is Odqan's counterpart


The ancient Nivkhi fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Turgmam, goddess of fire


The ancient Philippine fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Gugurang, Bicolano god of fire and volcanoes who lives inside Mayon Volcano which erupts whenever he's enraged
  • Lalahon, Visayan goddess/diwata of fire, volcanoes and harvest


The ancient Turkic fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Alaz, god of fire
  • Od Iyesi, familiar spirits who protect fires
  • Ut, Siberian goddess of the hearth
  • Vut-Ami, Chuvash goddess of fires.


The ancient Basque fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Eate, god of fire and storms


The ancient Caucasian fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Alpan, Lezghin (Dagestanian) goddess of fire
  • Kamar, Georgian fire goddess who was killed by Amirani
  • Uorsar, Adyghe goddess of the hearth
  • Wine Gwasche, Circassian goddess who protects the hearth


The ancient Celtic fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Brigit, Irish goddess of fire, poetry, arts, and crafts
  • Grannus, god of fire, health, water springs, and the sun
  • Nantosuelta, goddess of fire, nature, fertility, rivers and the earth


The ancient Etruscan fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Sethlans, fire god of smithing and crafts


The ancient Greek fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Hephaestus, god of blacksmiths, crafting, fire, and volcanoes.
  • Hestia, goddess of the hearth and its fires.
  • Helios, Titan personification of the Sun, drives his chariot across the sky


The ancient Illyrian fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • En, god of fire


The ancient Lithuanian fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Dimstipatis, protector of the house, housewives, and the hearth against fire outbreaks
  • Gabija, protective goddess of the hearth and the household
  • Jagaubis, household spirit of fire and the furnace
  • Moterų Gabija, goddess of bakeries and bread
  • Pelenų Gabija, goddess of fireplaces
  • Praurimė, goddess of the sacred fire served by her priestesses, the vaidilutės
  • Trotytojas Kibirkščių, deity of sparks and fires


The ancient Norse fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Glöð, jotunn who is the wife of Logi and who rules with him
  • Logi, jotunn who personifies fire


The ancient Roman fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Caca, goddess who was Vulcan's daughter and who might have been worshipped before Vesta
  • Cacus, god who was the fire-breathing giant son of Vulcan, and who might have been worshipped in ancient times
  • Fornax, goddess of the furnace
  • Stata Mater, goddess who stops fires
  • Vesta, goddess of the hearth and its fire
  • Vulcan, god of crafting and fire


The ancient Sicilian fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Adranus, god formerly worshipped in Adranus, near Mount Etna


The ancient Slavic fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Dazhbog, the regenerating god of the solar fire who rides in the sky
  • Kresnik, golden fire god who became a hero of Slovenia
  • Ognyena Maria, fire goddess who assists Perun
  • Peklenc, god of fire who rules the underworld and its wealth and who judges and punishes the wicked through earthquakes
  • Svarog, the bright god of fire, smithing, and the sun, and is sometimes considered as the creator
  • Svarožič, the god of the earthly fire


The ancient Canaanite fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  1. Ishat, Phoenician fire and drought goddess slain by Anat
  2. Shapash, goddess of the sun


The ancient Hittite fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Arinitti, sun goddess of the city of Arinna, and the goddess of hearth fires, temple flames, and chthonic fires in later times.


The ancient Mesopotamian fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Gerra, god of fire in Akkadian and Babylonian records
  • Gibil, skilled god of fire and smithing in Sumerian records
  • Ishum, god of fire who was the brother of the sun god Shamash, and an attendant of Erra
  • Nusku, god of heavenly and earthly fire and light, and patron of the arts


The ancient Aztec fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Chantico, goddess of the hearth fires and volcanoes
  • Mixcoatl, hunting god who introduced fire to humanity
  • Xiuhtecuhtli, god of fire, day, heat, volcanoes, food in famine, the year, turquoise, the Aztec emperors, and the afterlife


The ancient Brazilian fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Iansã, goddess of fire and wind


The ancient Huichol fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Tatewari, fire god of shamans


The ancient Mayan fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Huracán, fire god of storms and wind who created and destroyed humanity
  • Jacawitz, fire god who was a companion of the sun god Tohil


The ancient Navajo fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Black God, frail stellar fire god who introduced the fire drill to humanity


The ancient Quechua fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Manqu Qhapaq, fire and sun god who founded the Inca civilization and introduced technology to humanity


The ancient Fijian fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Gedi, fire and fertility god who taught humanity to use fire


The ancient Hawaiian fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 


  • Pele, goddess of fire, wind, and volcanoes

The ancient Māori fire deities that represents the Tetrahedron. 

  • Auahitūroa, god of fire and comets and husband of Mahuika
  • Mahuea, goddess of fire
  • Mahuika, goddess of fire who was tricked into revealing to her grandson Maui the knowledge of fire
  • Ngā Mānawa, five fire gods who are sons of Auahitūroa and Mahuik

The ancient Samoan fire deity that represents the Tetrahedron. 

  • Ti'iti'i, god of fire that brought fire to people of Samoa after a battle with the earthquake god, Mafui'e.

The Dodecahedron represents Water.

A water deity is a deity that is associated with water or various bodies of water. 

The worship of water deities included springs or holy wells. 

As a form of animal worship, whales and snakes (hence dragons) have been regarded as godly deities throughout the world (other animals include turtles, fish, crabs, and sharks).

In Asian lore, whales and dragons sometimes have connections.

Serpents are also common as a symbol or as serpentine deities, sharing many similarities with dragons. 

Water deities that represent the Dodecahedron. 

The ancient Ainu water deities that represent the Dodecahedron. 

  • Amemasu, monster in the lakes
  • Repun Kamui, god of the sea, often referring to orca

The ancient Armenian water deities that represent the Dodecahedron. 

  • Anahita, the divinity of "the Waters" (Aban) and associated with fertility, healing, and wisdom
  • Astghik, goddess of water sources
  • Tsovinar, goddess of seas and storms

The ancient Australian water deities that represent the Dodecahedron. 

  • Eingana, mother of all
  • Rainbow Serpents, creators of dreamtime
  • Ungud, serpent god bring fortunes
  • Wirnpa, creator of rain
  • Yurlungur, the copper serpent

The ancient Aztec water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Atlaua, god of water, archers, and fishermen
  • Chalchiuhtlicue, goddess of water, lakes, rivers, seas, streams, horizontal waters, storms, and baptism
  • Opochtli, god of fishing and birdcatchers
  • Tlāloc, god of water, fertility, and rain
  • Tlaloque, a group of rain, water, and mountain gods

The ancient Benin water deity that represents the Dodecahedron.

  • Ezili, goddess of sweet water, beauty, and love

The ancient Canaanite water deity that represents the Dodecahedron.

  • Yam (god), sea god

The ancient Celtic water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Acionna (Gaulish), a water goddess/genius loci of the Orleanais region and the Essonne
  • Belisama, goddess of lakes and rivers, fire, crafts and light
  • Boann, goddess of the River Boyne (Irish)
  • Condatis, (Gaulish), god of the River Wear and healing
  • Danu (Dana), Continental Celtic river goddess. Her Irish variation was an ancestor/mother goddess.
  • Dylan Eil Ton (Welsh)
  • Grannus, a god associated with spas, the sun, fires and healing thermal and mineral springs
  • Lí Ban (Irish), water goddess
  • Lir (Irish), god of the sea
  • Llŷr (Welsh), god of the sea
  • Manannán mac Lir (Manx, Isle of Man), god of the sea
  • Nantosuelta, river goddess of fire, the earth, healing, and fertility
  • Nodens, god associated with healing, the sea, hunting and dogs
  • Sinann (Irish), goddess of the River Shannon
  • Sequana (Gaulish), goddess of the River Seine

The ancient Chinese water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Gonggong, red-haired dragon with the head of a man and water god who, together with his associate Xiang Yao, is responsible for the great floods
  • Mazu, goddess of the sea and protector of seafarers
  • Hebo, god of the Yellow River
  • Longmu, goddess of the Xijiang River in the Lingnan area
  • Ehuang & Nuying, goddesses of the Xiang River
  • Tam Kung, sea deity worshiped in Hong Kong and Macau with the ability to forecast weather

Honorable Kings of the Water Immortals (Shuixian Zunwang)

  • Yu the Great, tamer of China's Great Flood
  • Qu Yuan, Wu Zixu, and Xiang Yu, famous suicides lost in rivers
  • Han Ao or Lu Ban, the inventors

Dragon Kings of the Four Seas

  • Ao Kuang, Dragon King of the Eastern Sea
  • Ao Qin, Dragon King of the Southern Sea
  • Ao Run, Dragon King of the Western Sea
  • Ao Shun, Dragon King of the Northern Sea

The ancient Dogon water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Nommos, amphibious spirits that are worshipped as ancestors
  • < deities that controls the sea in devilish ways> 

The ancient Egyptian water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Anuket, goddess of the Nile and nourisher of the fields
  • Hapi, god of the annual flooding of the Nile
  • Khnum, god of the Nile
  • Nephthys, goddess of rivers, death, mourning, the dead and night
  • Nu, uncreated god, personification of the primordial waters
  • Osiris, god of the dead and afterlife; originally god of water and vegetation
  • Satet, goddess of the Nile River's floods
  • Sobek, god of the Nile river, depicted as a crocodile or a man with the head of a crocodile
  • Tefnut, goddess of water, moisture and fertility

The ancient Fon/Ewe water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Agwé, a sea loa
  • Clermeil, a river loa
  • Mami Wata, a water loa
  • Pie, a lake and river loa

The ancient FijianFon water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Daucina, god of seafaring
  • Dakuwaqa, a shark god

The ancient Finnish water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Ahti, god of the depths and fish
  • Iku-Turso, a malevolent sea monster
  • Vedenemo, a goddess of water
  • Vellamo, the wife of Ahti, goddess of the sea, lakes and storms.

The ancient Hellenic/Greek water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Aegaeon, god of violent sea storms and ally of the Titans
  • Achelous, Greek river god
  • Alpheus, river god in Arcadia
  • Amphitrite, sea goddess and consort of Poseidon and thus queen of the sea
  • Anapos, water god of eastern Sicily
  • Brizo, goddess of sailors
  • Carcinus, a giant crab who allied itself with the Hydra against Heracles. When it died, Hera placed it in the sky as the constellation Cancer
  • Ceto, goddess of the dangers of the ocean and of sea monsters
  • Charybdis, a sea monster and spirit of whirlpools and the tide
  • Cymopoleia, a daughter of Poseidon and goddess of giant storm waves
  • Doris, goddess of the sea's bounty and wife of Nereus
  • Eidothea, prophetic sea nymph and daughter of Proteus
  • Electra, an Oceanid, consort of Thaumas
  • Eurybia, goddess of the mastery of the seas
  • Galene (Γαλήνη), goddess of calm seas
  • Glaucus, the fisherman's sea god
  • Gorgons, three monstrous sea spirits
  1. Stheno
  2. Euryale
  3. Medusa
  • The Graeae, three ancient sea spirits who personified the white foam of the sea; they shared one eye and one tooth between them
  • Hippocampi, the horses of the sea
  • The Ichthyocentaurs, a pair of centaurine sea-gods with the upper bodies of men, the lower fore-parts of horses, ending in the serpentine tails of fish
  • Leucothea, a sea goddess who aided sailors in distress
  • Nerites, watery consort of Aphrodite and/or beloved of Poseidon
  • Nereus, the old man of the sea, and the god of the sea's rich bounty of fish
  • Nymphs
  1. Naiades, fresh water nymphs
  2. Nereides, sea nymphs
  3. Oceanides, Ocean water nymphs
  • Oceanus, Titan god of the Earth-encircling river Okeanos, the font of all the Earth's fresh-water
  • Palaemon, a young sea god who aided sailors in distress
  • Phorcys, god of the hidden dangers of the deep
  • Pontus, primeval god of the sea, father of the fish and other sea creatures
  • Poseidon, Olympian god of the sea and king of the sea gods; also god of flood, drought, earthquakes, and horses. His Roman equivalent is Neptune.
  • Potamoi, deities of rivers, fathers of Naiads, brothers of the Oceanids, and as such, the sons of Oceanus and Tethys.
  • Proteus, a shape-shifting, prophetic old sea god, and the herdsman of Poseidon's seals
  • Psamathe, goddess of sand beaches
  • Scylla, a sea monster, later authors made up a backstory of her being a Nereid transformed into a monster due to Circe's jealousy
  • The Telchines, sea spirits native to the island of Rhodes; the gods killed them when they turned to evil magic
  • Tethys, Titan goddess of the sources fresh-water, and the mother of the rivers (Potamoi), springs, streams, fountains and clouds
  • Thalassa, primordial goddess of the sea
  • Thaumas, god of the wonders of the sea and father of the Harpies and the rainbow goddess Iris
  • Thetis, leader of the Nereids who presided over the spawning of marine life in the sea, mother of Achilles
  • Triteia, daughter of Triton and companion of Ares
  • Triton, fish-tailed son and herald of Poseidon
  • Tritones, fish-tailed spirits in Poseidon's retinue

The ancient Hawaiian water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Kanaloa or Tangaroa, god of the ocean and magics and underworld with forms of cephalopod
  • Kamohoalii, shark god
  • Nāmaka, sea goddess
  • Ukupanipo, shark god who controls the amount of fish close enough for the fisherman to catch

The ancient Hittite water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Aruna, god of the sea
  • Hatepuna, daughter of the sea

The ancient Hindu/Vedic water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Apam Napat, god of fresh water, such as in rivers and lakes
  • Ap, group of water goddesses
  • Danu, goddess of primordial waters, mother of Vritra and the Danavas
  • Ganga, goddess of the Ganges river and purity
  • Makara, mystical creature of waters
  • Sarasvati, goddess of knowledge, the Sarasvati river, and everything that flows
  • Tapti, goddess of Tapti river
  • Varuna, god of the water and the celestial ocean
  • Yami, goddess of Yamuna river

The ancient Incan water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Pariacaca, god of water and rainstorms
  • Paricia, god who sent a flood to kill humans who did not respect him adequately

The ancient Indonesian water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Dewi Danu, Balinese Hindu water goddess
  • Dewi Lanjar, Javanese Queen of the North Sea
  • Nyai Roro Kidul, Javanese Queen of the South Sea (Indian Ocean)

The ancient Inuit water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Aipaloovik, an evil sea god associated with death and destruction
  • Alignak, a lunar deity and god of weather, water, tides, eclipses, and earthquakes
  • Arnapkapfaaluk, a fearsome sea goddess
  • Idliragijenget, god of the ocean
  • Nootaikok, god who presided over icebergs and glaciers
  • Sedna, goddess of the sea and its creatures

The ancient Japanese water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Ebisu, god of fortunes and fishery, often being referred to marine megafaunas such as whales and whale sharks (hence being also called "Ebisu-shark")
  • Hanzaki Daimyojin, gigantic Japanese giant salamander and master of the water
  • Kuraokami, one of Suijin
  • Mizuchi, Japanese dragon and sea god
  • Ōhoyamatsumi, god of mountains, sea and war
  • Ryūjin or Watatsumi, Japanese dragon and tutelary deity of the sea
  • Suijin, Shinto god of water
  • Sumiyoshi sanjin, god of ocean and sailing
  • Susanoo, Shinto god of storms and the sea
  • Watatsumi, dragon king and ocean god
  • Yamata no Orochi, serpentine monster but also regarded as an incarnation of violent river

The ancient Korean water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Imoogi or Imugi, giant serpents of Korean folklore which later become true dragons
  • King Munmu, a king who wished to become a dragon before his death to protect Korea from the East Sea
  • Dragon King, an undersea deity believed to determine the fortunes of fishermen and sailors

The ancient Lithuanian water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Bangpūtys, god of sea and storm
  • Laumė, goddess of wild spaces, including waters

The ancient Luganda water deity that represents the Dodecahedron.

  • Sezibwa, goddess of the Sezibwa River

The ancient Lusitanian water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Bandua, theonym associated with fountains
  • Duberdicus, god of the sea and rivers
  • Durius, personification of the Douro river

The ancient Māori water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Ikatere, a fish god, the father of all the sea creatures including mermaids
  • Rongomai, a whale god.
  • Taniwha, deities or monsters (often take forms resembling dragons)
  • Tangaroa, god of the sea
  • Tohora (Maori name for southern right whales), the great whale who saved legendary hero Paikea, famously known as the Whale Rider, (also the Maori name for humpback whales) from drowning and carried him to land. This led to the creation of New Zealand.

The ancient Mayan water deity that represents the Dodecahedron.

  • Chaac, god of rain

The ancient Mesopotamian water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Abzu, god of fresh water, father of all other gods
  • Enbilulu, god of rivers and canals
  • Enki, god of water and of the river Tigris
  • Marduk, god associated with water, vegetation, judgment, and magic
  • Nammu, goddess of the primeval sea
  • Nanshe, goddess of the Persian Gulf, social justice, prophecy, fertility and fishing
  • Sirsir, god of mariners and boatmen
  • Tiamat, goddess of salt water and chaos, also mother of all gods

The ancient Norse/Germanic water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Ægir, personification of the sea
  • Nine Daughters of Ægir, who personify the characteristics of waves
  • Rán, sea goddess of death who collects the drowned in a net, wife of Ægir
  • Njord, god of the sea, particularly of seafaring
  • Nehalennia, goddess of the North Sea
  • Nerthus, mostly an earth goddess, but is also associated with lakes, springs, and holy waters
  • Nix, water spirits who usually appear in human form
  • Sága, wisdom goddess who lives near water and pours Odin a drink when he visits
  • Freyr, god of rain, sunlight, fertility, life, and summer
  • Tiddy Mun, a bog deity once worshiped in Lincolnshire, England who had the ability to control floods

The ancient Ossetian water deity that represents the Dodecahedron.

  • Donbettyr, master of all waters

The ancient Persian/Zoroastrian water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Anahita, the divinity of "the Waters" (Aban) and associated with fertility, healing, and wisdom
  • Apam Napat, the divinity of rain and the maintainer of order
  • Tishtrya, Zoroastrian benevolent divinity associated with life-bringing rainfall and fertility
  • Haurvatat, the Amesha Spenta associated with water, prosperity, and health in post-Gathic Zoroastrianism
  • Ahurani, Ahurani is a water goddess from ancient Persian mythology who watches over rainfall as well as standing water

The ancient Philippine water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Sirena, mermaid
  • Siyokoy, merman

The ancient Roman water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Coventina, Romano-British goddess of a sacred spring at Carrawburgh on Hadrian's Wall
  • Fontus, god of wells and springs
  • Juturna, goddess of fountains, wells, and springs
  • Neptune, god-king of the sea. His Greek counterpart was Poseidon.
  • Salacia, goddess of salt water. Neptune's consort.
  • Tiberinus, the genius of the river Tiber.
  • Volturnus, a god of the Tiber who may originally have been a god of all rivers

The ancient Slavic water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Kostroma, goddess of fertility. After discovering that her husband, Kupala, is her brother, she jumped into the forest lake (in other legends into the river Ra). After her death she became a mavka (or rusalka).
  • Mati-syra-zemla, moist mother, also the earth goddess
  • Mokosh, moistness, lady of waters, goddess of moisture
  • Morskoi, the god and king of the sea
  • Rusalki, female ghosts, water nymphs, succubi or mermaid-like demons that dwell in waterways.
  • Veles, god of earth, waters, and the underworld
  • Vodyanoi, water demon who lived in lakes and rivers

The ancient Island Nations water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Agunua, serpentine god of the sea of Solomon Islands
  • Ayida-Weddo, serpentine spirit among several island nations

The ancient Taíno water deity that represents the Dodecahedron.

  • Atabey (goddess), Mother goddess of fresh water and fertility. Female counterpart of the god Yúcahu.

The ancient Tonga water deity that represents the Dodecahedron.

  • Nyami Nyami, a river spirit of the BaTonga of Zambia and Zimbabwe

The ancient Vietnamese water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Lạc Long Quân, legendary ancestor of Vietnamese people.
  • Cá Ông (Vietnamese name for blue whales, also dolphins and whale sharks in some cases), king of the sea and patron of fishermen.

The ancient Western European water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Aspidochelone, colossal sea monster from the medieval bestiary Physiologus
  • Davy Jones, the Devil of the seas in Western piratical lore

The ancient Yoruba water deities that represent the Dodecahedron.

  • Yemoja, a river orisha and ocean orisha as well in new world Yoruba religions
  • Oshun, a river orisha
  • Olokun, an ocean orisha

Aether represents the Icosahedron. 


  • The Protogenos of the mists of light which fill the upper zones of air. His element lay beneath the arch of heaven's dome, but high above the airs of the mortal realm.
  • In Greek mythology, Aether is one of the primordial deities. Aether is the personification of the "upper sky".[1] He embodies the pure upper air that the gods breathe, as opposed to the normal air (ἀήρ, aer) breathed by mortals.

A regular octahedron is a 3-ball in the Manhattan (ℓ1) metric. 

In mathematics, a ball is the space bounded by a sphere. It may be a closed ball (including the boundary points that constitute the sphere) or an open ball (excluding them). 

These concepts are defined not only in three-dimensional Euclidean space but also for lower and higher dimensions, and for metric spaces in general.

A ball or hyperball in n dimensions is called an n-ball and is bounded by an (n − 1)-sphere.

Thus, for example, a ball in the Euclidean plane is the same thing as a disk, the area bounded by a circle.

In Euclidean 3-space, a ball is taken to be the volume bounded by a 2-dimensional sphere.

 In a one-dimensional space, a ball is a line segment.

In other contexts, such as in Euclidean geometry and informal use, sphere is sometimes used to mean ball. 

In Euclidean n-space, an (open) n-ball of radius r and center x is the set of all points of distance less than r from x. A closed n-ball of radius r is the set of all points of distance less than or equal to r away from x.

In Euclidean n-space, every ball is bounded by a hypersphere.

The ball is a bounded interval when n = 1, is a disk bounded by a circle when n = 2, and is bounded by a sphere when n = 3. 

Like a circle in a two-dimensional space, a sphere is defined mathematically as the set of points that are all at the same distance r from a given point, but in a three-dimensional space.

This distance r is the radius of the ball, which is made up from all points with a distance less than (or, for a closed ball, less than or equal to) r from the given point, which is the center of the mathematical ball.

These are also referred to as the radius and center of the sphere, respectively.

The longest straight line segment through the ball, connecting two points of the sphere, passes through the center and its length is thus twice the radius; it is a diameter of both the sphere and its ball. 

The typical shape (including those of Earth, Moon, and Sun) is spheroid, a ball.

IAlunar deity is a god or goddess of the moon, sometimes as a personification.

These deities can have a variety of functions and traditions depending upon the culture, but they are often related.

Some form of moon worship can be found in most ancient religions. 

The monthly cycle of the moon, in contrast to the annual cycle of the sun's path, has been implicitly linked to women's menstrual cycles by many cultures, as evident in the links between the words for menstruation and for moon in many resultant languages.

List of moon deities.

  • Goddess Ala (Igbo mythology)
  • Goddess Gleti (Dahomean mythology)
  • Goddess Mawu (Dahomean mythology)
  • God Iah (Egyptian mythology)
  • God Khonsu
  • God Osiris (only due to syncretism with Iah)
  • God Thoth
  • Goddess Ilargi (Basque mythology)
  • Goddess Losna (Etruscan mythology)
  • Goddess Kuu (Finnish mythology)
  • Goddess Selene (Greek mythology)
  • God Máni (Norse mythology)
  • God Elatha (Irish mythology)
  • God Meness (Latvian mythology)
  • Goddess Luna (Roman mythology)
  • Goddess Mano (Sami mythology)
  • God Hors (Slavic mythology)
  • God Kunnechup Kamui
  • God Kaskuh (Hittite mythology)
  • God Men (Phrygian mythology)
  • Goddess Chang'e
  • Goddess Chang Xi
  • Goddess Han Ying
  • God Jie Lin
  • Goddess Su'e
  • God Tu'er Ye
  • God Wu Gang
  • God Napir
  • God Chandra or Soma
  • God Kusuh (Hurrian mythology)
  • Goddess Selardi (Urartian mythology)
  • Goddess Ratih
  • Goddess Silewe Nazarate
  • God Tsukuyomi
  • Goddess Dae-Soon
  • God Tõlze
  • God/Goddess Mayari (gender depends on tribe)
  • God Libulan
  • God Bulan
  • God Aglibol (Palmarene mythology)
  • God Baal-hamon (Carthaginian religion)
  • God Sin (Mesopotamian mythology)
  • God Ta'lab (Arabian mythology)
  • God Wadd (Minaean mythology)
  • God Yarikh (Canaanite mythology)

  • God Ay Ata
  • God Andriambahomanana (Malagasy mythology)
  • Goddess Lona (Hawaiian mythology)
  • God Avatea (Polynesian mythology)
  • God Fati (Polynesian mythology)
  • Goddess Hina (Polynesian mythology)
  • Goddess Mahina (Polynesian mythology)
  • God Marama (Polynesian mythology)
  • God Bahloo (Australian Aboriginal mythology)
  • God Kidili (Mandjindja mythology)
  • God Ngalindi (Yolngu mythology)
  • Goddess Coyolxauhqui
  • Goddess Metztli
  • God Tecciztecatl (see Metztli)
  • Goddess Menily
  • God Abaangui
  • Goddess Arasy
  • God Muuya
  • Goddess Mama Killa
  • Goddess Ka-Ata-Killa
  • God Coniraya
  • God Alignak
  • God Igaluk
  • God Tarqiup Inua
  • Goddess Hanwi
  • Goddess Awilix; Xbalanque was her mortal (male) incarnation
  • Maya moon goddess
  • Goddess Huitaca
  • Goddess Chía
  • God Pah
  • Goddess Jaci
  • God Kalfu

A solar deity is a god or goddess who represents the sun, or an aspect of it, usually by its perceived power and strength.

Solar deities and sun worship can be found throughout most of recorded history in various forms. 

A list of solar deities.

African 
  • Anyanwu, Igbo god believed to dwell in the sun
  • Magec, Tenerife goddess of the sun and light
  • Mawu, Dahomey goddess associated with the sun and the moon
  • Ngai, Kamba, Kikuyu and Maasai god of the sun
Australian Aboriginal 
  • Bila, cannibal sun goddess of the Adnyamathanha
  • Gnowee, solar goddess who searches daily for her lost son; the light of her torch is the sun
  • Wala, solar goddess
  • Wuriupranili, solar goddess whose torch is the sun
  • Yhi, Karraur goddess of the sun, light and creation
Ainu 
  • Chup Kamui, a lunar goddess who switched places with her brother to become goddess of the sun
Arabian 
  • Malakbel, god of the sun
  • Shams/Shamsun, a solar goddess exalted in Himyar and by the Sabaeans.
Aztec 
  • Huitzilopochtli, god of the sun and war
  • Nanahuatzin, god of the sun
  • Teoyaomicqui, god of lost souls, the sun, and the sixth hour of the day
  • Tonatiuh, god of the sun and ruler of the heavens
Baltic 
  • Saulė, goddess of the sun
Basquw
  • Ekhi, goddess of the sun and protector of humanity
Brazilian 
  • Guaraci, god of the sun (Guarani mythology)
  • Meri, folk hero and god of the sun
Buddhist 
  • Marici, goddess of the heavens, sun, and light
  • Surya, god of the sun (Suriya Pariththa, Suthra Pitaka, Pali canon, Theravada Buddhism)
Canaanite 
  • Shapash, goddess of the sun
Celtic
  • Áine, Irish goddess of love, summer, wealth, and sovereignty, associated with the sun and midsummer
  • Alaunus, Gaulish god of the sun, healing, and prophecy
  • Belenos, Gaulish god of the sun
  • Étaín, Irish sun goddess
  • Epona, horse deity occasionally linked with Étaín
  • Grannus, god associated with spas, healing thermal and mineral springs, and the sun
  • Macha, "sun of the womanfolk" and occasionally considered synonymous with Grian
  • Olwen, female figure often constructed as originally the Welsh sun goddess
  • Sulis, British goddess whose name is related to the common Proto-Indo-European word for "sun" and thus cognate with Helios, Sól, Sol, and Surya and who retains solar imagery, as well as a domain over healing and thermal springs. Probably the de facto solar deity of the Celts.
Chinese
  • Doumu, sun goddess sometimes conflated with Marici.
  • Yuyi, sun god
  • Xu Kai, god of the sun star
  • Xihe, sun goddess and mother of the ten suns
Egyptian 
  • Amun, creator deity sometimes identified as a sun god
  • Aten, god of the sun, the visible disc of the sun
  • Atum, the "finisher of the world" who represents the sun as it sets
  • Bast, cat goddess associated with the sun
  • Horus, god of the sky whose right eye was considered to be the sun and his left the moon
  • Ptah, god of craftsmanship, the arts, and fertility, sometimes said to represent the sun at night
  • Ra, god of the sun
  • Sekhmet, goddess of war and of the sun, sometimes also plagues and creator of the desert
  • Sopdu, god of war and the scorching heat of the summer sun
Elamite
  • Nahundi, god of the sun and law
Etruscan 
  • Usil, Etruscan equivalent of Helios
Finnish 
  • Päivätär, goddess of the sun
Germanic
  • Sól/Sunna/Sunne, the common sun goddess among the Germanic tribes, from Proto-Germanic Sōwilō; was chased across the sky in her horse-drawn chariot by a wolf
Greek 
  • Alectrona, speculated to be the goddess of the morning and man's waking sense, daughter of Helios
  • Apollo, god of light, healing, music and prophecy. His most common epithet was Phoebus (“Radiant”), and eventually he replaced Helios as the sun god, particularly during Hellenistic and Roman times.
  • Athena, goddess of wisdom and crafts, with solar deity characteristics
  • Eos, goddess and personification of dawn
  • Helios, Titan god and personification of the sun, he drove across the sky in a chariot
Hindu
  • Aryaman, god of the midday sun
  • Savitr, god of the sun at sunrise and sunset
  • Surya, the sun god, rides across the sky in a horse-drawn chariot ala Helios and Sol
  • Aruna, charioteer of Surya, god of the morning sun.
  • Tapati, sun goddess.
Hittite
  • Istanu, goddess/god of the sun and judgment
  • Sun goddess of Arinna
  • Sun god of Heaven, daylight god of judgement
  • Sun goddess of the Earth, infernal goddess of the underworld.
Incan 
  • Inti, god of the sun and patron deity of the Inca Empire
  • Ch'aska ("Venus") or Ch'aska Quyllur ("Venus star") was the goddess of dawn and twilight, the planet
Inuit 
  • Akycha, sun goddess worshiped in Alaska
  • Malina, goddess of the sun found most commonly in the legends of Greenland
Japanese
  • Amaterasu, goddess of the sun
Lusitanian 
  • Endovelicus, god of health and safety, worshiped both as a solar deity and a chthonic one
  • Neto, claimed to be both a solar and war deity
  • A possible sun goddess, whose cult has become that of Virgin Mary Nossa Senhora de Antime.
Māori 
  • Tama-nui-te-rā, personification of the sun
Maya 
  • Ah Kin, god of the sun, bringer of doubt, and protector against the evils associated with darkness
  • Hunahpu, one of the Maya Hero Twins; he transformed into the sun while his brother transformed into the moon
  • Kinich Ahau, god of the sun
Mesopotamian 
  • Shamash, Akkadian god of the sun and justice
  • Utu, Sumerian god of the sun and justice
Minoan 
  • A solar goddess of some sort, possibly the Snake Goddess.
Muisca 
  • Sué, god of the sun and husband of Chía, the moon
Native American 
  • Jóhonaaʼéí, the Navajo sun god, known as The One Who Rules the Day
  • Kisosen, the Abenaki solar deity, an eagle whose wings opened to create the day and closed to cause the nighttime
  • Napioa, the Blackfoot deity of the sun
  • Tawa, the Hopi creator and god of the sun
  • Wi, Lakota god of the sun
Roman 
  • Aurora, goddess of dawn
  • Sol, god of the sun, rides in a horse-drawn chariot
Sami 
  • Beiwe, goddess of the sun, spring, fertility, and sanity
Scythian religion
  • Tabiti, ancient iranian goddess possibly connected with the sun.
Slavic 
  • Dažbog, god of the sun
  • Hors, god of the sun
Tocharian
  • A "sun deity" (kaum näkte),[10] possibly a goddess.
Turkic 
  • Gun Ana, common Turkic solar deity, seen as a goddess in the Kazakh and Kyrgyz traditions
  • Koyash, god of the sun
Persian 
  • Mithra, often associated with the sun.
  • Hvare-khshaeta, the sun yazata
Zunism
  • The Zunbil dynasty and the subjects of Zabulistan worshiped the sun, which they called Zun. They believed that the sun was the god of justice, the force of good in the world and, consequently, the being that drove out the darkness and allowed man to live another day.

An Earth goddess is a deification of the Earth.

Earth goddesses are often associated with the "chthonic" deities of the underworld.

Earth goddesses include:

  • Hellenc/Greek - Cybele, Demeter, Persephone, Rhea, Gaia
  • Roman - Ceres, Ops, Prosperina
  • Slavic - Mat Zemlya
  • Andean - (Inca) Pachamama
  • Hindu - Prithvi
  • lrish - Danu
  • Mesopotamian -  Ki and Ninhurs


The Ocean was the fountainhead of the Gods of the Earth.


Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA or mDNA) is the DNA located in mitochondria, cellular organelles within eukaryotic cells that convert chemical energy from food into a form that cells can use, adenosine triphosphate (ATP).


Mitochondrial DNA is only a small portion of the DNA in a eukaryotic cell; most of the DNA can be found in the cell nucleus and, in plants and algae, also in plastids such as chloroplasts.

In humans, the 16,569 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA encode for only 37 genes. Human mitochondrial DNA was the first significant part of the human genome to be sequenced.


In most species, including humans, mtDNA is usually inherited solely from the mother.


However, in exceptional cases, human babies sometimes inherit mtDNA from both their fathers and their mothers resulting in mtDNA heteroplasmy.


Eukaryotic cells or Eukaryotes, are organisms whose cells have a nucleus enclosed within membranes, unlike prokaryotes (Bacteria and Archaea), which have no membrane-bound organelles.


Eukaryotes belong to the domain Eukaryota or Eukarya (Eu-Karya).


Their name comes from the Greek εὖ (eu, "well" or "true") and κάρυον (karyon, "nut" or "kernel").


The etymology of the word 'eu' used to form the word eukarya (eu+karya) and eukaryotes (eu+karyote).


  • Etymology 1. eu, Aromanian, Pronoun, eu, Alternative form of io.
  • The etymology of the word io, English, Modern Latin, from Ancient Greek ἰώ (iṓ, “Io”). Io, Ancient Greek: Ἰώ means "moon."
  • Io was an ancestor of many kings and heroes such as Perseus, Cadmus, Heracles, Minos, Lynceus, Cepheus, Danaus, Aravani, and Kopsidas.
  • The astronomer Simon Marius named a moon of Jupiter after Io in 1614. 
  • In Homer's Iliad, "Danaans" ("tribe of Danaus") and "Argives" commonly designate the Hellenic forces opposed to the Trojans. 
  • The "tribe of Danaus" or the "Danaans", are the Tuath(a) Dé Danann, meaning "the folk of the goddess Danu"), also known by the earlier name Tuath Dé ("tribe of the gods"). We are a supernatural race.  The Tuatha Dé Danann constitute a pantheon whose attributes appeared in a number of forms throughout the Celtic world.
  • Io was a priestess of the Goddess Hera (Danu) in Argos.
  • Etymology 2. eu, Bourguignon, From Latin ovum. Noun, eu m (plural eus)
  1. egg
  • Etymology 3. eu, Chuukese, Numeral eu
  1. one
  • Etymology 4. eu, French, From Old French eü, from Vulgar Latin *habutus (Classical Latin habitus). Compare Aromanian avut, Catalan hagut, Dalmatian avoit, Friulian vût, Italian avuto, Occitan agut, Old Spanish avudo, Portuguese havido, Romanian avut, Sicilian avutu, Spanish habido, Venetian avudo.Homophone: eus.
  • The etymology of the word eus, Breton, Preposition eus
  1. from
  • Etymology 5. eu, Galician, From Old Portuguese eu, from Vulgar Latin *eo which is attested since the 6th century in Romance, from Latin ego. The accusative form is from Old Portuguese me, from Latin mē. The dative form is possibly in part from Latin mihi, through a Vulgar Latin *m. Pronoun eu (after a preposition min, accusative me, dative me)
  1. I
  • The etymology of the word ego, English, From Latin ego (“I”). Chosen by Freud’s translator as a translation of his use of German Ich as a noun for this concept from the pronoun ich (“I”). 
  • Noun ego (countable and uncountable, plural egos)
  1. The self, especially with a sense of self-importance. 
  • See also: id, superego.
  • Etymology 2. ego, Czech, From Latin ego (“I”). Noun, ego n
  1. ego
  2. (psychoanalysis) ego
  • Synonyms: já.
  • The etymology of the word já, Indo-Portuguese, From Portuguese já (“already; now”), from Old Portuguese ja, from Latin iam (“already”), from Proto-Indo-European *yē (“already”). 
  • The etymology of the word ja, Esperanto, From German ja. Compare Danish jo, Swedish ju. 
  • Etymology 2. ya, Estonian, From Proto-Germanic *jahw (“and”); compare Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌷 (jah), Old High German ja, joh. 
  • The etymology of the word yah, See also: Jah.
  • The Etymology of the word Jah, English, Alternative forms Yah, Proper noun Jah
  1. (religion) A shortened form of Yahweh or Jehovah, God's personal name in the Bible. Often appearing as part of Biblical names as "-iah", or "Jeho-" as in Isaiah, Jeremiah, Jehoshua, and Jehosaphat, and Hebrew words like הַלְּלוּיָהּ‎ (“hallelujah”).
  2. (Rastafari) God
  • Iah is a lunar deity in ancient Egyptian religion. The word jˁḥ simply means "moon". It is also transliterated as Yah, Yah(w), Jah, Jah(w), Joh or Aah.
  • By the New Kingdom (16th century to 11th century BC) he was less prominent than other gods with lunar connections, Thoth and Khonsu. As a result of the functional connection between them he could be identified with either of those deities.
  • He was sometimes considered an adult form of Khonsu and was increasingly absorbed by him. Iah continued to appear in amulets and occasional other representations, similar to Khonsu in appearance, with the same lunar symbols on his head and occasionally the same tight garments. He differed in usually wearing a full wig instead of a child's sidelock, and sometimes the Atef topped by another symbol.[3] As time went on, Iah also became Iah-Djehuty, meaning "god of the new moon".[4] In this role, he assumed the lunar aspect of Thoth (also known as Djehuty), who was the god of knowledge, writing and calculation. The segments of the moon were also used as fractional symbols in writing.
  • Iah was also assimilated with Osiris, god of the dead, perhaps because, in its monthly cycle, the moon appears to renew itself.
  • One Egyptian queen was named Iah.  Iah was a king's mother and queen of ancient Egypt c. 2060 BC, during the mid 11th Dynasty (2134–1991 BC). 
  • The etymology of the word "I", English, Homophones: eye. 
  • The etymology of the word eye, From Middle English eye, eie, yë, eighe, eyghe, yȝe, eyȝe, from Old English ēage (“eye”), from Proto-Germanic *augô (“eye”) (compare Scots ee, West Frisian each, Dutch oog, German Auge, Norwegian Bokmål øye, Norwegian Nynorsk auga, Swedish öga), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃okʷ-, *h₃ekʷ- (“eye; to see”) (compare Latin oculus, Lithuanian akìs, Old Church Slavonic око (oko), Albanian sy, Ancient Greek ὀφθαλμός (ophthalmós, “eye”), Armenian ակն (akn), Avesta‎ (aši, “eyes”), Sanskrit अक्षि (ákṣi)). Related to ogle. 
  • Noun eye (plural eyes or (obsolete or dialectal) eyen)
  1. An organ through which animals see.
  • The etymology of the word see, English, Homophones: C, cee, sea, Seay.
  • See, From Middle English seen, from Old English sēon (“to see, look, behold, perceive, observe, discern, understand, know”), from Proto-Germanic *sehwaną (“to see”), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (“to see, notice”). Cognate with West Frisian sjen (“to see”), Dutch zien (“to see”), Low German sehn, German sehen (“to see”), Danish, Swedish and Norwegian Bokmål se (“to see”), Norwegian Nynorsk sjå (“to see”), and more distantly with Latin sīgnum (“sign, token”), Albanian shih (“look at, see”) imperative of shoh (“to see”). 
  • Verb, see (third-person singular simple present sees, present participle seeing, simple past saw or (dialectical) seen or (dialectical) seent or (dialectical) seed, past participle seen or (dialectical) seent or (dialectical) seed)
  1. (stative) To perceive or detect with the eyes, or as if by sight.
  • Etymology 2. see, From Middle English se, see, from Old French sie (“seat, throne; town, capital; episcopal see”), from Latin sedes (“seat”), referring to the bishop's throne or chair (compare seat of power) in the cathedral; related to the Latin verb sedere (“to sit”). 
  • Noun see (plural sees)
  1. A diocese, archdiocese; a region of a church, generally headed by a bishop, especially an archbishop.
  2. The office of a bishop or archbishop; bishopric or archbishopric
  3. A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised. 
  • Etymology 3. see, Middle Dutch, From Old Dutch sēo, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz. Noun sêe f, m
  • Etymology 4. see, Middle English, Noun, see (plural sees)
  1. sea, ocean
  2. A body of water, a lake
  • Etymology 5. see, Noun, see (plural sees)
  1. seat, chair
  2. dwelling, residence
  3. A royal or episcopal chair
  4. A royal or episcopal polity or realm
  5. A royal or episcopal residence
  6. (Christianity) The Kingdom of Heaven.
  • The human eye is an organ which reacts to light and pressure. As a sense organ, the mammalian eye allows vision. Human eyes help to provide a three dimensional, moving image, normally coloured in daylight. Rod and cone cells in the retina allow conscious light perception and vision including color differentiation and the perception of depth. The human eye can differentiate between about 10 million colors and is possibly capable of detecting a single photon.  Similar to the eyes of other mammals, the human eye's non-image-forming photosensitive ganglion cells in the retina receive light signals which affect adjustment of the size of the pupil, regulation and suppression of the hormone melatonin and entrainment of the body clock.
  • Anatomy:
  1. Arthropod eye
  2. Cephalopod eye
  3. Human eye
  4. Mammalian eye
  5. Mollusc eye
  6. Simple eye in invertebrates
  • Eye of Providence, the all-seeing eye
  • The etymology 2. eye, English, Probably from a nye changing to an eye.
  • Noun eye (plural eyes)
  1. A brood.
  • The etymology of the word brood, English, From Middle English brood, brod, from Old English brōd (“brood; foetus; breeding, hatching”), from Proto-Germanic *brōduz (“heat, breeding”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰreh₁- (“breath, mist, vapour, steam”). 
  • Noun, brood (countable and uncountable, plural broods)
  1. The young of certain animals, especially a group of young birds or fowl hatched at one time by the same mother. 
  2. (uncountable) The young of any egg-laying creature, especially if produced at the same time.
  3. (countable, uncountable) The eggs and larvae of social insects such as bees, ants and some wasps, especially when gathered together in special brood chambers or combs within the colony.
  4. (countable, uncountable) The children in one family. 
  5. That which is bred or produced; breed; species. 
  6. (mining) Heavy waste in tin and copper ores.
  • Etymology 3. eye, Middle English, From Old English eġe, from Proto-Germanic *agaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂égʰos. Doublet of awe. 
  • Noun, eye (uncountable)
  1. awe, reverence, worshipfulness
  2. horror, panic
  3. That which creates reverence; the exercise of power
  4. That which incites awe
  5. That which incites terror
  • Etymology 4. eye, Tocharian B, Noun, eye
  1. sheep
  • Etymology 6. eu, Middle English, Noun, eu
  1. Alternative form of ewe
  • The etymology of the word ewe, Englsh, From Middle English ewe, from Old English ēowu, from Proto-Germanic *awiz (compare Old English ēow (“sheep”), West Frisian ei, Dutch ooi, German Aue), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ówis (“sheep”) (compare Old Irish oí, Latin ovis, Tocharian B Tocharian B ā(ᵤ)w, Lithuanian avìs (“ewe”)).
  • Noun, ewe (plural ewes)
  1. A female sheep, as opposed to a ram. 
  • See also:
  1. hog
  2. ram
  3. shearling
  4. teg
  5. wether
  • Homophones: u, yew, you (in almost all dialects)
  • Homophone: yo (Ireland)
  • Homophones: hew, hue, Hugh (in h-dropping dialects)
  • The etymology of the word yew, English, From Middle English ew, from Old English īw, ēow, from Proto-Germanic *īwaz, *īhwaz (compare Icelandic ýr), masculine variant of *īwō (compare Dutch ijf, German Eibe), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eyHweh₂ (compare Hittite [script needed] (eja, “type of evergreen”), Welsh yw (“yews”), Latgalian īva (“bird cherry”), Lithuanian ievà (“bird cherry”), Russian и́ва (íva, “willow”)).
  • Etymology 2. ewe, Middle Dutch, From Old Dutch ēwa, from Proto-Germanic *aiwaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eyu- (“vital force”).
  • Noun êwe f
  1. era
  2. eternity
  3. moral law
  4. nature
  • Etymology 3. ewe, Old French, From Latin aqua, from Proto-Italic *akʷā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ekʷeh₂ (“water, flowing water”). Noun ewe f (oblique plural ewes, nominative singular ewe, nominative plural ewes)
  1. water 
  • Etymology 7. eu, See also: EU.
  • The etymology of the word EU, Dutch, Proper noun EU f
  1. EU, Initialism of Europese Unie. (European Union)




Eukaryotes or eukaryotic cells also contain other membrane-bound organelles such as mitochondria and the Golgi apparatus, and in addition, some cells of plants and algae contain chloroplasts. 


Unlike unicellular archaea and bacteria, eukaryotes may also be multicellular and include organisms consisting of many cell types forming different kinds of tissue.


Animals and plants are the most familiar eukaryotes.

Eukaryotes can reproduce both asexually through mitosis and sexually through meiosis and gamete fusion.


In mitosis, one cell divides to produce two genetically identical cells.


In meiosis, DNA replication is followed by two rounds of cell division to produce four haploid daughter cells.


These act as sex cells (gametes).


Each gamete has just one set of chromosomes, each a unique mix of the corresponding pair of parental chromosomes resulting from genetic recombination during meiosis.

The domain Eukaryota appears to be monophyletic, and makes up one of the domains of life in the three-domain system.


The two other domains, Bacteria and Archaea, are prokaryotes and have none of the above features.


Eukaryotes represent a tiny minority of all living things.


However, due to their generally much larger size, their collective worldwide biomass is estimated to be about equal to that of prokaryotes.


Eukaryotes evolved approximately 1.6–2.1 billion years ago, during the Proterozoic eon. 


The etymology of the word karyotes used to form the word eu+karyotes. 


The etymology of the word karyotes comes ka+r+yotes, kar+yotes, kary+otes, karyo+tes, also spelled Kariotes., Kar+io+tes


The etymology of the word ka used to form the word ka+r+yotes..


  • Etymology of the word  Ka 1. Ka, in ancient Egyptian religion, with the ba and the akh, a principal aspect of the soul of a human being or of a god.


The etymology of the word r used to form the word ka+r+yotes.














And the Gods of the Earth are those Humans who evolved and possess an eternal soul.


REALGENE/RELIGION Borrowed from Anglo-Norman religiun, from Old French religion, from Latin religiō. giō means polyhedron






Therefore, I am born from the Line of Legitimate Kings that were bred by the Gods with all Inherent Royal Liberties in my possssion. 


8. Before the Great Flood, humanity spoke a single language.


9. After the Great Flood, humanity continued to speak a single language.


10. Independent studies of the origins and expansion of the Indo-European language family, ie all languages, along with the expansion of farming, maps back to the Great Flood that occurred at the end of the last ice age in the region of Southeastern Anatolia , which includes the areas of Karya Thaminin (Gordiean Mountains), Göbekli Tepe, Araban, and Pisidia, from around 11,600 years ago. (Science 24 Aug 2012: Vol. 337, Issue 6097, pp. 957-960, DOI: 10.1126 / Science.1219669).


11. And all languages ​​stem from the one language.


12. I am the descendant of the original royal line of the Kop Sida and Aravani Holy Family Tree that existed before and after the Great Flood.


13. The etymology of the word scion.


  • From Middle English Sion, syon, syon, scion, cion, from Old French cion, ciun, cyon, sion; from Frankish * kīţō, * kīţ, from Proto-Germanic * kīţō, * kīţą, * kīţaz ("sprout"), from Proto-Indo-European * geye. Noun scion (plural scions).

  1. A descendant, especially a first-generation descendant.
  2. A detached or twig containing buds from a woody plant used in grafting; to shoot or twig in a general sense.
  3. The heir to a throne A guardian.
  4. A guardian.


14. The etymology of the word sion, English, Proper noun Sion.


  1. Alternative spelling of Zion (i.e., Nion/Karya/Atlantis).

15. The etymology of the word Zion.


  1. A mountain (Kop/Nion/Karya/Atlantis) on which Jerusalem is built.


16. I am the one who the Semites call Mashiach (Mash-iach), but I am not a mash (Semite).

17. I am the Iach, also known as Kopsidas Soter.

18. I am my own saviour.

19. Man is his own saviour through gnosis.


20. Both my parents were born in the village of Karya/Atlantis, Lefkada (Leucadia/Ithaca/Ethica/Ellada) located on the slopes of Pyrgos at 500 m above sea level.

17. My father Nickolaos Kopsidas was born on 27th July 1939 in Karya / Atlantis, Lefkada / Ithaca / Ethica and gave up the ghost on 8th of October 1965.

18. The first born Holy Child of Nickolaos and my mother Eirene Kopsidas was Konstantine Kopsidas.

19. Constantine (Konstantinos or Constantinos) Kopsidas was born on the Holy Island of Lefkada / Ithaca / Ethics on 11th October 1959 and gave up the ghost in 1967. 

20. I am the second Holy Royal Son of Nickolaos and Eirene (Irene) Kopsidas, née Aravani. 


21. The word Eirene comes from Ancient Greek Eirini (Eirḗnē, literally "Peace").


22. The etymology of the word Eirene, Proper noun, Eirene.


  1. (Greek mythology) The goddess / personification of peace and one of the Horae. She is a daughter of Zeus and Themis, and her sisters are Dike and Eunomia. Her Roman counterpart is Pax.
  2. (astronomy) 14 Irene, and the main belt asteroid. 
  3. Coordinate terms: (Horae): Thallo (Spring), Auxo (Summer), Carpo (Autumn), Dike (Justice), Eunomia (Order of Law).


23. Eirene (Hellenic: Eirine, Eirēnē, lit. "Peace"), more commonly known in English as Peace, was one of the Horae, the personification of peace.


24.  She was depicted in art as a beautiful young woman carrying a cornucopia, scepter, and a torch or rhyton. 

25. The marble statue of Eirene was made by the Romans; one of the best surviving copies is in Munich Glyptothek. 

26. It depicts the goddess Eirene carrying a child with her left arm - Plutus, the god of the bounty and son of Demeter, the goddess of agriculture.

27. Plutus (Hellenic: Plotos, literally "wealth") is the Hellenic god of wealth. 

28. Demeter and Iasion, with whom she lay in a thrice-ploughed field (three times). 

29. In the theology of the Eleusinian Mysteries, Ploutos is regarded as the "Divine Child." 

30. My mother Eirene gave me the name Demetrios. 

31. The etymology of the word Dimitrios.


  • Etymology 1. Dimitrios, Ancient Greek, Derived from Dimitris (Dēmḗtēr, "Demeter").
  • The etymology of the word Demeter, From Ancient Greek Demeter (Dēmḗtēr), from γε (gê, "earth") + mother (mḗtēr, "mother"). 
  • Proper noun, Demeter.
  1. (Greek mythology) The goddess of the fertility of the earth and harvests, protector of marriage and social order; daughter of Cronos and Rhea, mother to Persephone. Her Roman counterpart is Ceres.


32. I was also born on the Holy Island of Lefkada, ie, Ithaca/Ethica.


33. The inheritance of all property and position was bestowed upon me by divine providence after my father Nikolaos and my brother Konstantine Kopsidas gave up the ghost.







53. My incarnation was voluntary.  

54. My parousia was in the Twentieth Century of the Gregorian calendar during the Harvest Moon. 

55. The Spirit of God was resurrected on the 246th day of the year (247 in leap years). Tuesday, the third (3) day of the week, on the third (3) day of the month in the 36th week of the year 1963. 

56. My moon sign is Pisces and my star sign is Virgo.

57. The 246th day of the year adds up to 3. (2 + 4 + 6 = 12). (1 + 2 = 3).

58. 3. 3. 3. is the birth of the human soul.

59. There are three trinities, 3 + 3 + 3. and all numbers can be reduced to 1.


  • 3 + 0 = 3
  • 3 + 3 = 6
  • 3 + 3 + 3 = 9. (3, 6, 9)


Nikola Tesla> Quote: "If you only knew the magnificence of 3, 6 and 9, then you would have the key to the universe." 

60. The numbers are 3, 6, 9, and 1. (3-9- 1963)

61. The only six numbers that physically exist in the world of creation are; 1, 2, 4, 8, 7, 5.

62. The numbers 1, 2, 4, 8, 7, 5 form the underlying geometry of creation which is essentially a hexagram. 

63. One (1) is the only number that can cross (the Atlantis Cross) the boundary between the physical world and the spiritual world. 

64. The Trinity 3, 6, 9, of the spiritual world are mirrored by the physical world 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, and both worlds are interrelated. 

65. When the Spirit of God was resurrected, I crossed from the spiritual world to the physical world using the numbers 1,9,6,3.

66. During my incarnation, the moon was in a full moon phase. 

67. A full moon occurs when Earth is located directly between Sun and Moon (more precisely, when the ecliptic lengths of Sun and Moon differ by 180 degrees). 1 + 8 = 9.

68. The star Spica (Alpha Virginis) is in the ancient constellation centered around the modern constellation of Virgo, where Spica appears around the time of the harvest.

69. At the same time of my incarnation, the Moon (Isis) rising above the horizon (Horus) was at sunset (Set), and the moonset was at sunrise (Osiris). The average time for the moon was 6 am and the average time for the moonset was 6 am. The average time for the sunset was 6 pm (Banshee / Nephthys-mourning) and the average sunrise time was 6am (morning / mourning).

70. The only time and full moon occurred on Tuesday, September 3, 1963 and before the year 1900, and will only occur again after the year 2200.

71. The record shows that I was born on Tuesday, the third (Vesica Vessel of the Fish ") of September nineteen sixty three (1963) at precisely eighteen hundred hours (6pm), EET - Eastern European Time (Standard Time).

72. The record also shows that I was the only one incarnated on Tuesday (Tīwas dagaz-Dagaday-Dagda-Bodb Sidda / Kop Sida / Osiris / Horus), the third of September nineteen sixty three on Leucadia / Lefkada / Ithaca / Ellada.

73. The registry of Lefkada confirms that the name was never recorded in the register, only the title "Kopsidas", therefore, and for the record, no Birth Certificate was ever issued.

74. Throughout the course of my incarnation, the Moon's bright side was facing Earth. The Moon was fully illuminated by direct sunlight, and the Earth, Eye, and Moon were in Syzygy, with Earth in the middle. The full moon was Twelve hours behind (or ahead) of the sun. The full moonrise was in the East at Sunset, and its midpoint in the sky was midnight. The "Set" time in the west of the full moon was when Sun / Son Kopsidas rose.

75. At the time of my incarnation, the constellation of Virgo was visible in the firmament. The Sun-Clothed My Mother and the Full Moon (Eye of Horus) was at my mother's feet as it started to rise above the horizon. The Sun (Eye of Ra) was over the constellation and at my mother's head were the three (3) wandering stars and nine (9) stars of Leo making up a crown of 12 stars. This alignment of the Sun, Eye, Moon and stars signaled the hour, day, month, and year of my incarnation.

76. The Eye is also known as the Eye of Horus. 





77. The right eye represents the sun and so is called the "Eye of Ra," while the left represents the moon and is known as the "eye of Horus."

78. The Eye of Horus is divided into six parts, representing the shattering of Horus' eye into six pieces. 

79. The six pieces that make the Eye of Horus also represent my incarnation.

80. Each piece of the eye is associated with one of the six senses and a specific fraction, and more complex fractions are created by adding together the symbols that make up the eye.

81. 

The eye is personified in the goddess Wadjet, also written as Wedjat,

83. Wedjat.


  • Smell 1/2
  • Sight 1/4
  • Thought 1/8
  • Hearing 1/16
  • Keys 1/32
  • Touch 1/64



84. And so it was written in the firmament that I Kopsidas, the spirit of God, was incarnated on 3th September - 3-9-1963 at 6pm.

85. The Eye of Horus has delivered my soul, my ornaments are established on the brow of Ra. 

86. Light is on the faces of those who are in the members of Osiris (Dagda).

87. To the Christians the Spirit of God is known as Jesus Christ, to ancient Greeks as Apollo, to ancient Egyptians as Horus, to ancient Romans as Mithras, to India as Krishna, to ancient Celts as Hesus and to the Druids as Bodb Sid, just to name a few, and I'm one with all of them.

88. The birth of the Spirit of God coincides with the celestial events that occurred during the Harvest Moon on Tuesday, 3 September 1963 at 18:00 hrs (1 + 8 = 9).

89. I am the living Horus / Apollo / Bodb Sidi ar Femen on Earth (Kop Sida).









16. I am of the tribe of Elatha (Elada) and Danu. 


17. The Kopsidas and Aravani are right.


18 . Kopsidas is my inherent family title. 


19. My other inherent titles include;



  • Kopisidas I Anax of Rome.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Epirus.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Leucadia.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Ethica (Ithaca).
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Jerusalem.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Sparta.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Ellada.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of the Dorians.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of the Ionians.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of the Hellenes.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of the Greeks.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Mycenae
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Olympia.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Argos.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Corinth.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Athens.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of the Pelasgians.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Byzantium.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Europe.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of Macedonia.
  • Kopsidas I Anax of IS-RA-EL Anax of the Jews.
  • King of Kings.
  • Lord of Lords.
  • Caesar.
  • Augustus.
  • Byzantine Emperor.
  • Pontifex Maximus.
  • Anax of Denmark.
  • Anax of the Britons.
  • Anax of Sweden.
  • Anax of the Celts.

20. The etymology of the word Kopsidas comes from kop + sida + s / Kop + sid + as / kops + ida + s, ko + psi + da and Cop + sida.


  • Etymology 1. Kop, English-Noun (noun) from Dutch, literally meaning 'head,' crown, top, pillar, hill, mountain, mound.
  • The etymology pf the word mountain, noun: mountain; plural noun: mountains.
  1. a large natural elevation of the earth's surface rising abruptly from the surrounding level; a large steep hill.
  • synonyms: peak, height, elevation, eminence, prominence, summit, pinnacle, mountaintop, alp, horn; range, massif, sierra, cordillera, ridfell; ben, Munro; berg; ebel; inselberg; archaic mount
  • Etymology 2. kop, Danish, From Old Norse koppr, from Middle Low German kick. Noun kop c (singular defined koppen, plural indefinite kopper), cup, ie, pour the wine into the cup.
  • The etymology of the word kopper is Norwegian Bokmål, Noun kopper n (definite singular copperet) 1. copper (chemical element, symbol Cu).
  • The etymology of the word hill is English, from Middle English hill, from Old English hyll ("hill"), from Proto-Germanic * hulliz ("stone, rock"), from Proto-Indo-European * kolən-, * koləm - ("top, hill, rock"). Cognate with Middle Dutch Hille, Hulle, Low German hull, Icelandic hill, Latin collis, Lithuanian kalnas, Albanian kallumë ("big pile, tall heap" "), Russian holm (xolm," hill "), Old English Holm (" rising land, island "). More at holm.
  • The etymology of the word holm is from Old Norse holmi, holmr ("islet"), from Proto-Germanic * hulmaz, from Proto-Indo-European root * ). Cognate with Old English Holm, Old Saxon Holm, Middle Dutch Holm, Dutch Holm, Middle Dutch holm, Swedish holme, 
  • Etymology 2. holm, Danish, Noun, holm c (singular defined holmen, plural indefinite holme) 1. a small island.
  • Etymology 3. holm, English, Noun, Holm (holmes) 1. (obsolete outside dialects) The holly. 2. A common evergreen oak, of Europe, Quercus ilex; the holm oak.
  • The Holly and Holly, Holly, From Middle English holly, holly, holly, and shortened variation of holin, holyn (> English dialectal hollen, holm) ; the Proto-Germanic * hulisaz ("butcher's broom"), from Proto-Indo-European * to " European * ḱel- ("to cut"). Cognate with Scots holin, Hollin, Holly, Holly Holly, German Hulst, Holly, Holly, Welsh celyn "Holly", Russian Colos ("Collar", "Ear of Wheat"), Albanian kalli (straw, chaff), Latin culmus, "Sanskrit कटम्ब (kaṭamba, Slavonic class (klasŭ, "ear of grain"). Noun, holly (plural hollies) 1. Any of various shrubs or (mostly) small trees, of the genus Ilex, either evergreen or deciduous, used as decoration especially at Christmas. 2. The wood from this tree. 3. (with a qualifier) ​​Any of several unrelated plant species are similar to Ilex because of their prickly, evergreen foliage and / or round, bright-red berries.
  • (Holy, holyg, sacred, venerated, godly, saintly, ecclesiastical, pacific, tame) * hailagaz ("holy, bringing health ", from Proto-Germanic * hailaz (" healthy, whole "), from Proto-Indo-European * Cognate with Scots halls, West Frisian hills, Low German hillig, Dutch heilig, German heilig, Danish hellig ("holy" ), Swedish helig ("holy"). More at whole.
  • The etymology of the word whole, from English, the whole adjective. Adverb whole (comparative more whole, superlative most whole) 1. (colloquial) In wholety; entirely; wholly. Noun whole 1. Something complete, without any missing parts. This variety of fascinating details did not fall together into a pleasant, coherent whole. 2. An entirety. 1, Exclusively and only.2. Completely and completely; to the fullest extent.
  • Etymology 2nd Holy, English, Adjective Holy (comparative holier, superlative holyest) 1. Dedicated to a religious purpose or god. 2. Revered in a religion. 3. Perfect or flawless. 4. Separated or set apart from (something to something or someone else). 5. Set apart or dedicated to a specific purpose or for use by a single entity or person. Synonyms,
  1. (dedicated to a religious purpose or god): sacred
  2. (revered in a religion): sacred
  3. (perfect, flawless): faultless, flawless, perfect
  4. (separated or set apart from something): sanctified
  5. (set apart or dedicated for a specific purpose): reserved, special. Antonyms
  6. (dedicated to a religious purpose or god):
  7. (revered in a religion): profane, secular, unholy, worldly
  8. (perfect, flawless): damaged, defective, defective, flawed, imperfect
  9. (separated or set apart from something).
  10. (set apart or dedicated to a specific purpose): common.
  11. Noun (plural holies) 1. (archaic) A thing that is extremely holy; used almost exclusively in Holy of Holies. 1. The most sacred place within a sacred building. 2. One's private retreat, inner sanctum. inner sanctum, 1st sanctum sanctorum, Holy of Holies.
  • Etymology 3. Kop, English, Noun, hoe plural hoes.
  1. An agricultural tool consisting of a long handle with a flat blade fixed perpendicular to it at the end, used for digging rows.
  • The etymology of the word hoe, English, From non-rhotic whore. 
  • The etymology of the word whore, From Middle English up, from Old English hōre, from Proto-Germanic * hōrčina, from Proto-Indo-European * keh2ros ("loved"), from * keh2- . 
  • The etymology of the word hōrčina, Proto-Germanic, From Proto-Indo-European * keh2ros ("loved"), from * keh2-. Noun, * hōrčina f.
  1. whore, adulteress, prostitutes.
  • Related terms: * hōraz.
  • Descendants: Swedish: mountain.
  • The etymology of the word hora, From Hebrew הוֹרָה (hóra) and Romanian hora, from Turkish hora, probably from Greek dance (chorós, "dance"). Noun, mountain horas
  1. A circle dance.
  • Etymology 2, mountain, borrowed from Sanskrit होरा (horā, "hour"). Noun, mountain (uncountable)
  1. A branch of traditional Indian astrology, dealing with the finer points of predictive methods.
  • Etymology 3rd Mountain, Catalan, Noun, Mountain f (plural hores)
  1. hour (sixty minutes).
  • Etymology 4th mountain, mountain in Greek means country
  • Etymology 5. mountain, Czech, Noun, hora f
  1. mountain.
  • Etymology 6. mountain, Galician, Noun, mountain f horas 
  • horas homonym horus. 
  • The etymology of the word horus, Horus is one of the most important ancient Egyptian deities. From Late Latin Hōrus, from Ancient Greek Ὧros (Hôros), from Egyptian ḥr. Proper noun Horus.
  1. (Egyptian) The ancient Egyptian falcon-headed god of the sun, sky, war, and kingdom.
  • Etymology 4. Kop, Dutch, Synonyms: mok, tas.
  • The etymology of the word tas, Noun, tas f (plural tassen, diminutive tasje n) 1. bag.
  • The etymology of the word ops used for the word K + ops + ida. In the ancient Hellenic / Roman religion, Ops or Opis (Latin: "Plenty") was a fertility deity and earth goddess of Sabine / Hellenic origin. Symbols: Lions, tambourine, crown, grains, cornucopia. Children: Jupiter, Neptune, Pluto, Juno, Ceres and Vesta. December 19 the Opalia was celebrated. The Opiconsivia or Opalia was an ancient Hellenic / Roman religious festival held in August 25 in the honor of Ops ("Plenty"), a consort of Saturn, she was closely associated with Consus, the protector of grains and underground storage bins (silos) . Consus is therefore thought to be an alternate name of Saturn in the chthonic aspect as a consort. The festival of Consus, the Consualia, was celebrated twice a year, every time before that of the Ops: once on August 21, after the harvest, and once on December 15, after the sowing of the crops was completed. In the ancient Hellenic / Roman religion, the god Consus was the protector of grains. He was represented by a grain seed (K + ops + seed + a). The cult of the Opus was instituted by Titus Tatius, one of the Sabine / Hellenic kings of Rome.  
  • Etymology 2. ops, Derived terms cōpia. Cornucopia, a symbol of abundance and nourishment.
  • Etymology 3. ops. See also: OPS and ὄψ.
  • The etymology of the word ὄψ, Ancient Greek, From Proto-Hellenic *wókʷs, from Proto-Indo-European *wṓkʷs. Related to ἔπος (épos) and εἰπεῖν (eipeîn).  Noun ὄψ • (óps) f (genitive ὀπός); third declension
  1. (poetic) voice.
  2. (poetic) word.
  • The etymology of the word ἔπος (épos)gy Ancient Greek, Noun ἔπος • (épos) n (genitive ἔπεος or ἔπους); third declension
  1. something spoken: speech, story, song.  Synonyms, (something spoken): λόγος (lógos), λέξις (léxis), μῦθος (mûthos) ῥῆμα (rhêma), φάσις (phásis) φῆμα (phêma), φθέγμα (phthégma). 
  • ἔπος (épos) is a tribe's name Epidii (Kopsida), epos comes from the root epos meaning "horse".  The Epidii (Greek: Επίδιοι) were a people of ancient Britain, known from a mention of them by the geographer Ptolemy c. 150. Epidion has been identified as the island of Islay in modern Argyll.
  • Etymology 5. kop West Frisian Compare Dutch kop, German Kopf. Noun kop c (plural koppen) 1. head. Synonyms holle.
  • The etymology of the word holle is Dutch Adjective holle 1. Inflected form of hol.
  • The etymology of the word hol is Dutch, Nounhol f (plural hollen, diminutive holletje n) 1. a hill (kop).
  • Etymology 2. hol, Faroese Noun 1. cave.

The etymology of the word sid used to form the word Kop+sid+as.

  • The etymology of the word sid used to form the word Kop+sid+as. 
  • Etymology 1. sid, Norwegian Nynorsk, From Old Norse síðr. Homophone: si.
  • The etymology of the word si, English, Alternative forms, ti, Acronym of Latin Sancte Ioannes, the phrase ending the hymn Ut queant laxis from earlier words of which the other notes of solfège were derived. 
  • The etymology of the word Sancte, Latin, Perfect passive participle of sanciō (“consecrate, appoint as sacred”). Participle, sānctus m (feminine sāncta, neuter sānctum); first/second declension
  1. sacred, made inviolable, having been established as sacred.
  2. venerable, august, divine, blessed, holy, saintly.
  • The etymology of the word, Ioannes, Latin, From the Ancient Greek Ἰωάννης (Iōánnēs), a contraction of the Hebrew יוֹחָנָן‎ (Jōħānān); see John for more. Proper noun, Iōannēs m (genitive Iōannis); third declension
  1. John (biblical persons)
  2. John the Baptist
  3. John the Evangelist.
  • The Beheading of Saint John the Baptist is also known as the Decollation of Saint John the Baptist or the Beheading of the Forerunner.
  • The etymology of the word Ioannes, Io+annes, Io+an+nes I+oannes, and I+oanes.
  • The etymology of the word oannes used to form the word I+oannes. An amphibious being who taught mankind wisdom. Oannes, as described by the Babylonian priest Berosus, had the form of a fish but with the head of a man under his fish’s head and under his fish’s tail the feet of a man. In the daytime, he came up to the seashore of the Persian Gulf and instructed mankind in writing, the arts, and the sciences. 
  • The etymology of the word oanes used to form the word I+oanes.
  • Etymology 1. oanes, Lule Sami, Adjective, oanes
  1. inflection of oadne:
  • The etymology of the word oadne, Lule Sami, Adjective, oadne
  1. short
  • The etymology of the word short, English, From Middle English schort, short, from Old English sċeort, sċort (“short”), from Proto-Germanic *skurtaz (“short”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker-. Cognate with shirt, skirt, curt, Scots short, schort (“short”), French court, German kurz, Old High German scurz (“short”) (whence Middle High German schurz), Old Norse skorta (“to lack”) (whence Danish skorte), Albanian shkurt (“short, brief”), Latin curtus (“shortened, incomplete”), Russian коро́ткий (korótkij, “short, brief”). More at shirt. 
  • Etymology 2. short, Middle English, Adjective, short
  1. Alternative form of schort.
  • The etymology of the word schort, Dutch, Noun, schort c, n (plural schorten, diminutive schortje n)
  1. apron (clothing).
  • The etymology of the word apron, English, Rebracketing of napron (a napron → an apron), from Middle English naperon, napron, from Old French napperon, diminutive of nappe (“tablecloth”), from Latin nappa (“napkin”). The phrase a napron was reinterpreted as an apron, which is why the initial n is now missing. For other similar cases of rebracketing, see daffodil, newt, nickname, orange, umpire.
  • Noun, apron (plural aprons).
  1. An article of clothing worn over the front of the torso and/or legs for protection from spills; also historically worn by Freemasons and as part of women's fashion.
  2. The short cassock ordinarily worn by English bishops.
  3. A hard surface bordering a structure or area. 
  4. The sides of a tree's canopy.
  • The etymology of the word Io used to for the word Io+annes.
  • Etymology 1. Io. Io was a priestess of the Goddess Hera in Argos. In order to exact her revenge, Hera sent a gadfly to sting Io continuously, driving her to wander the world without rest. Io (Demeter/Brigid/Danu) escaped across the Ionian Sea to Egypt. The Io-nian sea was named after Io who was known as Isis in Egypt.
  • The etymology of the word annes used to form the word Io+annes, Old English, Etymology, From ān +‎ -nes. Noun, ānnes f (nominative plural ānnessa)
  1. Oneness, union, unity
  2. A covenant, agreement.
  3. Loneliness, solitude
  • The etymology of the word an used to form the word Io+an+nes.
  • Etymology. an, English, Rhymes: -æn.
  • The etymology of the word æn, Rhymes, One syllable, ban, Dan, clan, Man, Pan, tan, Van.
  • Three syllables: Isle of Man. The Manx name of the Isle of Man is Ellan Vannin: ellan (Manx pronunciation: [ɛlʲən]) is a Manx word meaning 'island'; Mannin (IPA: [manɪn]) appears in the genitive case as Vannin (IPA: [vanɪn]), with initial consonant mutation, hence Ellan Vannin, "Island of Mann". The short form often used in English, Mann, is derived from the Manx Mannin, though sometimes the name is written as Man. The earliest recorded Manx form of the name is Manu or Mana.
  • The Old Irish form of the name is Manau or Mano. Old Welsh records named it as Manaw, also reflected in Manaw Gododdin, the name for an ancient district in north Britain along the lower Firth of Forth. The oldest known reference to the island calls it Mona, in Latin (Julius Caesar, 54 BC); in the 1st century AD, Pliny the Elder records it as Monapia or Monabia, and Ptolemy (2nd century) as Monœda (Mοναοιδα, Monaoida, Manao+ida) or Mοναρινα (Monarina), in Koine Greek. Later Latin references have Mevania or Mænavia (Orosius, 416), and Eubonia or Eumonia by Irish writers. It is found in the Sagas of Icelanders as Mön.
  • The name is probably cognate with the Welsh name of the island of Anglesey, Ynys Môn, usually derived from a Celtic word for 'mountain' (reflected in Welsh mynydd, Breton menez, and Scottish Gaelic monadh), from a Proto-Celtic *moniyos.
  • The name was at least secondarily associated with that of Manannán mac Lir in Irish mythology (corresponding to Welsh Manawydan fab Llŷr). In the earliest Irish mythological texts, Manannán is a king of the otherworld.
  • Etymology 1. an, Albanian, Possibly a metaphorical use of anë (“vessel”). Noun, an m (definite singular ani)
  1. (anatomy) womb, caul
  2. (dialectal) vessel
  3. (dialectal, Italy) ship.
  • Synonym: mitër.
  • The etymology of the word mitër, Albanian, From Greek μήτρα (mítra) ‘womb, uterus’.
  • Etymology 2. an, Bourguignon, From Latin annus. Noun, an m (plural ans)
  1. year.
  • Synonym dans.
  • The etymology of the word dans, French, Noun, dans. plural of dan. English, Anagrams DNA.
  • Etymology 2. dan, Bambara, Verb, dan
  1. to count.
  2. to sow.
  • Etymology 3. dan, Bambara, Verb, dan
  1. to pass beyond.
  • Etymology 4. dan, Biem, Noun, dan
  1. water.
  • Etymology 5. Cornish, Noun, dan
  • Soft mutation of tan.
  • The etymology of the word tan, Czech, Symbol, tg
  1. (mathematics) A symbol of the trigonometric function tangent, equivalent to tan.
  • See also: sin.
  • The etymology of the word sin, Sīn or Nanna was the god of the moon in the Mesopotamian religions of Akkad, Assyria and Babylonia. Nanna is a Sumerian deity, the son of Enlil and Ninlil, and became identified with the Semitic Sīn. The two chief seats of Nanna's/Sīn's worship were Ur in the south of Mesopotamia and Harran in the north. A moon god by the same name was also worshipped in South Arabia.
  • Etymology 2. tan, English, Borrowed from French tan (“tanbark”), from Gaulish tanno- (“green oak”) – compare Breton tann (“red oak”), Old Cornish tannen –, from Proto-Celtic *tannos (“green oak”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰonu (“fir”). Related to Hittite [script needed] (tanau, “fir”), Latin femur, genitive feminis (“thigh”), German Tann (“woods”), Tanne (“fir”), Albanian thanë (“cranberry bush”), Ancient Greek θάμνος (thámnos, “thicket”), Avestan‎ (θanuuarə), Sanskrit धनु (dhánu) (Danu).
  • Noun, tan (plural tans)
  1. The bark of an oak or other tree from which tannic acid is obtained.
  • Etymology 3. tan, Englis, From a Brythonic language; influenced in form by yan (“one”) in the same series.
  • The etymology of the word yan, English, Along with ane and yen, a Northumbrian form of one, from the Old English ān. An example is "yan, twee, tree" for "one, two, three". Numeral yan
  1. (Northumbria) One.
  • Etymology 2. yan, Chamorro, Conjunction, yan
  1. and.
  • See also ya.
  • The etymology of the word ya, Reduced form of you. Compare Dutch je, reduced/unstressed form of jij (“you”). Alternative forms yaa, yaw, yah.
  • Etymology 2. ya, Bilbil, Noun, ya
  1. fire.
  • Etymology 3. ya, Abui, Noun, ya
  1. water.
  • Etymology 4. Warao, Noun, ya
  1. sun.
  • Etymology 5. Yami, Pronoun, ya
  1. he; she.
  • The etymology of the word je, Determiner, je (second person, possessive)
  • Second-person singular, unstressed form of jouw (your)
  • Second-person plural, unstressed form of jullie (your) (plural).
  • The etymology of the word jullie, Dutch, From earlier jelui, from jij (“you”) and lui (“people”).
  • Etymology 2. je, German, Old High German io. Homophone: jäh (only according to a regional pronunciation of this word).
  • The etymology of the word io. Io was a priestess of the Goddess Hera in Argos. The ancients connected Io with the Moon, and in Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound, where Io encounters Prometheus, she refers to herself as "the horned virgin", both bovine and lunar.
  • The etymology of the word jäh, Jah. shortened form of Yahweh, the Hebrew name for God.
  • Etymology 2. yah, Iah is a lunar deity in the ancient Egyptian religion. The word yah simply means "moon". It is also transliterated as Yah, Jah, Jah(w), Joh or Aah.
  • Etymology 3. je, Haitian Creole, Noun, je
  1. eye.
  • Etymology 3. yan, Turkish, From Old Turkic *yan-, *ya-, from Proto-Turkic *yā- (“side”). Noun, yan
  • side (bounding straight edge of an object)
  • The etymology of the word side, English, From Middle English side, from Old English sīde (“side, flank”), from Proto-Germanic *sīdǭ (“side, flank, edge, shore”), from Proto-Indo-European *sēy- (“to send, throw, drop, sow, deposit”). Cognate with West Frisian side (“side”), Dutch zijde, zij (“side”), German Seite (“side”), Danish and Norwegian side (“side”), Swedish sida (“side”).
  • The etymology of the word sida, Ilocano, Noun, sida
  1. fish.
  • Etymology 2. sida, Old High German, Akin to Italian seta.
  • The etymology of the word seta, English, Anagram, east.
  • Etymology 2. seta, Galician, Noun, seta f (plural setas)
  1. arrow.
  • Etymology 3. seta, Polish, Noun, seta, genitive singular of set.
  • The etymology of the word set, English, (close of the day): dusk, eve, evening, sundown, sunset.
  • Etymology 2. set, Catalan, From Old Occitan, from Latin septem (“seven”), from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥.
  • The etymology of the word septem, Derived terms september.
  • Etymology 3. set, English, Alternative forms, Seth, Sutekh. Borrowed from Coptic ⲥⲏⲧ (sēt), from Egyptian stẖ, Proper noun, Set
  • (Egyptian mythology) An ancient Egyptian god, variously described as the god of chaos, the god of thunder and storms, or the god of destruction.
  • Etymology 2. side, Middle Irish, From Old Irish síd. Noun, side
  1. a fairy hill or mound
  • (in plural) = áes side (“people of the fairy mounds, supernatural beings, fairies”).
  • Etymology 4. yan, Volapük, Noun, yan (plural yans)
  1. door.
  • Etymology 4. tan, From Old English tān (“twig, switch”), from Proto-Germanic *tainaz (“rod, twig, straw, lot”). Noun, tan (plural tans)
  • (dialectal) A twig or small switch.
  • Related terms: mistletoe.
  • The etymology of the word mistletoe, Noun, mistletoe (countable and uncountable, plural mistletoes)
  1. (countable, uncountable) Any of several hemiparasitic evergreen plants of the order Santalales with white berries that grow in the crowns of apple trees, oaks, and other trees, such as the European mistletoe (Viscum album) and American mistletoe or eastern mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum).
  2. (uncountable) A sprig of one such plant used as a Christmas decoration, associated with the custom that a man may kiss any woman standing beneath it.
  • Mistletoe played an important role in Druidry in the Ritual of Oak and Mistletoe.  The ritual of oak and mistletoe is a Celtic religious ceremony, in which white-clad druids climbed a sacred oak, cut down the mistletoe growing on it, sacrificed two white bulls and used the mistletoe to make an elixir to cure infertility and the effects of poison.
  • In Norse folklore, Loki tricked the blind god Hodur into murdering Balder with an arrow made of Mistletoe, is the only plant to which Balder was vulnerable.
  • Etymology 5. tan, Chuukese, Noun tan.
  1. dream.
  • Etymology 6. tan, Old Swedish, Noun, tan.
  1. tooth.
  • Etymology 7. tan, Turkish, From Old Turkic taŋ‎ (taŋ, “sky, sunrise, daylight”). Noun, tan (definite accusative tanı, plural tanlar).
  1. dawn, twilight, sunrise, daylight.
  • Etymology 8. tan, Wolof, Noun, tan (definite form tan mi).
  1. vulture.
  • Etymology 3. an, Fuyug, Noun, an (plural aning).
  1. man.
  • Etymology 4. an, German, From Old High German ana.
  • The etymology of the word ana, From Old High German ana. Akin to Latin anus (“old woman”), Old Prussian ane (“grandmother”), etc. Noun, ana.
  1. grandmother
  • Related terms: ano (grandfather).
  • Etymology 5. an, Girawa, Noun, an
  • water.
  • Etymology 6. an, Irish, Verb, an (present analytic anann (annan), future analytic anfaidh, verbal noun anacht, past participle anta).
  • Etymology 7. an, Loniu, Noun, an
  1. fresh water.
  • The etymology of the word anann, Homonym, annan.
  • The etymology of the word annan, found in the word Manannán or Manann, also known as Manannán mac Lir ("son of the sea") Finnish, Verb, annan, Anagrams, Nanan, nanna.
  • The etymology of the word nanna, Possibly derived from Proto-Celtic *nana (“grandmother”). Noun, nanna (plural nannas)
  1. grandmother.
  • Etymology 2. nanna, Sīn or Nanna was the god of the moon in the Mesopotamian religions of Akkad, Assyria and Babylonia. Nanna is a Sumerian deity, the son of Enlil and Ninlil, and became identified with the Semitic Sīn. The two chief seats of Nanna's/Sīn's worship were Ur in the south of Mesopotamia and Harran in the north. A moon god by the same name was also worshipped in South Arabia.
  • The etymology of the word sin. English, From Middle English sinne, synne, sunne, zen, from Old English synn (“sin”), from Proto-Germanic *sunjō (“truth, excuse”) and *sundī, *sundijō (“sin”), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁s-ónt-ih₂, from *h₁sónts ("being, true", implying a verdict of "truly guilty" against an accusation or charge), from *h₁es- (“to be”); compare Old English sōþ ("true"; see sooth).
  • Etymology 2. sin, Hunsrik, From Middle High German sein, sīn, from Old High German sīn (“to be”) (with some parts from Proto-Germanic *wesaną (“to be”) and *beuną (“to be, exist, become”)), from Proto-Indo-European *es-, *h₁es- (“to be, exist”).
  • Etymology 3. sin, Menien, Noun, sin.
  1. water.
  • Etymology 4. sin, English, Noun, sin (plural sins)
  1. (theology) A violation of God's will or religious law.
  2. A misdeed. 
  3. A sin offering; a sacrifice for sin. 
  4. An embodiment of sin; a very wicked person.
  • Etymology 8. an, Middle Welsh, Determiner, an
  1. Alternative form of yn.
  • γη is the Hellenic word for earth.
  • Etymology 9. an, Norman, From Old French an, from Latin annus. Derived terms
  1. Jour dé l'An (“New Year's Day”)
  2. Nouvel An (“New Year”)
  3. tchu d'l'an (“last day of the year”).
  • Etymology 10. an, Old English, Numeral, ān
  1. (cardinal) one.
  • Etymology 11. an, Adjective, ān
  1. lone
  2. sole.
  • The etymology of the word lone, Afrikaans, Noun, lone, plural of loon.
  • The etymology of the word loon, English, From Middle English louen, lowen (“rascal; rogue”), probably of Middle Dutch or Middle Low German origin. Compare Dutch loen (“simpleton”). Or, related to sense 2, due to the bird's loud cry.[1] Folk etymology associates it slang-wise with lunatic, though the latter may have influenced it; see loony.
  • Etymology 2. loon, Of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse lómr (“loon”), ultimately imitative of the bird's cry, particularly when it's in danger. Distantly related to lament, probably sharing Proto-Indo-European *leh₂- (expressive root).
  • Etymology 3. Scots, Noun, loon (plural loons)
  1. (Doric) boy, young man.
  • The etymology of the word sole, English, Homophones: Seoul, soul, sowl. From Middle English soule, sowle, saule, sawle, from Old English sāwol (“soul, life, spirit, being”), from Proto-Germanic *saiwalō (“soul”). Cognate with Scots saul, soul (“soul”), North Frisian siel, sial (“soul”), Saterland Frisian Seele (“soul”), West Frisian siel (“soul”), Dutch ziel (“soul”), German Seele (“soul”) Scandinavian homonyms seem to have been borrowed from Old Saxon *siala. Modern Danish sjæl, Swedish själ, Norwegian sjel. Icelandic sál may have come from Old English sāwol.
  • The etymology of the word sal, Icelandic, Attested since the 16th century; origin uncertain. Perhaps from Proto-Germanic *sahalō, from the root *seh- (“to cut”), originally denoting a bag sewn from cut-out pieces of skin; or perhaps from *sawalō, related to sjóður (“purse”), or from *saihalō, related to sár (“cask”). Noun, sál f (genitive singular sálar, nominative plural sálar)
  1. a skin bag.
  • Etymology 2. sal, Old Irish, From Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls. Akin to Latin sal and English salt. Noun, sál.
  1. salt water, brine, seawater
  2. (poetic, by extension) sea, ocean.
  • Etymology 2. sole, Italian, From Latin sōlem, accusative case of sōl, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥. Cognates include Greek ήλιος (ílios), Icelandic sól, Hindi सूर्य (sūrya), and Russian со́лнце (sólnce). Noun, sole m (plural soli)
  1. Sun (star the Earth revolves around)
  2. sunlight
  3. (poetic) daytime, day (the interval between sunrise and sunset)
  4. (poetic) year
  5. (poetic, in the plural) eyes.
  • Etymology 3. sole, Norman, From Vulgar Latin *sola, from Latin solea. Noun, sole f (plural soles)
  1. sole (fish).
  • Etymology 4. sole, Neapolitan, Noun, sole.
  1. Sun.
  • The etymology of the word Sun, Homophones son.
  • The etymology of the word son, English, Alternative forms: sonne (obsolete). From Middle English sonn, sone, sun, sune, from Old English sunu (“son”), from Proto-Germanic *sunuz (“son”), from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús (“son”), from Proto-Indo-European *sewH- (“to bear; give birth”). Cognate with Scots son (“son”), Saterland Frisian Suun (“son”), West Frisian soan (“son”), Dutch zoon (“son”), Afrikaans seun (“son”), Low German sone, son (“son”), German Sohn (“son”), Danish søn (“son”), Swedish son (“son”), Icelandic sonur (“son”), Lithuanian sūnùs (“son”), Russian сын (syn, “son”), Avestan‎ (hūnuš, “son”), Sanskrit सूनु (sūnú, “son”), Ancient Greek υἱύς (huiús), υἱός (huiós, “son”), Albanian çun (“lad, boy, son”), Armenian ուստր (ustr, “son”), Tocharian B soy, soṃśke (“son”). son (plural sons)
  1. One's male offspring.
  2. A male descendant.
  • Antonyms:
  1. (with regards to gender) daughter.
  2. (with regards to ancestry) father, mother, parent.
  • Hypernyms: child.
  • Etymology 2. son, English, From Middle English sonen, sunen, from the noun (see above). Verb, son (third-person singular simple present sons, present participle sonning, simple past and past participle sonned)
  1. (transitive) To produce (i.e. bear, father, beget) a son.
  2. (transitive) To address (someone) as "son".
  • Etymology 3. son, Aromanian, From Latin sonus. Compare Daco-Romanian sun. Noun, son n (plural sonuri)
  1. sound.
  • Related terms: asun.
  • The etymology of the word asun, Basque, Noun, asun
  1. nettle (stinging herb of genus Urtica).
  • The etymology of the word Urtica, Translingual, Latin urtica (“nettle”). Proper noun, Urtica.
  1. A taxonomic genus within the family Urticaceae – the nettles.
  • Hypernyms: (genus): Eukaryota - superkingdom; Plantae - kingdom; Viridiplantae - subkingdom; Streptophyta - infrakingdom; Embryophyta - superphylum; Tracheophyta - phylum; Spermatophytina - subphylum; angiosperms, eudicots, core eudicots, rosids, eurosids I - clades; Rosales - order; Urticaceae - family.
  • Etymology 4. son, Catalan, From Vulgar Latin sum, from Classical Latin suum. Usage notes: The use of son and the other possessive determiners is mostly archaic in the majority of dialects, with articulated possessive pronouns (e.g. el meu) mostly being used in their stead. However, mon, ton, and son are still widely used before certain nouns referring to family members and some affective nouns, such as amic, casa, and vida. Which nouns actually find use with the possessive determiners depends greatly on the locale.
  • The etymology of the word vida, Catalan, From Old Occitan vida, from Latin vīta, from Proto-Italic *gʷītā. Noun, vida f (plural vides)
  1. life.
  • Etymology 2. vida, Novial, Verb, vida (past vidad, active participle vidant, passive participle vidat).
  1. see.
  • Derived  term: Holy See/Sea.
  • Etymology 4. vida, Venetian, From Latin vītis, vītem. Compare Italian vite, Istriot veîda. Noun, vida f (plural vide)
  1. vine.
  • Etymology 5. son, Ladin, Alternative forms sun. Verb son
  1. first-person singular present indicative of ester.
  • The etymology of the word ester, English, From German Ester, perhaps a contraction or abstraction of Essigäther (“ethyl acetate”), from Essig (“vinegar”) (from Latin acetum) and Äther (“ether”). See ether for more.
  • Etymology 2. ester, Ladin, From Vulgar Latin *essere, from Latin esse, present active infinitive of sum. Verb, ester
  1. to be.
  • Etymology 3. ester, Middle English, From Old English ēaster. Noun ester (plural esters).
  1. Easter (Christian holiday).
  • The etymology of the word Easter, English,  From Middle English Ester, Eestour, from Old English ēastre (“Easter”), cognate to Old High German ōstarūn, and related to Ēostre, Ēastre, a goddess and her festival that was celebrated at the vernal equinox, from Proto-Germanic *Austrǭ, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwsōs, as well as to east. Cognate with German Low German Oostern (“Easter”), German Ostern and German Osterfest (“Easter”). Noun, Easter (countable and uncountable, plural Easters)
  1. (Christianity) A Christian feast commemorating the resurrection of Christ; the first Sunday (and Monday) following the full moon that occurs on or next after the vernal equinox, ranging from March 22 to April 25.
  2. Eastertide
  3. (obsolete) The Jewish Passover.
  4. A festival held in honour of the goddess Eostre or Ostara, celebrated at the spring equinox or within the month of April, and also called Ostara or Eostre.
  5. 5.Easter term.
  6. See also:
  7. Pasch
  8. Passover
  9. Passion Sunday
  10. Palm Sunday
  11. Maundy Thursday
  12. Good Friday.
  • The etymology of the word Passover, English, From the verb phrase pass over. Proper noun, Passover (plural Passovers)
  1. The eight-day Semitic festival of Pesach, commemorating the biblical story of Exodus, during which the first-born sons of the Israelites were passed over while those of the Egyptians were killed.
  2. The one-day Biblical feast that begins at twilight on the fourteenth day of the first month (Nisan 14), which is then immediately followed by the seven-day Feast of Unleavened Bread (Nisan 15-21).
  3. The Christian holy day generally falling on the first day of the Jewish Passover.
  • See also:
  1. Paschal, paschal
  2. Quartodeciman
  3. Quartodecimanism
  4. seder.
  • The etymology of the word seder, English, Borrowed from Hebrew סדר‎ (seder, “order”). Pronunciation (UK) IPA(key): /ˈseɪdə/. Noun seder (plural seders or sidarim or siddarim).
  1. (Judaism) The ceremonial meal held on the first night or two nights of Passover.
  2. (Judaism) One of the 54 parts into which the Torah is divided (5+4=9).
  • Etymology 2. seder, Interlingua, Verb, seder
  1. to sit.
  • Etymology 3. seder, Norwegian Bokmål, From Ancient Greek κέδρος (kédros), via Latin cedrus. Noun, seder m (definite singular sederen, indefinite plural sedere or sedre or sedrer, definite plural sederne or sedrene)
  1. a cedar (tree of genus Cedrus).
  • Etymology 4. seder, Nubi, Noun, séder (plural sederá)
  1. tree.
  • Etymology 5. seder, Swedish, Noun, seder
  1. indefinite plural of sed.
  • The etymology of the word sed, Latin, Alternative forms
  1. set.
  • Set is a god of desert, storms, disorder, violence, and foreigners in ancient Egyptian religion. In Ancient Greek, the god's name is given as Sēth. Set a positive role where he accompanies Ra on his solar boat to repel Apep, the serpent of Chaos. Set a vital role as a reconciled combatant. He was the lord of the red (desert) land where he was the balance of Horus' role as a lord of the black (soil) land. In Egyptian mythology, Set is portrayed as the usurper who killed and mutilated his own brother Osiris.
  • Etymology 2nd ed., Swedish, Etymology, From Old Swedish Sierra, from Old Norse siðr, from Proto-Germanic * siduz.
  • The etymology of the word siduz, Proto-Germanic, Uncertain. On the suggestion that the meaning "custom" developed from "band, bond", Kroonen tentatively reconstructs Pre-Germanic *sh₂itús (“bond, rule, tradition”), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂y- (“to bind”).
  1. Descendants:  Old English: sidu, seodu
  2. Middle English: side
  3. Old Frisian: side
  4. North Frisian: side, sede
  5. Saterland Frisian: Sidde
  6. West Frisian: sede
  7. Old Saxon: sidu
  8. Middle Low German: side
  9. Old Dutch: sido
  10. Middle Dutch: sēde
  11. Dutch: zede
  12. Old High German: situ
  13. Middle High German: site
  14. German: Sitte
  15. Luxembourgish: Sitt
  16. Old Norse: siðr
  17. Icelandic: siður
  18. Faroese: siður
  19. Old Swedish: siþer, sedher
  20. Swedish: sed
  21. Danish: sæd
  22. Gothic: 𐍃𐌹𐌳𐌿𐍃 (sidus).
  • Etymology of the word sidus, Ido, Verb, sidus
  1. conditional of sidar.
  • The etymology of the word sidar, Ido, From Esperanto sidi, from English sit, German sitzen, from Proto-Germanic *sitjaną, Italian sedere, from Latin sedēre, present active infinitive of sedeō, Russian сиде́ть (sidétʹ), from Old East Slavic сидѣти (siděti), from Proto-Slavic *sěděti, all ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sed-. Verb, sidar (present tense sidas, past tense sidis, future tense sidos, imperative sidez, conditional sidus)
  1. (intransitive) to sit, be sitting.
  • The etymology of the word sidas, Spanish, Verb, sidas f pl
  1. Feminine plural past participle of ser.
  • The etymology of the word ser, Baure, Noun, ser
  1. tooth.
  • Etymology 2. ser, Aragonese, From Latin sedēre, present active infinitive of sedeō (“I sit, I reside”). However, many of the forms derive from Vulgar Latin *essere, from Latin esse, sum. Verb, ser
  1. to be.
  • Noun, ser m (plural seres)
  1. being
  • Etymology 3. ser, Catalan, Alternative forms
  1. ésser.
  • From a reduction of ésser, from Vulgar Latin *essere and this from Latin esse, present active infinitive of sum, from Proto-Italic *ezom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti (“I am, I exist”).
  • Etymology 4. ser, Kurdish, Noun, ser m
  1. head (Kop)
  • Etymology 5. ser, Middle Dutch, Noun, ser
  1. (title and pronoun) sir, lord.
  • The etymology of the word lord, English, From Middle English lord and lorde (attested from the 15th century), from earlier (14th century) lourde and other variants which dropped the intervocalic vowel of earlier lowerd, louerd, loverd, laford, and lhoaverd; from Old English hlāford and hlāfweard, a compound of hlāf (“bread, loaf”) + weard (“ward, guardian, keeper”); see loaf and ward. The compound exists in Icelandic as lávarður, related to the Old English hlāf-ǣta (“servant”, literally “bread-eater”); it was already being applied broadly prior to the literary development of Old English and was influenced by its common use to translate Latin dominus. Compare Scots laird (“lord”), preserving a separate vowel development, and modern English lady, from Old English hlǣfdīġe (“bread-kneader”). Noun, lord (plural lords).
  • any nobleman or aristocrat; any chief, prince, or sovereign ruler.
  • synonyms: master, lord and master, ruler, leader, chief, superior, monarch, sovereign, king, emperor, prince, governor, commander, captain, overlord, suzerain, baron, potentate, liege, liege lord.
  1. and name for God or Christ.
  • Etymology 6. ser, Mirandese, See also, star.
  • The etymology of the word star, English, From Middle English sterre, from the Old English steorra ("star"), from Proto-Germanic * sternó, * stern ("star"), from Proto-Indo-European * h₂stḗr "). Noun, star (plural stars)
  1. Any small luminous dot appearing in the cloudless part of the night sky, especially with a fixed location relative to other such dots.
  2. (astronomy) A luminous celestial body, made of plasma (especially hydrogen and helium) and having a spherical shape. Depending on the context, the sun may or may not be included.
  3. (geometry) A concave polygon with regular, protrusions and indentations, generally with five or six points.
  4. A pentagram (sometimes known as a pentagon, pentangle or star pentagon) is the shape of a five-pointed star.
  • See also:
  1. astronomers
  2. black hole
  3. galaxy
  4. moon
  5. mullet
  6. planets
  7. red gian
  • Etymology 2nd star, Slovene From Proto-Slavic * Old. Adjective, stàr (comparative old, superlative nàjstarêjši)
  • old, aged.
  • Etymology 7. ser, Spanish, Partially from Old Spanish, from Latin, present active infinitive of sedeō ("I sit, I reside"), from Proto-Italic * sedēō, from Proto-Indo-European * sed-, and partially from Vulgar Latin * essere, from Latin esse, present active infinitive of sum, from Proto-Italic * ezom, from Proto-Indo-European * hses ("I am, I exist"). Noun serm seres
  1. and being, body
  2. nature, essence
  3. value, worth.
  • Usage notes: Portuguese and Spanish have two different verbs, which are usually translated into English as "to be": ser is related to essence, contrasting with estar, which relates to state. Contrast the following:
  1. El hombre está feliz. - The man is [currently] happy.
  2. He hombre es feliz. - The man is [always] happy.
  • Etymology 8. ser, Turkish, From Persian سر (sar), Noun, ser (definite accusative {{{1}}} plural {{{2}
  • (archaic) head.
  • Synonyms (head): baş, kafa.
  • Etymology 9. ser, Volapük, Numeral, ser
  1. zero.
  • The etymology of the word zero, English, from French zéro, from Italian zero, from Medieval Latin zephirum, from Arabic صفر (نور, "nothing, cipher").
  • The etymology of the word cipher, English, 14th century. From Old French Cyfre, French (French Chiffre), ultimately from Arabic صفر (نور, "zero, empty"), from صفر (ṣafara, "to be empty"). Compare zero. Sense 9 may be a different word. Noun, cipher (plural ciphers).
  1. A numeric character.
  2. Any text character.
  3. A combination or interweaving of letters, as the initials of a name; a device; and a monogram.
  4. A method of transforming a text to conceal its meaning.
  5. (cryptography) A cryptographic system using an algorithm that converts letters or sequences of bits into ciphertext.
  6. Ciphertext; and message concealed via a cipher.
  7. A grouping of three digits in a number, especially when delimited by commas or periods:
  • Synonyms: (obsolete: zero): naught / nought, nothing, oh, zero.
  • Etymology 2nd zero, Numeral, zero
  1. (cardinal) The cardinal number occurring before one and that denotes no quantity or amount at all, represented in Arabic numerals as 0.
  • Synonyms:
  1. 0
  2. cipher
  3. (informal) goose egg
  4. love (tennis)
  5. naught (US)
  6. nought
  7. nil
  8. no
  9. null
  • See also: Table of cardinal numbers 0 to 9 in various languages.
  • Noun, zero (countless and uncountable, plural zeroes or zeroes).
  • The digit 0 in the decimal, binary, and all other base numbering systems.
  • (mathematics, algebra) The additive identity element of a monoid or greater algebraic structure, especially a group or ring.
  • Antonyms: (value of a function's variables at zero): field.
  • Etymology of the word field, English, From Middle English field, pal, from Old English pāl ("a field, stake, a kind of hoe or spade"), from Proto-Germanic * palaz, * pālaz "), From Latin pālus (" stake, pale, prop, stay ") from Old Latin * paglus, from Proto-Indo-European * pāe- (" to nail, fasten ").
  • Etymology of the 2nd field, From Middle French pole, pole, and its source, Latin polus, from the ancient Greek pole (polos, "axis of rotation"). Noun field (plural poles)
  1. Either of the two points on the earth's surface around which it rotates; Also, similar points on any other rotating object.
  2. A point of magnetic focus, in particular each of the two opposing points of a magnet (designated north and south).
  3. (geometry) A fixed point relative to other points or lines.
  4. The firmament; the sky.
  • Etymology 3rd Field, Aiwoo, Verb, Field
  1. to work (in a garden or field)
  • Etymology 4th Field, Esperanto, Adverb, Field
  1. in Polish.
  • Etymology 3rd zero, Kurdish, zer + -o Noun, zero
  1. blond (male).
  • Etymology 10, ser, Welsh, Noun, serum m serod or seroedd
  1. billhook, sickle, scythe
  2. (dictionary) sword.
  • Etymology 2. sidus, Latin, Compare Ancient Greek iron (sídēros). Some derive this from the Proto-Indo-European * sweyd-, whence Latin sūdor, Greek Ύδρω (hidrṓs), English sweat. Noun, sīdus n (genitive sīderis); third declension
  1. constellation, asterism
  2. and star
  • Synonyms: astēr, astrum, stēlla
  1. (poetic) the night sky
  2. (figuratively) and season (of the year).
  • Etymology 6. son, Alternative forms
  1. sun
  2. sion
  • The etymology of the word sion, English, Noun, sion (plural sions)
  1. Obsolete spelling of scion.
  • Etymology 2nd Sion, English, Proper noun, Sion
  • Alternative spelling of Zion.
  • The etymology of the word Zion,
  1. A mountain (kick) on which Jerusalem is built.
  2. Jerusalem.
  • Etymology 2. Zion, German, Alternative forms
  1. on.
  • Proper noun, Zion m (genitive zions)
  1. Zion (a mountain).
  • The etymology of the word kop, English, Afrikaans, Noun, kop kops)
  1. (South Africa) A hill or mountain (Zion).
  • Etymology 7th son, Lower Sorbian, Noun, son
  1. (archaic) swan (waterfowl of the genus Cygnus).
  • Etymology 12th, Torres Strait Creole, From English hand. Noun, an
  1. hand, lower arm.
  2. flipper.
  • Etymology 13th, Vilamovian, Related terms, alf.
  • The etymology of the word alf, Danish, From Old Norse alfr, from Proto-Germanic * albiz. Noun, alpha c (singularly defined alpha, plural indefinite alfer)
  1. fairy
  2. elf.
  • Etymology 2. alf, West Frisian, Numeral, al
  • eleven (he + even).
  • The etymology of the word elf, English, From Middle English elf, elfe, from Old English ælf ("incubus, elf"), from Proto-Germanic * albiz, from Proto-Indo-European * h₂elbʰós ("white"). Noun, elf (plural elves). Noun elf (elves).
  • (Norse mythology) A luminous spirit presiding over nature and fertility and dwelling in the world of Álfheim (Elfland). Compare angel, nymph, fairy.
  • The etymology of the word not used to form the word Io + an + is not.
  • Etymology 1. nes, Czech, Verb, nes, Anagrams, sen.
  • The etymology of the word sen, Abenaki, Noun, sen (inanimate, plural senal)
  1. stone, rock.
  • Etymology 2nd dream, Basque, Noun, dream
  1. mind
  • See also:
  1. adimen
  2. buru
  3. gogo.
  • The etymology of the word buru, Bambara, Pronunciation, IPA (key): [búruù]
  • Noun, buru
  1. (anatomy) horn.
  • Etymology 2nd buru, Basque, Noun, buru.
  1. head (kick)
  • Etymology 3rd buru, Gamilaraay, Noun, buru.
  1. ball
  2. ball game
  3. balls
  4. testicles
  • Etymology 4. Sranan Tongo, Borrowed from Dutch Boer. Noun buru
  1. farmer.
  • Etymology 5. Zarma, Noun, buru
  1. bread
  • The etymology of the word gogo, Chichewa, Noun, gógo class 1a (agogo class 2) or gogo class 1a (agogo class 2)
  1. grandparent (grandfather or grandmother).
  • Etymology 3rd dream, Czech, From Proto-Slavic * sans, from Proto-Balto-Slavic * supnas, from Proto-Indo-European * swppnos, * soupnos * swep-. Noun, dream m inan
  1. dream.
  • Etymology 4. Dream, Friulian, From Latin sinus. Noun, sen m (meaning plural)
  1. (anatomy) bosom, breast
  • Etymology 5. sen, Galician, Noun, sen m (plural sense)
  1. (archaic) judgment
  2. (anatomy) temple.
  • The etymology of the word temple, English, From the Middle English temple, from the Latin temple, from the Latin Temple ("shrine, temple, area for auspices"). Noun temple (plural temples)
  1. A house of worship, especially
  2. A house of worship dedicated to a polytheistic faith. 
  3. (Judaism) A synagogue, especially a non-Orthodox synagogue. 
  4. (Mormonism) A church closed to non-Mormons and necessary for particular rituals.
  5. A meeting house of the Oddfellows fraternity; its members.
  6. (figuratively) Any place regarded as holding a religious presence.
  7. (figuratively) Anything considered as important or minutely cared for.
  8. (figuratively) A gesture where the forefingers are outstretched and touch pad to pad while the other fingers are clasped together. 
  • Hyponyms: (house of worship): church (Christian, usually distinguished); mosque (Muslim, usually distinguished); synagogue (Jewish); athenaeum (dedicated to Athena), Mithraeum (dedicated to Mithras); Iseum, Iseion (dedicated to Isis); serapeum (dedicated to Serapis); hecatomedone (and a temple of 100 feet long or square).
  • Related terms: Templar. Templar (Templars) 1. One of the Knights Templar.
  • Etymology 2nd Temple, from the Middle English Temple, from the Temple of the Temple (Temple, head of the temple). See temporal bone. Noun, temple (plural temples)
  1. (anatomy) The slightly flatter region, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear.
  2. (ophthalmology) Either of the sidepieces on a set of spectacles, extending backwards from the hinge toward the ears and, usually, turning around them.
  • Etymology 3rd Temple, From Latin templum ("a small timber, a purlin"); compare template and template. Noun, temple (plural temples)
  1. (weaving) A contrivance used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely.
  • Etymology 6. sen, Indonesian, Noun, sen
  1. cent.
  • The etymology of the word cent, English, Borrowed from the Old French Cent, from the Latin Centum, from Proto-Indo-European * ḱm̥tóm. Usage notes: Due to the different plural formats used in European languages, it is common to use the word cent as a plural throughout the Eurozone.
  • Synonyms:
  1. (of a dollar): Dollar
  2. (of a euro): euro cent
  3. (coin (Canada, US)): penny.
  • Etymology 7th Dream, Old Irish, From Proto-Celtic * senos, ultimately from Proto Indo-European * sénos. Adjective sen (comparative sinus, superlative sinem)
  1. old
  • Descendants, Irish: sean.
  • The etymology of the word sean, Volapük, Noun, sean (seans)
  1. ocean (large body of water)
  • Etymology 8. sen, vietnamese, noun, (classifier hon, bông, hoa) sen (𬞮)
  1. lotus.
  • The etymology of the word lotus, English, Borrowed from Latin lōtus. 
  • Noun, lotus (plural lotuses or loti)
  1. A kind of aquatic plant, the Nelumbo family in the family Nelumbonaceae.
  2. A water lily, the genus Nymphaea, especially those of Egypt or India.
  3. A legendary plant eaten by the Lotophagi of the Odyssey that caused drowsiness and euphoria.
  4. A number of other plants bearing "lotus" in their scientific or common names (see Derived terms below).
  5. Diospyros lotus, date plum or Caucasian persimmon.
  6. Lotus, and a genus that includes bird's-foot trefoils and deer vetches, and a terrestrial genus with small flowers
  7. Ziziphus lotus, and shrub species with edible fruit
  8. An architectural motif of ancient Egyptian temples.
  • Etymology 8. Dream, Westrobothnian, From Old Norse sin, from Proto-Germanic * senawō. Noun, sen f (defined singular sena, defined plural senjen)
  1. Tendon. (Derived terms: Achilles' tendon)
  • Achilles or Achilleus was a Greek hero of the Trojan War and the central character and greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad. His mother was the immortal Nereid Thetis, and his father, the mortal Peleus, was the king of the Myrmidons. 
  • The Myrmidons were a legendary people native to the region of Thessaly, Ellada. 
  • Etymology 9. Dream, Tok Pisin, From English chain. Noun, dream
  1. chain.
  • Etymology of the word chain, English, From Middle English chaine, from Old French chaine, chaene ("Modern"), from Latin catēna ("chain"), from Proto-Indo-European * "To braid, twist; hut, shed"). Coca-Cola with Dutch Friesian ketten, Dutch keten ("chain"), Low German Kede ("chain"), German Kette ("chain" ), Icelandic keðja ("chain"). Doublet of catena. Noun, chain (plural chains)
  1. A series of interconnected rings or links usually made of metal.
  2. A series of interconnected things. and a chain of mountains.
  • Etymology 2nd noun, Dutch, Noun, nes f (nessen, diminutive nesje n)
  1. headland, spit.
  • The etymology of the word headland, English, head + land. Noun, headland plural headlands
  1. Coastal land that juts into the sea.
  2. The unplowed boundary of a field.
  • The etymology of the word spit, from the Middle English spytte, spette, spite, spyte, spete, from Old English spitu, from Proto-Germanic * spitō, from Proto-Indo-European * spid-, * spey- stick "). Cognate with Dutch Spitt, German Low German Spitt, Danish spid, Swedish Spett. Noun, spit
  1. A rod on which meat is grilled (UK English) or cooked (US English).
  2. A narrow, pointed, usually sandy peninsula. 
  • Etymology 3rd, Faroese, From Old Norse not ("headland"). Kindred words are Old English næs (English ness and naze); the Swedish näs, the German nase; the Latin nasus ("a nose") and the Icelandic nös ("nose"). Noun, not n (genitive singular nes, plural nes)
  1. and headland, and cape, and ness projecting to the sea or lake, and the promontory
  2. the peninsula
  • The etymology of the word peninsula, English, borrowed from Latin paenīnsula, from paene ("almost"), and insula ("island").

The etymology of the word used to form the word Kop + sid + ás.

  • Etymology 1. ás, Galician, Noun, ás f pl
  1. plural of á.
  • The etymology of the word á, Faroese, From Old Norse á ("river"), Svabo: Aa, [3] from Proto-Germanic * ahwō, from Proto-Indo-European * h₂ekʷeh₂ ("water"). Noun, and f (genitive singular aar, plural air).
  1. brook, stream, river.
  • Etymology 2. á, Irish, From dhá, lenited variant of da. 
  • Etymology 3rd, Old Portuguese, From Latin illa f ("that").
  • Etymology 4. á ,. From Old Portuguese aa ("wing"), from Latin āla ("wing"). Cognate with Galician, Spanish ala, Catalan ala, Occitan ala, French aile, Italian ala and Ligurian aa. Doublet of ala, which was a borrowing.
  • Etymology 2. ás, Galician, From contraction of preposition a ("to, towards") + feminine plural defined article as ("the") Contraction, masculine sg ao, feminine sg á, masculine plural aos).
  • The etymology of the aos, Irish, From Old Irish, noun, aos m (genitive singular aosa)
  1. people, folk.
  • Derived terms: aosan m ("fairy; fairies"). The aos network, the older form, is the Irish term for a supernatural race in Irish mythology and Scottish mythology (similar to fairies or elves). 
  • Etymology 2nd aos, Irish, Noun, aos m
  1. Alternative form of ois ("age").
  • Etymology 3. ás, Hungarian, Derived terms (With verbal prefixes): elás.
  • The etymology of the word elas, Greece.
  • Etymology 2. elas, Volapük, Article, elas
  1. genitive plural of el.
  • Etymology 4th, Icelandic, From Old Norse áss, from Proto-Germanic, * ansaz. Noun, m (genitive singular áss, nominative plural asar)
  1. beam, rafter, field
  2. axis.
  • Etymology 5. ás, Icelandic, From Old Norse, probably from Proto-Germanic * amsaz, cognate with Gothic 𐌰𐌼𐍃 (ams, "shoulder"), but possibly the same as ás. Noun, m (genitive singular áss, nominative plural asar)
  1. and a low low hill, and (low) ridge.
  • Etymology 6. ás, Icelandic, From Old Norse, ßss, from Proto-Germanic * ansuz, from Proto-Indo-European * hensens, from Proto-Indo-European * h₂ens- ("to engender, beget"). Alternative forms Ás, Noun, ás m (genitive singular áss, nominative plural æsir)
  1. one of the Æsir, the principal Norse gods.
  • The etymology of the word Æsir. In Old Norse, ǫss (or áss, ás, plural æsir; feminine ásynja, plural ásynjur) is a member of the principal pantheon in Norse religion. This pantheon includes Odin, Frigg, Thor, Baldr and Týr. The second pantheon is known as the Vanir. In Norse mythology, the two pantheons wage war against each other, resulting in a unified pantheon. 
  • ás = God. 
  • The Æsir and the Vanir are the Titans and the Olympians of ancient Greece, the Tuath Dé Danann and the Fomorians of ancient Ireland. 
  • Included is the conflict between the Semites of Rome and the Sabines (Spartans) of Rome.
  • Etymology 7th, Portuguese, From Latin as ("a type of Roman coin"). 
  • Etymology 8. as, English, Noun, as plural ases or asses
  1. (unit of weight) A pound.
  2. Any of several coins of Rome, coined in bronze or later copper; or the equivalent value.
  • The as (plural assēs), occasionally assarius (assarion) was a bronze, later copper used during the Roman Empire and Roman Empire. 
  • Etymology 8. as, Achumawi, Noun, as
  1. water.
  • Etymology 9. as, Danish, From Old Norse áss (pl æsir). Noun, as c (singularly defined asen, plural indefinite aser)
  1. one of the Æsir.
  • Etymology 10. as, Danish, Noun, as n (singular defined asset, plural indefinite asser)
  1. A-flat (A ♭).
  • Etymology 11. as, Dutch, From Middle Dutch asce, from Old Dutch * aska, from Proto-Germanic * ask.
  • Cognate with Low German Asch, German Ashe, English ash, West Frisian jiske, Danish aske, Swedish aska. Noun, as f (plural assen, diminutive asje n).
  1. ash
  2. ashes.
  • Etymology 12. as, Conjunction, as.
  1. (The Hague dialect) Alternative spelling of als
  • Preposition: as
  1. (The Hague dialect) Alternative spelling of als
  2. (The Hague dialect) eive ... as: as ... as.
  • Etymology 13th, Irish, From Old Irish Ass, and ("out of") (compare Scottish Gaelic à), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European * h1eʰʰs (compare Latin ex). 
  • The etymology of the word es, English, Noun, ex (plural exes).
  1. The name of the Latin-script letter X / x.
  • The etymology of the word ex, Middle English, Noun, ex.
  1. Alternative form of ax ("axis").
  • The etymology of the word X, English, Adjective, X (not comparable)
  1. Intersex or non-binary.
  • The etymology of the word intersex, Noun, intersex (plural intersexes)
  1. Any of a variety of conditions (in a dioecious species) whereby an individual has male and female sex characteristics; the state of having the physical features of both sexes; intersexuality.
  • Usage notes: Since the turn of the millennium (2000), the adjective intersex and noun phrase intersex person have been preferred to hermaphroditic and hermaphrodite as being more appropriate when the referent is human. The intersex noun has also become more common than intersexuality.
  • Synonyms
  1. intersexed
  2. intersexual
  3. (sometimes offensive): hermaphroditic, hermaphrodite
  4. (clinical, sometimes offensive): pseudohermaphroditic, pseudohermaphrodite
  5. (on forms and documents): indeterminate, X
  • Etymology 2. X, English, From Christ by abbreviation, from Ancient Greek X (Kh, "(letter chi)"), from Christ (Khristós, "Christ"). Proper noun, X
  1. (informal) Christ.
  • Derived terms
  1. Xianity. Abbreviation of Christianity.
  2. Xmas. Abbreviation of Christmas.
  • Etymology 3. X, In Plato's Timaeus, it is explained that the two bands that form the "world soul" (anima mundi) cross each other like the letter Xi, possibly referring to the ecliptic crossing the celestial equator. The celestial equator is the great circle of the imaginary celestial sphere on the same plane as the equator of Earth. Justin Martyr in the 2nd century makes explicit reference to Plato's image in Timaeus in terms of a prefiguration of the Holy Cross. and an early testimony may be the phrase in Didache, "sign of extension in heaven" (sēmeion epektaseōs en ouranōi).
  • The Atlantis Cross design is based on Plato's description of the layout of the streets of Basel, the Atlantean Capitol city, in Timaeus and Criteas.
  • Atlantis "Island of Atlas") is an island mentioned in Plato's works by Timaeus and Critias.
  • According to Plato, the first king of Atlantis was also named Atlas, the son of Poseidon.
  • Poseidon was one of the Twelve Olympians in the ancient Greek religion.
  • He was god of the sea and other waters; of earthquakes; and of horses.
  • Etymology 4. X, From cross, due to the X symbol being a cross saltire.
  • The saltire, also called Saint Andrew's Cross or the crux decussata, is a heraldic symbol in the form of a diagonal cross, like the shape of the letter X in Roman.
  • The etymology of the word cross, Alternative forms of Cross (sometimes for the historical cross of Christ).
  • Etymology 2. Cross, English, From Middle English cross, cros, from Old English cros ("rood, cross"), from Old Norse kross (perhaps from Old Irish Cross) from Latin crux. Cognate with Icelandic kross ("cross"), Faroese krossur ("cross"), Danish kors ("cross"), Swedish kors ("cross"). Displaced native Middle English rood ("rood, cross"), from Old English ród ("cross, rood, crucifix, field"); see rood. The sense of "two intersecting lines drawn or cut on a surface, two lines intersecting at right angles" without regard to religious significance develops from the late 14th century.
  • The etymology of the word rood, English, From Middle English rode, rood ("cross, rood"), from Old English ród ("a rod, field, , rood (as in Holy-rood), gallows, and cross on which a person is executed, from a Proto-Germanic * rōdō, * ródme ("rod, field" Indo-European * rōt-, * reh½t- ("bar, beam, stem"). Cognate with German Rute ("rod, cane, field"), Norwegian roda ("gender"). Largely displaced by cross. More at the rod.
  • The etymology of the word Holyrood, English, English, holy + rood. Proper noun Holyrood
  1. (Christianity) A relic believed to be part of the True Cross.
  2. An area of ​​Edinburgh, the home of the Scottish Parliament.
  3. (by extension, by metonymy) The Scottish Parliament.
  • Holyrood Palace. The Palace of Holyroodhouse, commonly referred to as Holyrood Palace, is the official residence of the British monarch in Scotland, Queen Elizabeth II. Situated in the heart of Edinburgh's Royal Mile, Edinburgh Castle is a 5-minute walk from Edinburgh Castle. It features a rooftop pool and a 24-hour front desk.
  • Etymology 5. X, Derived terms.
  1. X marks the spot
  2. XXX
  • Etymology 6. X, Korean, From Japanese × (batsu). Derived terms
  1. OX
  • The etymology of the word OX, From Middle English oxe, from Old English oxa, from Proto-Germanic * uhsô (compare West Frisian okse, Dutch os, German Ochse), from Proto-Indo-European * uksḗn. Cognate with Welsh ych ("ox"), Tocharian A ops, Tocharian B okso ("draft-ox"), Avestan (uxshan, "bull"), Sanskrit उक्षन् (ukṣán). Noun ox (oxen).
  1. An adult castrated male of cattle (B. taurus).
  2. Any bovine animal (Bos genus).
  • The etymology of the word ops, Latin, From Proto-Indo-European * h3ep- (i) -, * h3op- (i) - (force, ability), from * h3ep- base, whence Sanskrit अप्नस् , "Property, possession") and possibly Ancient Greek ibins (ómpnē, "food"). Related to omnis, optimus and opus.
  • Derived terms copis, cops. cópia.
  • The etymology of the word copis, Latin, Borrowed from Ancient Greek, kopis, koptō, "I cut". Noun copis f (genitive copidis); third declension
  1. A short sword.
  • The etymology of the word Copia, Italian, From Latin cópia ("abundance"). Derived terms
  1. cōpiōsus
  2. cornūcōpia.
  • The etymology of the word cornūcōpia, From Latin cornūcōpia ("horn of plenty"), from cornū ("horn") + cōpia ("abundance").
  1. (Greek mythology) A goat's horn endlessly overflowing with fruit, flowers and grain; or full of whatever its owner wanted.
  2. A hollow horn- or cone-shaped object, filled with edible or useful things.
  3. An abundance or abundant supply.
  • Etymology 2nd ops, In ancient Roman religion, Ops or Opis (Latin: "Plenty") was a fertility deity and earth goddess of Sabine origin. In Ops' statues and coins, she is figured sitting, as Chthonian deities normally are, and generally, hold a scepter or a corn spray and cornucopia.
  • Etymology 3rd ops, Hellenic, Ancient Greek, Pronunciation, IPA: / ops / → / ops / → / ops /. From Proto-Hellenic * wókʷs, from Proto-Indo-European * wṓkʷs. Related to epos and epi. Cognates includes Latin vōx, Sanskrit वाच् (vāc), and Tocharian A wak. Noun óψ • (óps) f (genitive); third declension
  1. (poetic) voice
  2. (poetic) word.
  • Etymology 2. From Proto-Hellenic * óps, from Proto-Indo-European * h3ókʷs. See also ὤψ (ṓps). Noun, f (f) f (genitive f); third declension (rare)
  1. eye, face.
  • Etymology 2. ex, Spanish, Adjective, ex (indeclinable, always before the noun)
  1. Former; referring to a condition that has ended.
  • Etymology 14, as, Old Irish, Alternative forms
  1. ass
  2. es
  • The etymology of the word ass, Latvian, From Proto-Baltic * as-is, from Proto-Indo-European * aḱs-, from * a-es-, from * a-; armpit "). Originally an i / n-stem, it became an i-stem in the Baltic. Cognates include Lithuanian ašis, Old Prussian Assis, Russian, Serbian, Bosnian, Russian, Serbian, Bosnian, Serbian, Bosnian, Bosnian, Bosnian, Bosnian अक्षः ákṣaḥ, "axle"), Ancient Greek ξξων (háxōn) (Greek axis (áxonas)), Latin axis.
  • Etymology 15th, Old Saxon, From Proto-Germanic * ansuz ("god, deity"). Noun, ás m (declension unknown)
  1. god
  2. the runic character ᚨ (/ a / and / and / /).
  • Etymology 16th, Serbo-Croatian, borrowed from German as, from Latin as ("as, copper coin").
  • Etymology 18th, Tok Pisin, From English Arse. Noun, as
  1. buttocks, backside
  2. bottom, base
  3. reason, meaning, motivation
  4. start, source

The etymology of the word cop used to form the word Cop + sidas.

  • Etymology 1. cop, Middle English, Noun, cop (plural coppes).
  1. summit (of a mountain or hill).
  2. top, tip, topmost part.
  3. top of the head, crown.
  4. head.
  • The etymology of the word crown, English, Borrowed from Anglo-Norman Coruna, Curve, Old French Corone (French couronne), from the Latin corona ("wreath"). Doublet of corona. Noun, crown
  1. A royal, imperial or princely headdress; and a diadem.
  2. (heraldry) A representation of such a headdress, as in heraldry; it may even be that the only image exists, no physical crown, as in the case of the Kingdom of Belgium; the analogues such crowns can be awarded to moral persons who do not even have a head, as the mural crown for cities in heraldry
  3. A wreath or band for the head, especially one given as a reward of victory or a mark of honor.
  4. (by extension) Any reward of victory or a mark of honor.
  5. Imperial or regal power, or those who wield it.
  6. (metonymically) The sovereign (in a monarchy), as head of state.
  7. (by extension, especially in law) The state, the government (headed by a monarch).
  8. Treasure recovered from shipwrecks automatically becomes property of the Crown.
  9. The topmost part of the head.
  10. The highest part of a hill.
  11. The top section of a hat, above the brim.
  12. The raised center of a road.
  13. The highest part of an arch.
  14. Splendor; culmination; acme.
  15. Any currency (originally) issued by the crown (regal power) and often bearing a crown (headdress); (translation) various currencies known by similar names in their native languages ​​such as the crown, crown, crown.
  16. (historical) A former British decade of coin worth five shillings.
  17. (botany) The part of a plant where the root and stem meet.
  18. (forestry) The top of a tree.
  19. (anatomy) The part of a tooth above the gums.
  20. (dentistry) A prosthetic covering for a tooth.
  21. (nautical) A knot formed in the end of a rope by tucking in the strands to prevent them from unravelling
  22. (nautical) The part of an anchor where the arms and the shank meet
  23. (nautical) The rounding or rounded part of the deck from a level line.
  24. (nautical, in the plural) The bits formed by the turns of a cable.
  25. (paper) A standard paper size measuring 20 inches x 15 inches.
  26. (chemistry) A monocyclic ligand having three or more binding sites capable of holding a guest in a central location
  27. (medicine) During childbirth, the appearance of the baby's head from the mother's vagina.
  28. (firearms) A rounding or smoothing of the barrel opening
  29. The upper range of facets in a rose diamond.
  30. The dome of a furnace.
  31. (geometry) The area enclosed between two concentric perimeters.
  32. (religion) A round spot shaved clean on the top of the head, as a mark of the clerical state; the tonsure.
  33. A whole turkey with the legs and wings removed to produce a joint of white meat.
  34. (African American Vernacular, colloquial) A formal hat worn by women to Sunday church services; and church crown.
  • Synonyms:
  1. (reward of victory or honor of honor): award, garland, honor / honor, prize, wreath
  2. (royal, imperial or princely headdress): coronet
  3. (representation of such a headdress):
  4. (wreath or band for the head): garland, wreath
  5. (imperial or regal power): monarchy, royalty
  6. (of the head): apex, top
  7. (of a hill): apex, peak, summit, top
  8. (center of a road).
  9. (the highest part of an arch):
  10. (of a hat): top
  11. (splendor, finish, culmination): completion, culmination, finish, splendor / splendor
  12. (currency):
  13. (British coin): caser, tusheroon, tush, tosheroon, tosh, bull, caroon, thick-un, coachwheel, cartwheel
  14. (part of plant):
  15. (anatomy: part of tooth): corona
  16. (dentistry: prosthetic cover for a tooth):
  • Antonyms: (of a hill): base, bottom, foot.
  • Etymology 2nd Crown, English, Adjective, Crown (not comparable)
  1. Of, related to or related to a crown. crown prince.
  2. Of, related to, pertaining to the top of a tree or trees.
  • The Crown Verb (third-person singular simple present crowns, the present participle crowning, the simple past and the past participle crowned)
  1. To place a crown on the head of.
  2. Formally declare (someone) a king, queen, emperor, etc.
  3. It bestows something like a mark of honor, dignity, or reward; to adorn; it dignify.
  4. It forms the topmost or finishing part of; to complete; to consummate; it's perfect.
  5. Declare (someone) a winner.
  6. (medicine) Of a baby, during the birthing process; for the surface of the baby's head to appear in the vaginal opening. The mother was in the second stage of labor and the fetus was just crowned, prompting a round of encouragement from the midwives.
  7. (video games) To shoot a opponent in the back of a head with a shotgun in a first-person shooter video game.
  8. (board games) In checkers, stack two checkers to indicate that the piece has become a king.
  9. (firearms) It widen the opening of the barrel.
  10. (military) To effect a lodge upon, as the crest of the glacis, or the summit of the breach.
  11. (nautical) To lay the ends of the strands of (and knot) over and under each other.
  • Derived terms: crowned.
  • See also: coronation.
  • Etymology 3. English, Verb, Crown.
  1. (obsolete) past participle of crow.

21. The etymology of the word Sida used to form the word Kop + Sida.


  • Etymology 1. Sida, Modern Latin, from Hellenic sidē 'pomegranate tree', also 'water lily.'
  • The etymology of the word side is from Middle Irish, Noun, Side, and a fairy hill or mound. 2. (in plural) = áes side ("people of the fairy mounds, supernatural beings, fairies"). The aes is the Irish term for a supernatural race in the Irish and Scottish tradition, ie the Tuatha Dé Danann.
  • Etymology 2. Sida, English-noun (plural sidas), from the genus name meaning water lily or pomegranate. The word "sida" derives from the writings of Theophrastus, who was a pupil of Aristotle. Aristotle left his original manuscripts and library to Theophrastus. Aristotle was a pupil of Plato.
  • Sida also means Bodb Sidi ar Femen ('of the Mound on Femen').
  • Etymology 3. Sida, from Ilocano, Noun, sida 1. fish.
  • Etymology 4. Sida, from Bodb Derg, ie, Bodb Sidi ar Femen ('of the Mound on Femen').

22. The etymology of the word Kops used to form the word Kops + idas.


  • Etymology 1st kick, homophone copse.
  • Etymology 1. copse and a small group of trees, especially live Oak (Dagda / Daghda / Dag-ida) or Elm (Elm / Elatha), grove, mott, forest, orchard (pomegranates) , wood, coppice, bush, brush. (Grove-Druidism, Wicca) A place of worship.
  • Etymology 1. copse, English, 1578, from coppice, by contraction, originally meaning "small wood grown for purposes of periodic cutting."
  • Pronunciation
  1.  IPA (key): / k /
  2. Rhymes: -III
  3. Homophone: cops.
  • Noun copse (plural copses)
  1. A thicket of small trees or shrubs.
  • Synonyms coppice.
  • The etymology of the word Coppice, English, Borrowed from Old French Copez, from the presumptive Vulgar Latin * colpatrium ("to cut, strike "), From * colpus (" a blow "), from Latin colaphus (" a cuff, box on the ear "), from an ancient Greek collagos (kólaphos," a blow, slap "). noun, coppice (plural coppices).
  1. A grove of small growth; and a thicket of brushwood; and wood cut at certain times for fuel or other purposes, typically managed to promote growth and ensure a reliable supply of timber. See copse.
  • The etymology of the word grove, From Middle English grove, grave, from Old English grāf, grāfa ("grove; copse"); compare English groove. Related to Old English grǣf, grǣfe ("brushwood; thicket; copse") and Old English grǣfa ("thicket"). More at greaves. Noun, grove plural groves
  1. A small forest.
  2. An orchard of fruit trees.
  3. (Druidism, Wicca) A place of worship.
  • Related terms: mangrove.
  • The etymology of the word mangrove, English, Circa 1610, corruption of the earlier mangrow by the folk etymology influence of the grove, from the Portuguese manga, from the Spanish mangle (or directly from Spanish), from a Caribbean language, possibly Taino, another Arawakan language, or and Cariban language. Noun, mangrove (mangroves)
  1. Any tropical evergreen trees or shrubs that grow in shallow coastal water.
  2. A habitat with such plants; mangrove forest; mangrove swamp.
  3. Plants of the Rhizophoraceae family.
  4. Trees of the genus Rhizophora.

23. The etymology of the word ida in ko + ψ + ida.


  • Ida = Mount Ida in Crete and Mount Ida in Phrygia. East or Easter.
  • Soul in the Greek language is soul, soul. Ps is represented by the Greek and Coptic letter Ψ (psi), and is represented by the Greek letter X (chi), ie ΨX (soul).
  • The etymology of the word Ψ, Translingual, Symbol Ψ sometimes used instead of ♆ for Neptune (Poseidon).
  • The etymology of the word X, English, From Christ by abbreviation, from Ancient Greek X (Kh, "(letter chi)"), from Christ (Khristós, "Christ"). Proper noun X (informal) Christ.
  • In Plato's Timaeus, the letter x (chi) is explained that the two bands that form the soul of the world cross each other like the letter X. 
  • Idas and Sidas also mean eternal soul. March. (Dag-ida), Kops-ida = Druid. Druid = Kops-ida (Dag-ida).
  • The etymology of the word Kops used for the word Kopsida, Greek cut (kick, cut). 
  • "Caesar" from the Latin verb "to cut," ie, Kops / Kops.
  • Etymology 2. ida, Spanish From the verb ir. Noun ida f (plural idas)
  1. going.
  2. march.
  • The etymology of the word ire, From Middle English ire, yre, shortened form of iren ("iron"). More at iron. 
  • Etymology 2. ire, From Middle English ire, from Old French ire ("ire"), from Latin ira ("wrath, rage"), from Proto-Indo-European * eis- (to fall upon act sharply) (compare "Old English Estimate", Old Norse eisa ("to race forward"), Ancient Greek hierós, "supernatural, holy", ostros, "frenzy; gadfly", Avestan aesma 'anger', Sanskrit eṣati 'it drives on'). 
  • Etymology 3. ire, Norwegian Bokmål. Noun ire m (defined singular iren, indefinite plural irer, defined plural irene)
  1. person from Ireland, Irishman. (References "ire" in The Bokmål Dictionary).
  • Etymology 3. ida, Maia, Noun ida
  1. ground.
  • The etymology of the word ground, Noun ground (countable and uncountable, plural grounds)
  1. (uncountable) The surface of the Earth.
  • Etymology 4. ida, Estonian From Proto-Finnic * itä, Noun ida (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])
  1. east.
  • The etymology of the word * itä, Proto-Finnic From Proto-Uralic * itä- ("to appear"), as the Sun "appears" (rises) in the east. Noun * itä.
  1. east.
  • Etymology 5. Ida, Short form of obsolete names beginning with Germanic "work", used for both sexes in medieval England. Derived terms
  1. Ida County. (Ellada)
  2. Ida Grove. (Copse)
  3. Idean. (Idaean Dactyls)
  • The etymology of the word Idean, English, Adjective Idean. 
  1. Of or related to (Mount) Ida. the Idean Hercules. Anagrams Adeni, Aiden, Diane, Edina.
  • The etymology of the word Diane, Middle English, Proper noun Diane.
  1. The Roman goddess of the hunt; Diana. (Diana Lucifera / Selene).
  2. (astronomy, sometimes capitalized). The celestial body closest to the Earth, considered to be a planet in the Ptolemic system as well as the boundary between Earth and the heavens; the Moon.
  • Etymology 6. ida, Latin, Alternative forms Īdē. (The Ides of March).
  • Etymology 7. Ida, English, Proper noun Ida
  1. A river in eastern Slovakia.
  • Etymology 8. ida, German, name of early female saints, shortened from compound given names beginning with Germanic element Ida-, Idu-. The meaning is debated, possibly cognate with the Old Norse ið ("work"). Since its renaissance in the 19th century also used as a diminutive of Adelaide. 
  • Etymology 9. ida, Latin, Proper noun Īda f (genitive Īdae); first declension.
  1. A mountain of Crete, where Jupiter (Zeus / Amun-Ra) was hidden by his mother
  2. A mountain located near Troy.
  • The etymology of the word Ῑ̓δᾱς used to for the word Kopsidas. Ῑ̓δᾱς, Ancient Greek, Proper noun Ῑ̓δᾱς • (Īdās) m (genitive Ῑ̓δᾱ); first declension
  1. Idas.
  • Descendants:
  1. Greek: Ida (Ídas)
  2. Latin: Īdās.
  • References;
  1. Slater, William J. (1969) Lexicon to Pindar, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter
  2.  Woodhouse, SC (1910) English-Greek Dictionary: A Vocabulary of the Attic Language [1], London: Routledge & Kegan Paul Limited, page 1.013.
  • The son of Apharus, the king of Messene, and brother of Lynkeus. "The gang" (Castor). Aphareus of Messenia was the son of Gorgophone and Perieres and brother of Leucippus. He was the husband of Arene, the daughter of Oebalus, and by her son Lynceus, Idas and Peisus (Pisus), though Idas' actual father was Poseidon.
  • The etymology of the word ko used to form the word ko + psi + da.
  • The etymology of the word ko, کوه, Persian, From Middle Persian (kof, "hill, mountain"), Noun, کوه • (khu) کوهها (kuh-hâ)) 1. mountain.
  • Etymology 2. kő, from Hungarian, Noun, kő (plural kövek) 1. stone.
  • Etymology 3. ko, from English, Noun, ko, 1. (game of Go) and the local shape to which the rule applies, and ko shape.
  • The etymology of the word, Go, (games) Ancient Chinese board game, played with 181 black stones and 180 white ones, typically on a board of 19 × 19 squares. 2. (game of Go) and stone in a ko in atari, and ko stone. Go, Anagram Og.
  • The etymology of the word Og, Proper noun Og, Popular supposed name for a caveman or other prehistoric man.
  • The etymology of the word atari, Basque, Noun, atari 1. gateway, doorway, portal.
  • Etymology 2. atari, from English Noun, Atari (video games) An Atari video game system or computer.
  • Etymology 4. ko, Danish, From Old Norse kür (East dialect ko, compare Swedish ko), from Proto-Germanic * kūz, from Proto-Indo-European * gʷṓws ("cow"). Noun, ko c (singular defined koen, plural indefinite køer) 1. cow.
  • Etymology 5. ko, from Guanano, Noun, ko 1. water. 2. medicine.
  • Etymology 6. ko, from Latvian, Pronoun ko (interrogative) what, who (accusative case of kas).
  • The etymology of the word kas, from French, Noun, kas 1. plural of ka.
  • The etymology of the word ka, English, From Egyptian k3, Noun, ka (plural kas) 1. A spiritual part of the soul in the Egyptian religion, which survived after death.
  • Etymology 7. ko, Norman, Alternative forms co, from Old French col, from Latin collum ("neck"). Noun, ko m (plural kos).
  • The etymology of the word kos, from Hungarian, Noun, kos (plural kosok) 1. ram (a male sheep)
  • The etymology of the word collum, English, Borrowing from Latin collum, Noun, Collum (colla) 1. (anatomy) A neck or cervix. 2. (anatomy) The neck. Homophone column.
  • Etymology 2nd column, an upright pillar, typically cylindrical, supporting an arch, entablature or other structure or standing alone as a monument, Synonyms, pillar, post, field, support, vertical, ballast, pier, pile, pilaster, stanchion, standard, prop, buttress; rod, shaft, leg, ointment, tower, pylon; obelisk, monolith; technicalnewel, caryatid / Karyatid, telamon, herm.
  • The etymology of the word cervix, 1. The lower, narrow part of the uterus where it joins with the top end of the vagina.
  • A herm is a square stone pillar with a carved head on top (typically of Hermes), used in ancient Greece as a boundary marker or a signpost.
  • Etymology 3rd Colum, Latin, From Proto-Indo-European * kwol-o- ("neck, literally" that's the head turns "); see also Middle Dutch and Old Norse halls ("neck"), from * kʷékklálos ("circle, wheel"). Noun, collum, 1. (anatomy), neck, throat. 2. upper stem of a plant.
  • The etymology of the word stem, English, from Old English stemn, stem (stem, trunk), from Proto-Germanic * stamniz. Noun, stem (stems) 1. The stock of a family; and race or generation of progenitors. 2. A branch of a family.
  • The etymology of the word dogs used to form the word ko + psi + das.
  • 1. The twenty-third letter of the Classical and Modern Greek alphabet and the twenty-fifth letter of the Old and Ancient Greek alphabet. (Ψ, ψ). 2. (uncountable, parapsychology) A form of psychic energy.
  • The etymology of the word Ψ, Translingual, Symbol, Ψ, sometimes used instead of ♆ for Neptune (Poseidon). 1. (astronomy) The symbol for Neptune. 2. (alchemy) bismuth.
  • The etymology of the word bismuth is English, from German Wismut, perhaps from weiß ("white") Masse ("mass"). Noun 1. A chemical element (symbol Bi) with an atomic number of 83. 2. (countable) A single atom of this element. 3. A very small amount; and whit.
  • The etymology of the word whit is Middle English, Adjective 1. white.
  • The etymology of the word atom is English, from the Latin Atomium, from the Latin atomus ("the smallest particle"), from Ancient Greek (átomos, "indivisible"), from a- (a-, not) + Cut (témnō, "I cut"). Noun, atom (plural atoms) 1. (chemistry, physics) The smallest possible amount of matter which still retains its identity as a chemical element, now known to consist of a nucleus surrounded by electrons.
  • The etymology of the word Neptune is English, From Latin Neptune, from Proto-Indo-European * nébʰos, ("cloud"), Sanskrit नभस् (nábhas), etc.) with the sense of "wet, wet." 1. (Roman mythology) The god of the ocean and earthquakes.
  • The etymology of the word Neptune is French, From Latin Neptunus. Proper noun, Neptune 1. Neptune (the god of the sea) 2. Neptune (planet). Neptune, Symbol, Black dog, Greek equivalent Poseidon. Egyptian equivalent Sobek. Irish equivalent Ler.
  • The etymology of the word da that forms the word ko + psi + da is from English, noun, da (plural das) - (Ireland, Scotland, Northern England) Father.
  • Etymology 2. yes. Dalmatian From Latin de ab. Compare Italian yes. Preposition da, 1. from. 2. of.
  • Etymology 3. yes. from Ewe, Noun da 1. bow 2. mother 3. snake.
  • Etymology 4. da. from North Frisian, Article da the (plural) See also di, jü.
  • The etymology of the word jü. from North Frisian Pronoun, jü 1. she.
  • Etymology 5. yes. Welsh, From Proto-Celtic * dagos ("good") (compare Irish dea-). Adjective da (female singular da, plural da, equative cystal, comparative gwell, superlative gorau), good, well. Noun da m, goodness (collective noun) goods, cattle.
  • Etymology 6. yes. Zhuang, Noun da 1. eye. North Frisian, Article, See also di, jü, dåt. Ojibwe, Particle, Related terms, daga. Scottish Gaelic, Prepositional Pronunciation, yes, Alternative form of dha.
  • The etymology of the word daga is Hiligaynon, From Spanish daga, Noun, dag, 1st clay, clay soil 2. sacrifice, specifically human sacrifice.
  • The etymology of the word dha, from Scottish Gaelic, dha, to it.
  • Etymology 7. da, from Spanish, Verb da, Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) Present indicative form of gift.
  • Etymology 8. da, from Vanimo, Noun, da 1. pig. English, Noun, da (plural das) (Ireland, Scotland, Northern England) Father. Synonyms pa, Pa. See also, grandpa, ma. Basque, Noun, pa 1. kiss. Catalan pa, From Old Provençal, from Latin pānis. Mr. Pan is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, the nature of the mountain wilds and the rustic music, and the companion of the nymphs (sida). The Lord is associated with the mother goddess Rhea and Cybele.
  • The etymology of the word pa, Dakota, Noun, pa 1. head.
  • Etymology 9. da, from Basque, Verb, to the third person singular present indicative of isan; He / She Is (Isis). Cebuano, Initial clipping of ada (related words, gonadal-1, Lef-k-ada, Ell-ada, Kaumodaki g-ada, Dagh-ada-kopsida).
  • The etymology of the word 's' used to form the word Kopsida + s is Egyptian, Noun, (hiero_O34) 1. A door bolt of wood or copper [since Pyramid Texts].
  • Etymology 2. 's', from Egyptian, Noun, man (male person) [Descendants-Coptic: ⲥⲁ- (ⲥⲁ-)] 1. Being, (used of a snake) [Pyramid Texts].
  • Etymology 3. 's', from Egyptian, Noun, 1. A type of fish [22nd dynasty].
  • Etymology 4. 's', from Egyptian, Noun, 1. A cloth.
  • Etymology 5. 's', from Egyptian, Noun, 1. A type of goose, especially as a offering for the dead [Old Kingdom].
  • Etymology 6. 's', from Serbo-Croatian, Abbreviation, with (Cyrillic spelling with) 1. (grammar) neuter gender (srednji rod).
  • Etymology 7. 's', from Swedish, Abbreviation 's', 1st page; Abbreviation of sida.
  • Sidcup, ie, Sidkop / KopSid, is a district of south-east London, England, primarily in the London Borough of Bexley. Located 18.3 miles (18.2 km) south of Charing Cross, it borders the London Boroughs of Bromley and Greenwich. According to Edward Hasted, "Thomas de Sedkopp (Sedkop / Kopsed / Kopsid) was the owner of this estate in the 35th year of King Henry VI. [Ie, in the 1450s] as appears by his deed." A number of manor houses, converted to other uses, remain. They include Frognal House, the birthplace and residence of Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney, after which Sydney, Australia was named.

Kop also means hoofd from Middle Dutch hover, hooft, from Old Dutch hōvit, from Proto-Germanic * haubudą, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European * kauput-, * kaput-. Low German Höft, German Haupt, West Frisian Haed (Head), English Head, Danish Hood. Hoved from Old Norse hoffuð, haufuð, from Proto-Germanic * hafudą or * habudą, northern form of * haubudą, from Proto-Indo-European * kauput-, * kaput- ("head").

These are derived terms from the meaning of "the head of a body." The prefix "hoofd-" means "main, head (kick), chief," so words derived from that meaning are listed on the hoofd. For example, a chief (head / kick) of a state.

Hoved also means a person. From Anglo-Norman parsone, persoun et al. ("Human being", a natural person, "man"), a French person, displaced native wight ("person, human being.") In Christianity, any one of the three hypostases of the Holy Trinity: God the Father, God the Son, or God the Holy Spirit as contrasted with the unity of Godhead (GodKop).

Hypostases are also the single person of Jesus, as contrasted with his dual human and divine nature and also can mean "A triple bible."

A triple deity (sometimes referred to as threefold, triple, triple, triple, triple or triadic, or as a Trinity is a deity associated with the number three (3) or 3 + 3 + 3 or 3x3x3.

Some examples of triple deities; the goddess Artemis, Selene, Hecate. Aphrodite Urania, Aphrodite Pontia, Aphrodite Pandemos. Hathor, Nephthys, Isis. Ériu, Fódla, Banba. The Morrigan. Zeus, Athena, and Apollo. Osiris (husband), Isis (wife), and Horus (son), Hathor, Wadjet, Set, Khonsu. The Theban triad of Amun, Mut, and Khonsu (Yahweh). Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and Protestantism believe in God as the Trinity, including God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. The Gnostic text of the three forms of Divine Thought: The Father, The Son, and The Mother. Danu, Brigid. Bodb Armenian Femen ('of the Mound on Femen'). Lord Shiva. Vishnu. Brahma. Bahuchara Mata. Rudra. The Lingam. Venus Genetrix. The Roman Capitoline Trio of Jupiter (father), Juno (wife), and Minerva (daughter). Ops. The Roman pleibian triad of Ceres,

The Matres or Matronae are usually represented as a group of three but sometimes with as many as 27 (3 × 3 × 3) inscriptions.

The Matres were associated with maternity and fertility.


Kopsida means Bodb Derg, Bodb Sida Femen ('of the Mound on Femen').


Bodb Derg (Atlas/Karyatid) was a son of the Dagda and Dagda's successor as King of the Tuatha Dé Danann.


He is the half sister of Brigid (Karya/Atlas/Bodb Derg, Bodb Sida Femen).


The etymology of the word Bodb comes from bo + db.


  • Etymology 1st bo, English, and shortening of boy.
  • Etymology 2nd bo, Afrikaans, Noun, bos bosse, diminutive bossie

  1. wood, forest
  2. bush, shrub
  3. bunch, bundle, sheaf, bouquet.

  • Etymology 1st bos, Cornish, Alternative forms.
  1. bones.
  • Verb bos

  1. that be.
  • Etymology 2nd bos, Czech, Adverb, bos

  1. (literary) barefoot, barefooted.
  • Etymology 3rd bos, Dalmatian, possibly from Latin buxus ("box tree"). Noun, bos m

  1. oak tree.
  • Etymology 4. Dutch, bos, een bos (n, a forest) From Middle Dutch bosch, busch, from Old Dutch * busk, from Proto-Germanic * buskaz. Noun, bos n (plural bossen, diminutive bosje n)

  1. wood, forest.
  • Etymology 5. bos, Friulian, From Latin buxus, from Ancient Greek pox (púxos). Noun, bos m (plural bos)

  1. box (tree)
  2. boxwood.
  • Etymology 6. bos, Irish, From Old Irish bass, bos (palm), from Proto-Celtic * bostā ("palm, fist"), from Proto-Indo -European * gstavosto-, * gʷosdʰo- ("branch"). Noun bos f (genitive singular boise, nominative plural bosa)

  1. anatomy) palm of the hand.
  • Etymology 7. bos, Kristang, From Portuguese vós ("ye"), from Old Portuguese vos, from Latin vōs ("ye").
  • Pronouns bos

  1. you; thou.
  • Etymology 8. bos, Latin, borrowed from Osco-Umbrian, most probably Sabellic (vs. expected Latin ** ūs ~ ** vōs), from Proto-Italic * gʷōs; ultimately from Proto-Indo-European * gʷṓws, which also gave Ancient Greek bos (boûs), Sanskrit गो (go) (nominative singular gaús), and English cow. Noun, bós m, f (genitive bovis); third declension

  1. and cow, bull, or ox.
  • Hyponyms taurus.
  • Etymology 9. bos, Tok Pisin, English boss, Noun, bos

  1. boss; overseer; master.
  • Etymology 3rd bo, From Japanese 棒 (bō), from Middle Chinese 棒 (bǽwng, "staff, club").
  • Etymology 4th, Afrikaans, From Dutch boven, Adverb bo

  1. above.
  • Etymology 5. bo, Catalan, From Old Occitan bon, from Latin bonus, from Old Latin duenos, later duonus, from Proto-Italic * dwenos, from Proto-Indo-European * dew- ("to show favor, revere"). Numerous cognates include French bon and Portuguese bom. Adjective bo (feminine bona, male plural bons, feminine plural bones)

  1. good.
  • See also bé, ben (benben). Benben was the mound that emerged from the primordial waters Nu upon which the creator deity Atum settled in the creation myth of the Heliopolitan form of ancient Egyptian religion. The Benben stone (also known as a pyramid) is the top stone of the pyramid. It is also related to the Obelisk.

  • Etymology 6th, Cuiba Noun bo

  1. home, house.
  • Etymology 7. Bo, Danish, From Old Norse, Old Norse búa ("to reside"). Noun bo n (singular defined boet, plural indefinite boer)
  1. estate (the property of a deceased person)
  2. day, nest
  3. abode, home.
  • Etymology 8th, From Old Norse bea ("to reside").
  • Verb bo (imperative bo, infinitive at bo, present tense bor, past tense boe, perfect tense har boet)

  1. live, reside, dwell.
  • Etymology 9. bo, Duvle, Noun bo
  1. threads.
  • Etymology 10th, Friulian, From Latin bós, bóvem, probably through Vulgar Latin * boem. Noun bo m (plural bûs)

  1. ox.
  • Etymology 11th, Gunwinggu, Noun, b

  1. water
  2. liquid.
  • Etymology 12th, Nabak, Noun, b

  1. pig.
  • Etymology 12. Bo, Norwegian Bokmål, Noun

  • bo n (defined singular boe, indefinite pl pl, defined plural boa or boene)

  1. one's home (mostly idiomatic)
  2. estate.

  • Synonyms

  1. (one's home): bolig, hjem / heim
  2. (estate): euendom, gods.
  • The etymology of the word, Norwegian Bokmål, From Middle Low German eigendom
  • Noun euendom m (defined singular eiendommen, indefinite plural eiendommer, defined plural eiendommene)

  1. a property (real estate)
  2. property (something that someone owns).

  • Etymology 13th, Norwegian Bokmål, From Danish bo from Old Norse búa ("to prepare, finish, make preparations, equip"), cognate with Old English būan, Old Frisian buwa, Old Saxon būan and Old High German būan German bauen).
  • Alternative forms bu (Nynorsk also) Verb bo (imperative bo, present tense boron, simple past point, past participle point, present participle boende)

  1. to live (have permanent residence), stay.
  2. to be, to dwell, to be in.
  • Etymology 14. bo, Sranan Tongo, Borrowed from English bow. Noun bo

  1. bow, arch.

The etymology of the word db used to form the word Bodb, bo + db (Bodb Sidi ar Femen).


  • Etymology 1. db, Egyptian, Possibly and the doublet of ꜥb ("horn"). Noun
  1. horn.

The etymology of the word derg used to form the words Bodb Derg.


  • Etymology 1. derg, Old Irish, From Proto-Celtic * dergos ("red, crimson"), from Proto-Indo-European * dʰerg- ("to dim, darken"); compare Old English deorc ("dark") and Tocharian A tärkär, tocharian B tarkär ("cloud"). Adjective derg, red

  1. Synonyms: flann, rúad.
  • The etymology of the word flann, Irish, from Middle-Irish flann, from Proto-Celtic * wlannos, from Proto-Indo-European * welh3- ("to strike, hit"). Related to fuil ("blood"). Adjective flann (singular genitive flainn genitive, singular female flain genitive, plural flanna, comparative flainne)

  1. blood-red.
  • Etymology 2. flann, Middle Irish, From Proto-Celtic * wlannos, from Proto-Indo-European * welh3- ("to strike, hit"). Related to fuil ("blood").
  • The etymology of the word fuil, Irish, From Middle Irish fuil, from Old Irish fuil. Noun, fuil f (singular genitive fola, nominative plural fola)

  1. blood.
  • Etymology 2. fuil, From Old Irish fil, originally an imperative meaning 'see', from Proto-Indo-European * wel- (see, cognate with Welsh gweld, ). For the semantic development 'see here'> 'here is' compare French voice and voilà. Verbfuil

  1. present indicative analytic of bi.
  • The etymology of the word bi, Irish, From Old Irish bí, from Proto-Indo-European * bʰuH- ("to grow, become, come into being, appear").
  • Derived terms: bí ann ("exist", verb, literally "be there").
  • Etymology 2. Bi, Old Irish, Descendants, The following forms are descended from the imperative:

  1. Irish: bí
  2. Manx: bee
  3. Scottish Gaelic: bi.
  • Etymology 3. bi, English, From bisexual.
  • Coordinate terms pan.
  • The etymology of the word pan, English.
  1. (geography) and specific type of lake, natural depression or basin. They are sometimes associated with desert areas.
  2. A loaf of bread.
  3. The skull, considered as a vessel containing the brain; the brainpan.
  4. The hard stratum of earth that lies below the soil; hardpan.
  • See also tripod.
  • Etymology 2. Pan, English, Compare French pan ("skirt, lappet"), Latin pannus ("a cloth, rag").
  • Etymology 3, pan, A leaf of gold or silver.
  • Etymology 4th, French,
  1. side, face.
  • Etymology of the word side, from the Middle English side, from the Old English sīde ("side, flank"), from Proto-Germanic * sīd ("side, flank, edge, shore" - ("to send, throw, drop, sow, deposit"). Cognate with the West Frisian side, Dutch side, German Side, Danish and Norwegian side, Swedish side.
  • Etymology 2. Side, Middle Irish, From Old Irish. Noun side.

  1. and fairy hill or mound
  2. (in plural) = áes side ("people of the fairy mounds, supernatural beings, fairies")
  • Descendants of Irish Network.
  • The Etymology of the Word, From Middle Irish Side, Alternative forms
  1. sidhe (superseded)
  2. siedh (superseded)
  • Noun network (genitive singular network, nominative plural network).
  1. fairy mound, tumulus.
  • The aos is the Irish term for a supernatural race comparable. They are said to live underground in fairy mounds, across the western sea, or in an invisible world that coexists with the world of humans. This world is a parallel universe in which the aos walks among the living. In the Irish language, aos network means "people of the mounds" (the mounds are known in Irish as "the seat"). In modern Irish, the people of the mounds are also called daoine sídhe, in Scottish mythology they are daoine sìth. They are variously said to be the ancestors, the spirits of nature, or goddesses and gods.
  • Etymology 3rd Side, Norwegian Bokmål, From Old Norse Network.
  • The etymology of the word sieða, Old Norse, From Proto-Germanic * sīd, where also Old English sīde, Old High German sīta. Network Noun

  1. side
  • Side-Swedish: sida.
  • Etymology 5th, Galician, From Old Galician Old Portuguese, from Latin pānis, pānem. Cognate with Portuguese pão. (uncountable) bread
  1. a piece of bread

  • Synonym: peza

  1. (dated) horn, cereal
  2. (by extension) food
  • Etymology 6. Mr., Malay, Noun, Mr.

  1. grandmother.
  • Etymology 7th, Polish, 14th c. Unknown etymology. West Slavic word. From Proto-Slavic * gupan, from Iranian source. Cognate to Old Czech hpan, modern Czech master and pan, Slovak master and Lower Sorbian Mr.. Mr. m pers

  1. gentleman, man
  2. master, teacher
  3. lord
  • Etymology 8th, Spanish, See also mono and vino - Wine (Dionysus).
  • Etymology 9th century, In ancient Greek religion and mythology. Lord is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, the nature of the mountain wilds, the rustic music and the impromptus, and the companion of the nymphs. He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat.
  • The etymology of the word mono, Anagrams

  1. Moon, moon, nomo-
  • The etymology of the word nomo-, English Prefix nomo-

  1. law.
  • Etymology 2. mono, Spanish, Adjective mono (female mona singular, masculine plural monos, feminine plural monas)

  1. (Spain, colloquial) cute, pretty

  •  Synonyms: bonito, cuqui

  1. (Colombia, colloquial) blond, blonde.
  • Etymology 4. bi, Noun bi (plural bi)

  1. A type of jade disc produced in ancient China.
  • The bi is a type of circular ancient Chinese jade artifact. The earliest bi were produced in the Neolithic period, especially by the Liangzhu culture (3400-2250 BCE).
  • Etymology 5. Bi, Basque, Numeral bi

  1. two.
  • Etymology 6. bi, Bura, Noun bì

  1. bin for grain storage.
  • Etymology 7. bi, Danish, Noun bi c (singular defined bien, plural indefinite bier)

  1. bee.
  • Etymology 8. bi, Isthmus Zapotec, Noun, bi

  1. wind.
  • Etymology 9. bi, Kalasha, From Sanskrit बीज (bīja), from Proto-Indo-Iranian * bíHĵam. Cognate with Konkani बी (bī) and Parachi bīz ("seed-corn"). Noun bi

  1. and seed
  2. seeds
  3. moth larva
  • Etymology 10. bi, Scottish Gaelic, From Old Irish bí (imperative singular of at), from Proto-Celtic * buyo-, from Proto-Indo-European * bʰuH-, Verb bi bhith)

  1. be, exist.
  • See also is. (is is).
  • Etymology 11. bi, Solon From Proto-Tungusic * bi. Cognate with Evenki would be (bi), Manchu ᠪᡳ (bi, Pronoun bi

  1. I.
  • Etymology 12. bi, Zaghawa, Noun, bi

  1. water.
  • Etymology 13. bi, Zhuang, From Proto-Tai * piːᴬ ("year"). Cognate with Thai ปี (bpii), Northern Thai, Lao ປີ (pī), Lü ᦔᦲ (ṗii), Shan ပီ (pǐi), Tai Nüa ᥙᥤ (pi), Ahom (pii) Noun bi,     
  1. year
  2. year old.
  • Etymology 3. fuil, Scottish Gaelic, from Middle Irish fuil, from Old Irish fuil. Noun fuil f (genitive singular fala, no plural)

  1. blood
  2. family, tribe, kindred
  3. bloodshed
  4. wound
  5. breeding
  6. temper, nature.
  • Etymology 2. derg, Zazaki, Adjective, derg (comparative dehana derg, superlative zaf derg)

  1. long.
  2. tall.


The etymology of the word 'ar' used in the name 'Bodb Sidi ar Femen' (for the etymology of the word sida see above).


  • Etymology 1st ar, English, Noun ar ars.
  1. The name of the Latin-script letter R / r.
  • The etymology of the word ars, Latin, From Proto-Indo-European * h₂r̥tís ("fitting"), from the root * h2er- ("to join"). Cognates include Avestan (arəiti, "reward") and Ancient Greek örti (árti, "just, exactly"). Related to gun. Noun, ars f (genitive artis); third declension.
  1. art, skill
  2. craft, power.
  • Etymology 2nd ars, Middle English, From Old English ærs, ears, from Proto-Germanic * arsaz, from Proto-Indo-European * h3érsos. Noun, burned.

  1. burned, anus.
  2. bottom, buttocks.
  • Interjection, ar

  1. (Britain, West Country, West Midlands) Alternative form of arr.
  • The etymology of the word arr, Possibly from aye. (1905-1956) in the films Treasure Island (1950) and Blackbeard the Pirate (1952) - and the former's spin-off media-in which he played, respectively, the fictional pirate Long John Silver and the historical pirate Edward "Blackbeard" Teach (c.1680 - 1718, also a West Country native). Possibly from aye.

  • Synonyms: (yes): ay, aye, ya, yeah, yeah, yep, yes.
  • The etymology of the word ya, English, Reduced form of you. Compare Dutch is a reduced / unstressed form of jij ("you").
  • The etymology of the word is, Haitian Creole, Noun, is.

  1. eye.
  • Etymology 2nd is, German from Old High German io.
  • Io was a priestess of the Goddess Hera in Argos. The Ancients Connected Io with the Moon (Isis)
  • Etymology 2. ya, Alternative forms, yaa, yaw, yah.
  • The etymology of the word Yah, Yah, English, Proper noun Yah

  1. Alternative form of Jah.
  • The etymology of the word Jah, Proper noun, Jah

  1. (religion) A shortened form of Yahweh, God's personal name in the Bible. Often appearing as part of Biblical names as "-iah," or "His-" as in Isaiah, Jeremiah, Jehoshua, and Jehosaphat, and Hebrew words like הַלְּלוּיָהּ ("hallelujah").
  2. (Rastafarianism) God.
  • See also:

  1. Jehovah
  2. Yahweh
  3. Tetragrammaton.
  • Etymology 2nd ar, Anagrams, RA, Ra.
  • The etymology of the word Ra, Proper noun, Ra

  1. (Egyptian mythology) The Egyptian god of the sun.
  • Synonyms Re.
  • Coordinate terms

  1. Amun
  2. Aten
  3. Atum
  4. Khepri
  5. Khnum.
  • Derived terms

  1. Amun-Ra
  2. Ra-Horakhty
  3. Raet-Tawy.
  • Etymology 3rd ar, Albanian, Borrowed from Latin aurum. Noun ar m (defined singular ari)

  1. gold

  • Synonym: flower-flower.
  • Etymology 1. ari, Back-formation from the plural arinj, inherited plural of Old Albanian ar 'be', shortening of * arth, where -th was mistaken for a diminutive suffix, from Proto-Albanian * artsa, from Proto-Indo-European * h₂ŕ̥tḱos. In the clusters of two stops (here: t), the first element was regularly lost in Proto-Albanian. Noun, ari m (indefinite plural arinj, defined singular ariu, defined plural arinjtë)

  1. bear.
  • Etymology 2. ari, Borôro, Noun, ari

  1. moon.
  • Etymology 3. ari, Catalan, Adjective, ari (feminine ària, masculine plural aris, feminine plural àries)

  1. Aryan.

  • Noun, ari m (plural aris, feminine ària)

  1. Aryan.

  • Etymology 4. ari, Icelandic, From Old Norse ari, from Proto-Germanic * arô, from Proto-Indo-European * h3érō. Proto-Germanic preserved and zero-grade -n-suffix. This form is an Old Norse regularization as an an-stem) masculine noun. Compare the doublet örn, which was inherited from the same Proto-Germanic word but regularized as a u-stem similarly to björn. Noun, ari m (singular genitive ara, nominative plural arar).

  1. (poetic) eagle.
  • Synonyms (eagle): örn
  • Etymology 5. ari, Ilocano, From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian, compare Maori ariki. Noun ari

  1. king.
  • Etymology 6. ari, Iranun, From Proto-Philippine * huaji, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian * huaji, from Proto-Austronesian * Suaji. Noun ari

  1. sibling ((younger) person who shares the same parents).
  • Etymology 7. ari, Malay, Noun, ari (Jawi spelling اري, plural ari-ari)
  • The etymology of the word ari-ari, Javanese, Noun, ari-ari (Javanese spelling ꦲꦫꦶꦲꦫꦶ)

  1. afterbirth.
  • Etymology 8. ari, Quechua, Noun, ari

  1. edge, sharpness.
  • Etymology 9. Tagalog, Noun, ari

  1. property, ownership
  2. (vulgar slang) and private part; the private parts; genitals.
  • Etymology 10. ari, Uzbek, From Proto-Turkic * ără ("wasp, bee"); compare Turkish Turkish and Turkmen ary. Noun, ari (plural arilar)

  1. bee
  • ari or Are / Ares is the Hellenic god of war.
  • Etymology 4th, Aromanian, Alternative forms aru. Verb ar (third-person singular indicative present, past participle shows)

  1. I plough.
  • The etymology of the word aru, Tahitian, Noun, aru

  1. forest.
  • Etymology 5th, Basque Noun, ar
  1. male.
  • Etymology 6th, Cimbrian, Noun, ar m

  1. maple, maple tree.
  • Etymology 7. ar, Dutch, Noun, ar m, f (plural arren, diminutive arretje n)

  1. (obsolete) sledge.
  • The etymology of the word sledge, English, Noun, sledge (sledges)

  1. A low sled drawn by animals, typically on snow, ice or grass.
  • Etymology 8th, Galician, From Old Portuguese, from Latin aēr. Noun ar m (plural ares)

  1. air.
  • Etymology 9th, Kalasha, Noun, ar

  1. awl.
  • Anagrams, Law, WAL, Law.
  • Etymology 10th, Khasi, From Proto-Mon-Khmer * ɓaar, ar

  1. two.
  • Etymology 11. ar, Kurdish, Noun,

  1. flour.
  2. threads.
  3. shame, disgrace.
  4. has (square decametre, 100 m²)
  • Abbreviation of argon.
  • The etymology of the word argon, From Ancient Greek argon (argon), neuter of argos. From Proto-Indo-European * h2er- ("white"). Cognates includes Old Irish Silver (Silver), Welsh arian ("silver"), Sanskrit अर्जुन (árjuna, "White, Clear"), Avestan (ərəzata, "Silver" Old Persian 𐎠𐎼𐎭𐎫 (ardata, "silver"), and possibly Old Armenian արծաթ (arcat').
  • Adjective ergos • (argós) m (feminine arrogance, neuter ergon); first / second declension

  1. white, bright.
  • The etymology of the word argos / Argos, Greek, From Ancient Greek ργος (Árgos). Proper noun, Argos • (Árgos) n

  1. Argos (town in Argolis in Greece).
  • Etymology 12th, Old English, Noun, ār f

  1. honor, glory, grace.
  • Etymology 13th, From Proto-Germanic * aiz. Cognate with Old Norse eir ("brass, copper"), German ehern ("metal, of iron"), Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐌶 (aiz, "ore"), from Proto-Indo-European * áyos, h₂éyos. Compare Dutch oer ("iron-holding earth"). Confer Latin aes (bronze, copper), Avestan (aiiah), Sanskrit अयस् (áyas, "copper, iron"). Noun, ār n

  1. hours, brass, copper.
  • Etymology 14th, From Proto-Germanic * airuz. Cognate with Old Saxon, Old Norse árr, Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐍂𐌿𐍃 (airus). Noun ār m

  1. messenger, herald.
  2. angel.
  3. missionary.
  • Etymology 15th, Westrobothnian, Noun, ar m (defined singular aren)

  1. eagle.


The etymology of the word 'Femen comes from Fe + men' and is used in the name of 'The Mound on Femen'.

  • Etymology 1. fe, from Spanish, From Latin fidēs. Fides (Latin: Fidēs) was the goddess of trust and bona fides (good faith) in the ancient Roman religion.
  • The etymology of the word fidēs, Latin, From Proto-Indo-European * bʰeydʰ- ("to command, to persuade, to trust"). Cognate to Latin fīdō ("I trust") and Proto-Germanic * bīdaną. Noun, fidēs f (genitive fideī); fifth declension. 1. faith, belief. 2. reliance. 3. confidence, trust.
  • Etymology 2nd of the word fe, Albanian, Noun, fe f (indefinite pl, singular feja, defined plée) 1. religion.
  • Etymology 3. of the word fe, from Catalan, Noun, fe f (fes) 1. faith.
  • Etymology 4th of the word fe, Danish, From French fée ("fairy"), from Late Latin fāta, from Latin fātum ("destiny, fate"). Noun, fe c (singular defined feen, plural indefinite feer), fairy, fay (mythical being (of female gender).

  • The phrase "fuego", from French to English, from English to French, from English to French, "), From Proto-Indo-European * paḱ- (" to fasten, place "). Akin to Old Frisian fōgia ("to join"), Old Saxon fōgian ("to join"), Middle Low German fögen ("to join, add"), ("To connect"), Old English fōn ("to catch"). More at fang. Verb fay (third-person singular simple present fays, simple past and past participle fayed)

  1. It fit.
  2. To join or join closely or tightly. quotations.
  3. It lies close together.

  • Middle English faie, fei ("a place or person possessed with magical properties"), from Middle French feie, fee ("fairy", "fae"). More at fairy. Noun, fay 1. A fairy.
  • The aos is the Irish term for a supernatural race in Irish mythology and Scottish mythology (usually pronounced the same), comparable to the fairies or elves. aos network means "people of the mounds" (the mounds are known in the Irish as "the seat").

  • Etymology 5. fe, Gwahatike, Noun, fe 1. water.
  • Etymology 6. fe, Norwegian Bokmål, From Old Norse fé, from Proto-Germanic * fehu. Noun, fe n (defined singular feet, indefinite plural fe, defined plural fea or feene) 1. cattle, livestock.
  • Etymology 7. Fe, Welsh, Synonyms mi (North Wales).
  • The etymology of the word mi, from Vietnamese, Related terms tau.
  • The etymology of the word tau, English, borrowed from Ancient Greek. Noun tau (plural taus). The letter T / t in the Greek, Hebrew and ancient Semitic alphabets, being the nineteenth letter of the Classical and Modern Greek, the twenty-first letter of Old and Ancient Greek. 1. A T-shaped sign or structure;
  • Etymology 2. mi, Amele, Noun, mi 1. louse.
  • The etymology of the word louse, English, Anagrams, Seoul.
  • The etymology of the word Seoul, Proper noun, Seoul 1. the capital city of South Korea. Homophones: sole, soul.

  • Etymology 3rd mi, Aromanian, From Latin me, accusative singular of ego. Compare Romanian me
  • Etymology 4. mi, from Italian, Related terms, io.
  • An etymology of the word io, io, English, From Ancient Greek Ἰω (Iṓ) Proper noun, 1. (Greek mythology) The daughter of Inachus river god, and a lover of Zeus, turned by the latter into a heifer.
  • Io is also known as Demeter / Ops / Isis / Brigid / Cybele.


The etymology of the word men comes from the word fe + men.


  • Etymology 1. men, From Middle English men, from Old English menn ("men, people, human beings collectively"), From Proto-Germanic * manniz, nominative plural of Proto-Germanic * mann. Cognate with German Men (Men), Danish Men (Men), Swedish Men (Men). More at man.
  • Etymology 2. men, English, Noun men, 1. plural form of man 1. (collective) 2. (The) people, humanity.
  • Etymology 3rd Men, Haitian Creole, Noun, Men 1st Hand.
  • Etymology 4. men, Macugan, Noun, men 1. water. 2. river.
  • Etymology 5. men, Faroese, Noun, men f (genitive singular menar, plural menir or menar) 1. (rare, Mykines) The spinal cord (Osiris).
  • The etymology of the word Mykines comes from the modern Greek name for Mycenae. In the second millennium BC, Mycenae was one of the major centers of Greek civilization and a military stronghold that dominated much of southern Greece. Synonyms (common).
  • Mona is the anglicized form of Gaelic Muadhnait, from muadh "noble."
  • The etymology of the word mona, Old English, Noun, móna m (nominative plural mōnan) 1. moon.
  • The etymology of the word mona, Pali, Noun, mona n 1. wisdom.
  • The etymology of the word Mona (Mona, modern-day Anglesey, Ynys Môn in Welsh)



ARAVANI


My mother's maiden name is Aravani. 

My father's grandmother's maiden name is also Aravani.

The etymology of the word

"A" is used to form the word A + ra + vani.

  • Etymology 1. A - from Abaum Noun, House. House, This dwell within one of the twelve astrological houses. Synonyms accommodate, harbor / harbor, guest. 
  • Etymology 2. A - from Ama, Noun, Tree.
  • Etymology 3. A - from Chuukese, pronoun, he, she, it.
  • Etymology 4. A - from Danish, preposition, of, each, each containing. 
  • Etymology 5. A - from Dutch, Noun, a stream or water 


The etymology of the word "ra" used to form the word A + ra + vani.


  • Etymology 1. Ra-Ra is the primary name of the god god of Ancient Egypt. 
  • Etymology 2. Ra - from Dalmatian, noun, King. 
  • Etymology 3. Ra - from Malagasy, Noun, blood.
  • Etymology 4. Ra - from Maltese, verb, see. 

  • The etymology of the word see. See, English, From Old French Sie ("seat, throne; town, capital; episcopal see"), from the Latin seat ("seat"), referring to the bishop's throne or chair; related to the Latin verb sit ("to sit").
  • Etymology 2. See, noun, A dyke, archdiocese; and a region of a church, generally headed by a bishop, especially an archbishop.
  • The office of a bishop or archbishop; bishopric or archbishopric.
  • A seat; a site; and place where sovereign power is exercised.
  • Derived terms, Holy See.


The etymology of the word "vani" used to form the word A + ra + vani

  • Etymology 1. Vani - from Icelandic, Synonyms venja. 
  • The etymology of the word venja is from Dalmatia, vine yard.
  • The etymology of the word vineyard, vine + yard.
  • The etymology of the word comes from English, the climbing plant that produces grapes.
  • The etymology of the word yard is English, From Middle English yard, ȝerd, mime, from Old English ġeard ("yard, garden, fence, enclosure, enclosed, court, residence, dwelling, home, region, hedge") .
  • Etymology 2. Yard, From Middle English yerd, from, old, English, greek (Anglian) ġerd ("branch, staff, scepter, measuring stick, yardland"), from * gazdjō, from * gazdaz . Cognate with Dutch fence ("twig"), German Gerte and probably related to Latin hasta ("spear"). Yard, Noun, A branch, twig, or shoot. A staff, a rod, a scepter, or a stick. A penis. The rood. 
  • The etymology of the word rood. Rood is English, From Middle English rood, from Old English ród ("a rod, field, land measure, square of land of square rod, and cross (Atlantis Cross), rood (as in Holy-rood), gallows , and Proto-Germanic * rōdō, * rōdčina ("rod, field"), from Proto-Indo-European * rōt-, * rehtt- ( "Bar, beam, stem"). Cognate with German Rute ("rod, cane, field"), Norwegian roda ("gender"). Largely displaced by cross (Atlantis Cross).

  1. The etymology of the Holyrood. Christianity, A relic believed to be part of the True Cross (The Atlantis Cross).
  2. An area of ​​Edinburgh, the home of the Scottish Parliament. (by extension, by metonymy) the Scottish Parliament.
  3. Aravani means "Tree of Life", House of Horus ie Shiva / Isis / Osiris / Set / Nephthys / Horus / Ra / Amun / Wadjet / Iusaaset / Yahweh and all came out of the House of the Kop Sida. 

  • The etymology of the word vane (A + ra + vane) is Danish, From Old Norse vani. 1. a habit, custom.
  • The etymology of the word "custom" is derived from the English standard, from English-French, from Old French to Latin, from Latin to Latin, , habituate "), from con- (" with ") + suēscō (" become used or accustomed "), perhaps from suus (" one's own, his own "); see consuetude. Displaced native Middle English wune, wone ("custom, habit, practice") ("Custom, habit, practice, rite"), Middle English side, sid (The Tuatha Dé Danann) ) ("custom, choice, preference") (from "Old English Cyrus", "custom, choice, preference").
  • The etymology of the word vane is English, From Middle English vane, the Southern variant of fane, from Old English fana ("cloth, banner, and flag"), from Proto-Germanic * fans. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Foone ("flag, banner") and German Fahne. Compare fane. Noun, vane (plural vanes).

  1. Any of the several relatively thin, rigid, flat, or sometimes curved surfaces radially mounted along an axis like a blade in a turbine or a sail on a windmill that is turned or used to turn a fluid.
  2. (ornithology) The flattened, web-like part of a feather, consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaft.
  3. Sight on a sextant or compass.
  4. (countable) A weather vane. A weather vane, a wind blower, or weathercock is an instrument for showing the direction of the wind. Although partly functional, weathervanes are decorative, often featuring the traditional cockerel design with letters indicating the points of the compass. 













More than twenty-five thousand years ago, in the middle of an isolated island called Tir na nóg, at the top of a hill (Nion) stood a dwelling sanctuary (Jerusalem).

The etymology of the word Nion


The earlier Gods/Humans were hermaphrodites, they reproduced themselves without the help of any mate.


A hermaphrodite is an organism that has reproductive organs normally associated with both male and female sexes enabling a form of sexual reproduction in which both partners can act as the "female" or "male".

In this paradise, Tir on nóg (Atlantis / Karya), there was no sickness and no death, instead, being a place of everlasting life and beauty.

Everlasting life also refers to the eternal soul (Sida).

The beings on Tir na nóg (Atlantis/Karya) the banshee/ben side / ban-sidhe, CopseSida/KopSida, The Tuatha Dé Danann have everlasting souls (Sidas). 

Extending the center of Tir na nóg (Atlantis/Karya) were arable hills (Kops) full of rich soil along with forest-land, and near the fertile plain stood a large mountain (Kop/Nion).

The sanctuary at the center of the island was encircled with a wall of gold, called Atlantis/Karya (Wal-Nut), and it was reserved as Holy Ground.


Also around the sanctuary (Atlantis/Karya/Wal-Nut/Jerusalem) were rings of water and land.

The roof of the royal palace was made of ivory, the columns and the floor were variegated gold and silver.

There was a golden statue of God standing in a chariot and driving six (6) winged steeds (Pegasus/KopSida/Aaravani/Souls).

There and the divine child was born, the Dagda.

This sanctuary of Jerusalem was the very place where the original royal lines were generated and brought to birth.

The firstborn divine child from the Dagda was Bodb Derg/Bodb Sidi ar Femen, 'of the Mound on Femen' (Kop Sida).


Bodb Derg/Bodb Sie ar Femen is the incarnation of the Dagda.

Feman was a plain on Tir na nóg (Atlantis/Karya) named after the two oxen owned by Brigid, Fe, and Men. (ie, Feman).

Tir na nóg (Atlantis/Karya) was an island off the west coast of Ireland in the Atlantic Ocean and is where the Tuatha de Danann (the Sidhe / Sida) resided.

The ancient Athenians called the island Tír na nóg, Atlantis (Karya).

It also was home to a few mortals who were carried there by the Sidhe/Side/Sida such as the Celtic hero Oisín who loved the ban-sidhe/Banshee (fairy woman) Niamh.



Tír na nÓg ("Land of the Young") or Tír na hÓige ("Land of Youth") is one of the names for the Celtic Otherworld. 

Other Old Irish names for the Otherworld include: Tír na nÓg ("land of the young/land of youth"), Tír nAill ("the other land"), Tír Tairngire ("Land of Promise/Promised Land"), Tír fo Thuinn ("Land under the Wave"), Mag Mell ("Plain of Delight/Delightful Plain"), Ildathach ("Multicoloured place"), and Emain Ablach (the Isle of Apple Trees), Tír na mBeo ("land of the living"), Mag Mell ("plain of delight"), Mag Findargat ("the white-silver plain"), Mag Argatnél ("the silver-cloud plain"), Mag Cíuin ("the gentle plain"). 

The Otherworld is the realm of the deities (Kop Sida/Aravani/the Tuatha Dé Danann).

The Otherworld is often reached by entering ancient burial mounds (Kops), such as those at Brú na Bóinne and Cnoc Meadha. 

These were known as sídhe ("Otherworld dwellings") and were the dwellings of the gods, later called the aos sí or daoine sí ("Otherworld folk").

The Otherworld can also be reached by entering caves, or by going underwater or across the western sea.

The Otherworld exists alongside this world and is located beyond the edge of the earth and intrudes into this world; signaled by the appearance of divine beings (Kop Sida).

One may be invited into the Otherworld by offering an apple or a silver apple branch, or a ball of thread to follow as it unwinds.

The Otherworld is usually called Annwn in Welsh and Avalon in Arthurian legend. 

The Otherworld is also known in Ireland as Tech Duinn, where the souls (Sidas) of the dead gather. 

When the Celts settled in Ellada (ancient Greece) and constructed the ancient Hellenic language the Otherworld was known Elysium.

The ancient Hellenic and Celtic religions have a shared origin in ancient Proto-Indo-European religion which goes back before the time of the Great Flood. 

Admission into Elysium or the Elysian Fields (Ancient Greek: Ἠλύσιον πεδίον, Ēlýsion pedíon) or Tír na nÓg is reserved for those who related to the gods. 

It includes those chosen by the gods, the righteous, and the heroic, where they will remain after death, to live a blessed and happy life.

Homer located The Elysian Fields on the western edge of the Earth by the stream of Okeanos (Ler/Poseidon).

In the time of the Greek/Hellenic oral poet Hesiod, Elysium would also be known as the Fortunate Isles or the Isles (or Islands) of the Blessed, located in the western ocean at the end of the earth.

Homer in the Odyssey describes fair-haired Rhadamanthus dwelling on Elysium/Tír na nÓg/Atlantis.

Rhadamanthus was a wise king of Crete and In later accounts, he is said to be one of the judges of the dead. 

Rhadamanthus' name might mean 'rod diviner' derived from two Greek words mantis "soothsayer, seer" and rhabdos "rod, wand" (Kop Sida/Ara Vani). 

It could also be etymologically related to Greek adámas "invincible, untamed" or Greek damázo "to overpower, to tame, to conquer." 

Festivals of Samhain and Beltane are liminal times when contact with the Otherworld was more likely.

In Irish Immrama (Imm-rama) ("voyage") tales, a beautiful young Otherworld woman often approaches the hero and sings to him of this happy land. 

Sometimes she offers him an apple, or the promise of her love in exchange for his help in battle. 

He follows her, and they journey over the sea together and are seen no more.

They journey in a boat of glass, in a chariot, or on horseback (usually upon a white horse, as in the case of the goddess Niamh of the Golden Hair). 

Sometimes the hero returns after what he believes is a short time, only to find that all his companions are dead and he has actually been away for hundreds of years. 

Sometimes the hero sets out on a quest, and a magic mist descends upon him. 

He may find himself before an unusual palace and enter to find a warrior or a beautiful woman who makes him welcome. 

The woman may be the goddess Fand, the warrior may be Manannán mac Lir or Lugh, and after strange adventures, the hero may return successfully. 

However, even when the mortal manages to return to his own time and place, he is forever changed by his contact with the Otherworld.

In Irish folklore there is another otherworldly realm called Tech Duinn (the "House of Donn" or "House of the Dark One").

Souls of the dead traveled to Tech Duinn before being reincarnated.

Donn is (Posei don) a god of the dead and ancestor of the Gaels. 

Tech Duinn is commonly identified with Bull Rock, an islet off the west coast of Ireland which resembles a portal tomb.

In Ireland, there was a belief that the souls of the dead departed westwards over the sea with the setting sun.

West-ward also being the location of Tír na nÓg/Atlantis.

Celtic belief in islands consecrated to gods and heroes are Anglesey (Môn), off the north coast of Wales, which was the sacred island of the druids of Britain; the Scilly islands, where archaeological remains of proto-historical temples have been found; and some of the Hebrides (Iona and Ethica).

Tír na nÓg is a paradise and supernatural realm of everlasting youth, beauty, health, abundance, and joy.

They enjoy a life of eating, dancing and loving and they never have to deal with death or dying.

Its inhabitants are the Tuatha Dé Danann (Kop Sida/Aravani).

The god (Kop Sida) that rules this region is said to be the first ancestor of the human race (Kop Sidas) and the god of the dead.

Pigs are symbols of the Tuath Dé Danann (Kop Sidas/Aravani)

Princesses are given a pig's head and pigs are a common symbol in Irish/Hellenic folklore.

Early in Celtic culture, the pig was used as a funeral animal and pigs were an important aspect of trade between the Celts and Romans. 

They also represent a connection to the warrior class and are said to be good luck to the person who catches them






Danann is generally believed to be the genitive of a female name.


It has been reconstructed as Danu, of which Anu (genitive Anann or Anunnaki) is an alternative form.


Danu is the mother goddess of the Tuatha Dé Danann (Old Irish: "The peoples of the goddess Danu."


Danu is an ancient triple goddess who is considered the "Great Mother."


The Tuatha Dé Danann (Kopsidas / Aravani) is the race from Tir to nóg (Atlantis).


In the earliest writings, the race is referred to as the Tuath Dé (plural Tuatha De or the "People of God," ie, the Kopsidas / Aravani.


The Old Irish word tuath (plural tuatha) means "people, tribe, nation"; is the genitive case of the work and, depending on the context, can mean "god, gods, goddess" or more broadly "supernatural being, object of worship".


The Tuath De Danann usually translated as "people (s) / tribe (s) of the goddess Danu, also known by the earlier name Tuath De (" tribe of the gods "), are a supernatural race.

The etymology of the word Danu come from Dan + u and Da + no.


  • The etymology of the word dan used to form the word Dan + u.
  • Etymology 1st dan, Anagram, dna, Noun dna (countable and uncountable, plural dnas)
  1. Alternative form of DNA.
  • The etymology of DNA, English, Noun, (numbered and uncountable, plural DNAs)

  1. (biochemistry) A biopolymer of deoxyribonucleic acid, which has four different chemical groups, called bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine.
  2. (informal) That part of a person's character that has a genetic origin.
  3. (figuratively) The fundamental values ​​or vision of an organization.
  • DNA. Deoxyribonucleic acid is a molecule composed of two chains (nucleotides) that coil around each other to form a double helix carrying the genetic instructions used in the growth, development, function and reproduction of all known living organisms and many viruses. DNA and ribonucleic acid (RNA) have nucleic acids; along with proteins, lipids and complex carbohydrates (polysaccharides), nucleic acids are one of the four major types of macromolecules that are essential for all known forms of life.
  • Etymology 2nd dan, Bambara, Verb dan

  1. to count.
  2. to sow.

  • The etymology of the word count, English, From Middle English counten, borrowed from the Anglo-Norman conter, from the Latin French conter, from the Latin compute, present active infinitive of computō ("I compute" ). Displaced native Middle English tellen ("to count") (from Old English tellan) and Middle English rimen (from Old English rīman). Doublet of compute.
  • Etymology 2. count, Verb count (third-person singular simple present counts, current participle counting, simple past and past participle counted)

  1. (intransitive) To recite numbers in sequence.

  • Etymology 3. count, English, Noun, count (plural counts)

  1. The male ruler of a county.
  2. A nobleman holding a rank intermediate between dukes and barons.
  • Synonyms

  1. (English counts): Earl
  2. (French counts): comte
  3. (Italian counts): conte
  4. (German counts): graph.

  • Derived terms

  1. viscount
  2. count palatine, count palatinate.

  • Related terms

  1. (female form or wife): countess, contessa
  2. (adjective form): commital
  3. (related titles): baron, don, duke, earl, lord, prince.

  • The etymology of the word count palatine, English, From Latin comes palatinus.
  • The etymology of the word palatinus, Latin, From Palātīnus ("of or belonging to the Palatium, Palatine"), whose meaning shifted in parallel with Palātium ("one of the seven hills of Rome, on which the first buildings were constructed") shifting to palatium ("palace").
  • Adjective palātīnus (feminine palātīna, neuter palātīnum); first / second declension

  1. palace, related to the palace
  2. palatine, relating to the palatine counties
  3. palatine, relating to the palate.

  • The etymology of the word sow, English, From Middle English sowe, from Old English sugu, from Proto-Germanic * sugō (compare West Frisian, Dutch zeug, Low German Söög, Norwegian sugge, -Indo-European * suh2kéh2 (compare Welsh hwch ("pig"), Sanskrit सूकर (sūkará, "swine, boar")), from * suH- 'pig' ὗς (hûs), Albanian thi, Avestan (hū, "boar") See also swine.
  • hū / hu / Hu. Hu (ḥw), in ancient Egypt, was the deification of the first word, the word of creation, that Atum was said to have exclaimed upon ejaculating or, alternatively, his circumcision, in his masturbatory act of creating the Ennead.
  • Hu and Renenutet
  • Hu is already mentioned in the Old Kingdom Pyramid texts (PT 251, PT 697) as a companion of the deceased pharaoh. Together with Sia, he was depicted in the retinue of Thoth, with whom he was also occasionally identified.
  • In the Middle Kingdom, all gods participated in Hu and Sia, and were associated with Ptah who created the universe by uttering the word of creation. Hu was depicted in human form, as a falcon, or as a man with a ram's head.
  • In the New Kingdom, both Hu and Sia together with Heke, Irer and Sedjem were members of the fourteen creative powers of Amun-Ra. By the time of Ptolemaic Egypt, Hu had merged with Shu (air).
  • The etymology of the word Sow, English, Noun sow (plural sows or swine)

  1. A female pig.

  • See also

  1. boar
  2. hog
  3. pig.

  • Etymology 2. sow, From Middle English sowen, from Old English sāwan, from Proto-Germanic * sēaną, from Proto-Indo-European * seh1-. Compare Dutch zaaien, German säen, Danish så. Verb

  • sow (third-person singular simple present sows, present-day sowing, simple past sowed, past participle sown)

  1. (transitive) To scatter, disperse, or plant (seeds).
  2. (figuratively) To spread abroad; it propagate.
  3. (figuratively) To scatter over; to besprinkle.
  • Synonyms

  1. plant, scatter

  • Etymology 3. Middle English, Noun, sow

  1. Alternative form of sowing.

  • The etymology of the word sowe, Middle English, Noun, sowe (plural sowes or sowe).

  1. A female pig (protruding long tooth).
  • Etymology 3. Biem, Noun, dan

  1. water.

  • Etymology 4. dan, Cornish, Noun, dan

  1. Soft mutation of tan.

  • The etymology of the word tan, Cornish, From Proto-Celtic * teɸnets ("fire") (compare Old Irish teine, Welsh tân). Noun, tan m tanow

  1. threads.

  • Etymology 2nd tan, French, Probably from Gaulish * tanno- ("oak"), from Latin tannum ("oak bark").
  • Etymology 3rd tan, Haitian Creole, From French temps ("time, weather").
  • Noun tan

  1. time
  2. weather.

  • Etymology 4. tan, Hungarian, Noun, tanok tanok

  1. doctrines
  2. science of, theory, branch of instruction
  3. (in compound words) -logy, -graphy (a study of a particular subject).
  • Etymology 5. Tan, Old English, From Proto-Germanic * tainaz. Noun tān m (nominative plural tānas)

  1. twig, branch.

  • Etymology 6. tan, Old Swedish, From Old Norse tènn, from Proto-Germanic * tanţs. Noun tan f

  1. tooth.

  • Etymology 7th, Turkish, From Old Turkic taŋ ("sky, sunrise, daylight").
  • Noun, tan (definite accusative tanı, plural tanlar)

  1. dawn, twilight, sunrise, daylight.
  • Etymology 8. Tan, Vietnamese, Verb tan (散, 珊, 潵, 㪚)

  1. it melt
  2. to dissolve, dissipate.

  • Etymology 9. tan from Wolof, Noun, tan (defined form tan mi)

  1. vulture.
  • Etymology 10. Tan, Translingual, Symbol, Tan

  1. (trigonometry) A symbol of the trigonometric function tangent.
  • Etymology 11. tan, Synonyms tg.
  • The etymology of tg / TG, Translingual, Symbol TG

  1. The ISO 3166-1 two-letter (alpha-2) code for Togo

  • Noun, TG

  1. thyroglobulin.
  • Etymology 2. TG, English, Noun TG (plural TGs)

  1. temporary gentleman
  2. transformational grammar
  3. transgender person.
  • Adjective TG

  1. transgender.
  • Interjection TG

  1. thank God.
  • Etymology 3. tg, Borrowed from French tan ("tanbark"), from Gaulish tanno ("green oak") - compare Breton tann ("red oak" oak "), from Proto-Indo-European * dong (" fir "). Related to Hittite [tango], Latin femur, genitive feminis ("thigh"), German Tann ("woods"), Tanne, "Albanian thanë" Ancient Greek shrub (thámnos, "thicket"), Avestan (tanuuarə), Sanskrit धनु (dhánu).
  • Noun tan (plural tans)

  1. A yellowish-brown color.
  2. A darkening of the skin resulting from exposure to sunlight or similar light sources.
  3. The bark of an oak or other tree from which tannic acid is obtained.
  • Etymology 11. tan, From Old English tān ("twig, switch"), from Proto-Germanic * tainaz ("rod, twig, straw, lot"). Noun, tan (plural tans)

  1. (dialectal) A twig or small switch.

  • Related terms.
  1. mistletoe.
  • The etymology of the word mistletoe, English, From Middle English mistel-tō, mistelto ("European mistletoe; hardened berries of mistletoe used as beads"), from Old English misteltān, mistiltān, mistil-tān ("Mistletoe; basil; birdlime") + tān ("sprig, twig"), [1] equivalent to mistle + tan ("twig"). Mistel is derived from Proto-Germanic * mihstilaz ("mistletoe; basil"), from Proto-Indo-European * h3meyʰʰ ("to urinate"). The English word is cognate with Danish mistelten, Icelandic mistilteinn.
  • Noun mistletoe (countable and uncountable, plural mistletoes).

  1. (countable, uncountable) Any of several hemiparasitic evergreen plants of the order Santalales with white berries that grow in the crowns of apple trees, oaks and other trees, such as the European mistletoe (Viscum album) and American mistletoe or eastern mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum).
  2. uncountable) A sprig of one such plant used as a Christmas decoration, associated with the custom that a man may kiss any woman standing below it.

  • Mistletoe played an important role in Druidic mythology in the Ritual of Oak and Mistletoe.
  • The ritual of oak and mistletoe is a Celtic religious ceremony.
  • Etymology 12. tan, Chuukese, Noun, tan

  1. dream.
  • Etymology 5. Dan, Czec, From Latin Dania ("Denmark"). Noun dan m inan.

  1. (geology) Danian, stage of Paleogene
  • The etymology of the word Dānī ("Danes") + -ia. Proper noun Dānia f (genitive Dāniae); first declension.

  1. (Medieval Latin) Denmark.
  • Etymology 6. Dan, Dongxiang, Compare Bonan Dam, ultimately from Proto-Turkic * dām. Compare Turkish dam ("roof"), Uyghur تام (there, "wall"), Salar there, tām ("wall"). Noun, dan.

  1. wall.
  • Etymology 7. dan, From French dent ("tooth") Noun dan

  1. tooth.
  • Etymology 8. Dan, Malay, Alternative forms, دان
  • Etymology 9. dan, Middle English, Noun, dan

  1. don.
  • The etymology of the word don, From Latin dominus ("lord, head of household"), like the Spanish don and Italian don; from domus ("house"). Compare domination. Noun don (plural dons)

  1. A university professor, especially one at Oxford or Cambridge.

  • Etymology 2nd don, Bambara, Noun, don

  1. day.
  • Etymology 3rd don, Czech, Borrowed from Spanish don, which is from Latin dominus ("lord").
  • Related terms, don.
  • The etymology of the word dona, Czech, Borrowed from Italian donna. Noun dona f

  1. Italian noble woman, lady, originally a noble title.
  • The etymology of the word donna, English, From Italian donna. Noun, donna plural donnas

  1. A lady, especially a noblewoman; the title given to a lady in Italy.
  • Etymology 2nd Donna, From Late Latin, a shortened version of Latin domina ("lady, mistress of an estate or household"), from domus ("master"), from domus ("home").
  • Related terms, madonna.
  • The etymology of the word madonna, Finnish Noun, madonna

  1. Madonna (picture of Virgin Mary).
  • Etymology 2. Madonna, English, From Italian madonna, from Old Italian ma ("we") + donna ("lady"). The given name is derived from the English term, not used as a given name in Italy. Proper noun Madonna

  1. The Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus.
  • See also: Madonna lily.
  • The etymology of the word Madonna lily, English, Noun, Madonna lily (plural Madonna lilies).

  1. Lilium candidum, a true lily native to Greece, the Western Balkans and the Middle East. Unlike other lilies, it has a basal rosette of leaves through the winter, which die back in summer.
  • The etymology of the word lily, English, from Old English lilie, from Latin līlia, plural of līlium, from Ancient Greek lyrion, from Fayyumic Coptic ϩ ⲗⲏⲣⲓ (hlēri), variant of ϩ ⲣⲏⲣⲉ (hrēre), from Demotic Demotic ḥrrj. png (ṛrrj, "flower"), from Egyptian ṛrrt ("flower"), which is perhaps the root of the Sanskrit हली (halī), हलिनी (halinī, "lily"). Noun, lily (plural lilies).

  1. Any of several flowers in the genus Lilium of the family Liliaceae, which includes a great many ornamental species.
  2. Any of several species of herbaceous flowers which may or may not resemble the Lilium genus in any way, and which are not closely related to it or each other.

    3. (heraldry) The flower used as a heraldic charge; also commonly used to describe the fleur-de-lis.
    4. The end of a compass needle that should point north, traditionally often ornamented with the figure of a lily or fleur-de-lis. quotations
    5. A royal spade in the auction bridge.
    6. (cartomancy) The thirtieth Lenormand card, representing calmness and maturity.

  • The etymology of the word Sida, English-noun (plural sidas), from the genus name meaning water lily or pomegranate. The word "sida" derives from the writings of Theophrastus, who was a pupil of Aristotle. Aristotle left his original manuscripts and library to Theophrastus. Aristotle was a pupil of Plato.
  • Etymology 2nd madonna, Chess pieces, queen, donna.
  • The etymology of the word regina, Italian, From Latin rēgīna; compare Spanish reina. Noun, queen f (plural regine, masculine re)

  1. queen (monarch)
  2. queen (male homosexual)
  3. (chess, card games) queen.
  • Etymology 2nd Queen, From the inflected stem of rēx ("king"). Compare Sanskrit राज्ञी (rājñī, "queen, princess"). Noun, rēgīna f (genitive rēgīnae); first declension.

  1. queen.
  2. princess.
  3. (Later Latin, chess) queen.
  • Etymology 4. don, from a shortening of a previous donno, from dom'no (used by Dante), from Latin domnus <dominus. Noun, don m (inv)

  1. Father (a title given to priests.)
  2. A title of respect for a man.
  • Etymology 5th Domain, Old English, From Proto-Germanic * dōną ("to do"), from Proto-Indo-European * dʰeh1- ("to make, to, place"). Cognate with Old Frisian dúa, dua, dwā (West Frisian dwaan), Old Saxon dòn, doan, duan, duon, Old Dutch duon (Dutch doen), Old High German tuon (German cannon); and, outside the Germanic languages, with Ancient Greek latin (títhēmi), Latin faciō, Old Irish dorat (Irish déan), Old Church Slavonic дѣти (children).
  • Descendants Middle English: don, donne, doyn, do, doon

  1. Scots: yes.
  • The etymology of the word dae, Afrikaans, Noun, dae

  1. plural of dag (dag dae / Dagda).
  • The etymology of the word dag, Afrikaans, From Dutch dag ("day"), cognate with German Tag. Noun, dag (dae,

  1. a day.
  • Etymology 2. dag, Noun, dag (plural dags)

  1. A skewer.
  2. A sip, and a sharpened genus used for roasting food over a fire.
  • Etymology 3rd dag, English, Noun dag (plural dags)

  1. (predominantly Ireland) Eye dialect spelling of dog.
  • The semi-palindrome of the dog is god.
  • The Anagram of dag is gad (gad fly).
  • The etymology of the word gad, English, Taboo deformation of God. Interjection gad.

  1. an exclamatory interjection roughly equivalent to 'by God', 'goodness gracious',' for goodness' sake '
  • Etymology 2nd Gad, Lower Sorbian, From Proto-Slavic * gad ("serpent").
  • Etymology 3rd gad, Navajo, Noun, gad

  1.  juniper, cedar (especially Juniperus deppeana).
  • Etymology 3rd Gad, Polish, From Proto-Slavic * gad, Noun, gad m anim

  1. reptiles.
  • Etymology 4. Scottish Gaelic, Pronoun, gad

  1. you (informal singular, direct object).
  • Etymology 5. gad, Veps, Noun, gad

  1. snake.
  • Etymology 6. gad, Volapük, Noun, gad (plural gads)

  1. garden.
  • Etymology 4. dag, Afrikaans, From Dutch dag ("day"), cognate with German Tag. Noun dag (plural dae, diminutive daggie)

  1. a day.
  • Etymology 5. dag, From Dutch dag, shortening of goedendag ("goed, pleasant") + dag ("day"). Alternative forms dog. semi-palindrome god.
  • Etymology 6. Danish, From Old Danish dagh, from Old Norse dagr, from Proto-Germanic * dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European * dʰegʷʰ- ("to burn"). Noun, dag c (singularly defined dagen, plural indefinite dage)

  1. day.
  • Etymology 7. dag, Dutch, From Middle Dutch dach, from Old Dutch dag, from Proto-Germanic * dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European * dʰegʷʰ- ("to burn, to be illuminated"). Cognate with German Tag, West Frisian dei, English day, Danish dag. Noun, dag m (plural dagen, diminutive dagje n or daagje n)

  1. day (period of 24 hours)
  2. daytime (sunrise and sunset).
  • Etymology 8. dag, Turkmen, From Old Turkic tag, from Proto-Turkic * tāg, * dāg ("mountain"). Noun, dag (defined accusative dagy, plural daglar)

  1. mountain (Kop).
  • Etymology 10. dan, Synonyms, ŷn (South Wales).
  • In Greek, ie, earth means earth.


The etymology of the word used to form the word Danu, Dan + u.


  • Etymology 1. u, English, Abbreviation u
  1. Underwater.
  • Etymology 2. u, Afrikaans, Pronoun u

  1. (formal) you (singular, subject and object).
  • Etymology 3. u, Aromanian, Probably from an early (proto-Romanian) root * eaua, from Latin illam, female accusative singular of ille. Compare Romanian o.
  • The etymology of the word ille, Latin, From Old Latin olle ("he, that") (also ollus, olla), from Proto-Indo-European * h2ol-no- or * h₂l̥-no-, from * h2el- "Beyond, other"). Cognate with Latin uls ("other"), alter ("the other"), Umbrian ulu ("that place"), Old Church Slavonic Lani (lani, "last year" that (year) "). Determiner ille m (feminine illa, neuter illud)

  1. "That" (referring to a person or thing away from both speaker and listener); he, she.
  2. "That (renowned person)" (used to cast the referent in a positive light).
  • The etymology of the word illa, Catalan, Noun, illa f (plural illes).

  1. island.
  • Etymology 2. illa, Interlingua, Pronoun illa.

  1.  she.
  • Etymology 3. illa, Quechua, Noun illa.

  1. lightning, ray, reflected or artificial light
  2. gem, jewel, hidden treasure
  3. a sacred tree or rock struck by lightning
  4. and unit of measurement.
  • Etymology 4. u, Catalan, Noun, um (plural uns).
  1. (cardinal) one.
  • Etymology 5. Dutch, u, Originally the accusative / dative form of jij / gij, from Middle Dutch u, from Old Dutch iu, from Proto-Germanic * iwwiz, West German variation of * izwiz, dative / accusative of * jūz, from Proto-Indo-European * yu. Doublet of jou.
  • The etymology of the word jou.
  • The etymology of the word jew, Phrase jew.

  1.  Pronunciation spelling of d 'you, representing colloquial English.
  • The etymology of the word you, Alternative forms.

  1. ye (plural form, archaic or dialectal)
  2. ya, yah, yer, yeh, y ', yo, yu, yuh (informal or eye dialect)
  3. -ch (informal, after / t /)
  4. -ja (informal, after / d /)
  5. u (informal, internet)
  6. yoo (eye dialect)
  7. yew (became obsolete as English spelling became more standardized, then was 'recoined' as a nonstandard variant for (mainly humorous) use in informal situations and on the internet.
  8. youe, yow, yowe (obsolete).
  • Etymology, 2, you, From Middle English you, yow, ȝow, (the case case of ye), from Old English, from * iwwiz ("you"; * jūz), Western form of Proto-Germanic * izwiz ("you"; the case of * jūz), from Proto-Indo-European * yūs ("you (plural)") Cognate with Saterland Frisian jou ("you"), West Frisian jo ("you"), Low German jo, joe and oe ("you" "You", order pron.), Latin vōs ("you"), Avestan (vō, "you"). See usage notes. Ye, you and your are cognate with Dutch jij / je, jou, jouw; Low German her, y / y, yug and german ihr, euch and euer respectively. You are also cognate with archaic Swedish I.
  • The etymology of the word Yah.
  • Yahweh, the shortened form of Yahweh, the Hebrew name for God.
  • Yah, Yah (Egyptian: jˁḥ, Coptic ⲟⲟ ϩ) is a lunar deity in ancient Egyptian religion. The word jˁḥ simply means "moon". It is also transliterated as Yah, Jah, Jah (w), Joh or Aah.
  • Etymology 1st jou, Catalan, From Old Occitan, from Latin-jugum, iugum, from Proto-Italic * jugom, from Proto-Indo-European * Yug. Noun jou m (plural jous).

  1. yoke.
  • Related terms
  1. conjugar
  2. jova
  • The etymology of the word jova, Serbo-Croatian, Noun jova f (Cyrillic spelling јова)

  1. alder.
  • The etymology of the word alder, from Middle English alder, from Algerian, alder, from alpine, (Alanza (n)), Latin alnus, Latvian alksnis, Polish olcha, Albanian halo ("black pine"), Ancient Macedonian (Hesychius) ali (álicha, "white poplar"), Noun alder (plural alders).

  1. Any of several trees (shrubs) of the genus Alnus, belonging to the birch family.
  • Etymology 2nd alder, Old Swedish, From Old Norse all, from Proto-Germanic * allaz. Adjective alder.
  1. all
  2. whole, complete.
  • Etymology 3. From Old Norse aldr, from Proto-Germanic * aldrą. Noun alder m

  1. lifetime
  2. age; how old one or something is
  3. age, era
  4. old age.
  • Etymology 2nd jou, Haitian Creole, From French jour ("day") Noun jou

  1. day.
  • Etymology 3rd jou, Old French, Alternative forms

  1. yeah
  2. jeo
  3. is
  4. ge.
  • From Vulgar Latin * eo, from Latin ego, from Proto-Indo-European * éH2. Pronounced by jou

  1. I.
  • The etymology of the word I, Homophones: eye, aye, ay, From Middle English I, ik (also ich), from Old English, Ic, iċċ ("I" "I"), from Proto-Indo-European * éH2 ("I"). Cognate with Scots I, I, I (I), Saterland Frisian iek ("I"), West Frisian I ("I" (I), Bavarian i ("I"), Danish and Norwegian Bokmål jeg ("I"), Norwegian Nynorsk eg ("I"), Swedish jag "), Latin ego (" I "), Ancient Greek egos (egṓ," I "), Russian ja (ja," I "), Lithuanian as (" I "). See also their English.
  • The etymology of the word is, Haitian Creole, Noun, is

  1. eye.
  • Etymology 2nd, German, Old High German io. Homophone: jäh.
  • The etymology of the word io, Io was a priestess of the Goddess Hera in Argos. In order to exact her revenge, Hera sent a gadfly to sting Io continuously, driving her to wander the world without rest. Io (Demeter / Brigid / Danu) escaped across the Ionian Sea to Egypt. The Io-nian Sea was named after Io who was known as Isis in Egypt.
  • Etymology 3rd is, Icelandic, Shortening of Jesús ("Jesus").
  • Etymology 4. jou, From Vulgar Latin * eo, from Latin ego, from Proto-Indo-European * éH2.
  • Etymology 6th, Breton, Middle Dutch, From Old Dutch iuwa, from Proto-Germanic * izweraz. Descendants

  1. Dutch: uw
  2. Limburgish: EUR.
  • The etymology of the word Euro, Translingual Symbol EUR

  1. euro.
  • Etymology 2nd eur, Originally an abbreviation for Esposizione Universale Roma, for which the city was built. Proper noun EUR f

  1. A city in the south of Rome.
  • Etymology 3rd eur, Breton, Ultimately from Latin hora. Noun, eur f (plural eurioù).

  1. hour.
  • The etymology of the word hora, English, From Hebrew הוֹרָה (hóra) and Romanian hora, from Turkish hora, probably from Greek dance (chorós, "dance"). Noun Mountain (plural horas).

  1. A circle dance popular in the Balkans and Israel.
  2. Homonym, Horus.

  • The etymology of the word Horus, From Late Latin Hōrus, from Ancient Greek Ὧros (Hôros), from Egyptian ḥr. Proper noun, Horus

  1. (Egyptian mythology) The ancient Egyptian falcon-headed god of the sun, sky, war, and kingdom.
  2. The most commonly encountered family relationship describes Horus as the son of Isis and Osiris, and he plays a key role in the Osiris narrative as Osiris's heir and the rival to Set, the killer of Osiris. In another tradition, Hathor is regarded as his mother and sometimes as his wife.

  • Etymology 2nd Mountain, Borrowed from Sanskrit होरा (horā, "hour"). Noun mountain (uncountable).

  1. A branch of traditional Indian astrology, dealing with the finer points of predictive methods.

  • Etymology 3rd Mountain, Catalan, From Latin hōra ("hour"). Noun mountain f (hores).

  1. hour (sixty minutes)
  2. time (as indicated by a clock).
  3. time (the appropriate hour to do something).
  • The etymology of the word hores, Danish, Noun, hores c

  1. genitive singular indefinite of hore.
  • The etymology of the word up, Danish, From Old Norse hora, from Proto-Germanic * hōrčina, from Proto-Indo-European * kāro-, * keh2ro- ("dear, loved"). Noun hore c (singular defined horen, plural indefinite horer)

  1. whore (sexually promiscuous woman).
  • Etymology 4th Mountain, See Slovene Gora. From Proto-Slavic * gora, from Proto-Indo-European * gwerH-. Noun, mountain f

  1. mountain.
  • The etymology of the word kop, English, Afrikaans, Noun kop kops)

  1. (South Africa) A hill or mountain.
  • Etymology 4. Eur, Old French, Noun, Eur m (oblique plural eurs, nominative singular eur, nominative plural eur)

  1. chance; fortune
  2. omen.
  • Etymology 7th, Middle English, Noun u
  1. Alternative form of ew.
  • The etymology of the word ew, Middle English, Alternative forms u, iw, iv, eev, hw, ewe, From Old English, to, from Proto-Germanic * īhwaz. Noun ew

  1. yew (Taxus baccata)
  2. yew wood /.
  • Etymology 8th, Norman, From Old French ueil, from Vulgar Latin oclus, from Latin oculus, from Proto-Indo-European * h3ekʷ- ("eye; to see"). Noun, um (plural uûs or uur).

  1. (France, anatomy) eye.
  • Etymology 9th, Tzotzil, Noun, u

  1. moon.
  2. month.
  • Etymology 10. u, Vietnamese, Noun, u.

  1. (Northern Vietnam) mother.
  • Etymology 11. u, Vietnamese, From Proto-Vietic * ʔuː ("hump (of a zebu)").
  • The etymology of the word zebu, Noun, zebu (plural zebus)

  1. A domesticated ox native to Asia and Africa, with a large fleshy hump on his back and a dewlap (Bos primigenius indicus).
  • Synonyms: Indian ox.
  • Etymology 12. u, Volapük Conjunction u.

  1. .

  • Alternative forms

  1. (in front of vowels) ud.
  • The etymology of the word ud, Serbo-Croatian, Noun ud m (Cyrillic spelling).

  1. language
  2. member (as in penis).


The etymology of the da used to form the word Da + nu.


  • Etymology 1. Da, from English, Noun, da (plural das) (Ireland, Scotland, Northern England) Father. Synonyms pa, Pa. See also, grandpa, ma. Basque, Noun, pa 1. kiss.
  • The etymology of the word pa, Catalan pa, From Old Provençal pan, from Latin pānis. Mr. Pan is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, the nature of mountain (Kop) wilds and rustic music, and the companion of the nymphs (Sida). The Lord is associated with a goddess of God, Demeter, Rhea and Cybele.
  • The origin of the name "Poseidon" breaks it into an element meaning "husband" or "lord" (posi), from Proto-Indo-European (PIE) * pótis) (da), Doric for (gē), producing something like a lord or a spouse of Da, ie, of the Earth, this links him to Demeter / Cyblele / Danu, "Earth-Mother".
  • Etymology 2nd pa, from Dakota, Noun, pa 1. head, ie, kick.
  • Etymology 2. da, from Basque, Verb, to the third person singular present indicative of isan; He / She is (Is-is). Cebuano, Initial clipping of ada (related words, gonadal, Lef-k-ada, Ell-ada, Kaumodaki g-ada, Dagh-ada).
  • The etymology of the word ada, Noun, ada (defined accusative adanı, plural adalar, island (Tír na nÓg / Atlantis / Ireland / Lefk-ada).
  • Etymology 2nd edition, Balinese, Verb ada 1. to be (exist).
  • Etymology 3rd order, Crimean Gothic, Noun ada 1. egg.
  • Etymology 4th, Hiligaynon Etymology From Spanish Hada. Noun áda, 1. fairy. (ie, the Tuatha Dé Danann, the Aos Sí, the Kop's residence / Kopsi-das).
  • Etymology 3. Da, Ewe, Noun da, 1st bow 2. mother 3. snake. Fala, From Old Portuguese da, from + a. Preposition, da (plural das, masculine do, masculine plural dos). German, yes, (then): also; dann. Manx da, From Old Irish, to. Pronoun, da 1. third-person singular masculine of da, to him / it.
  • The etymology of the word "it" from English, Noun it (plural its). One who is neither a he nor a she.
  • Etymology 2. "it" from Azeri, Noun, it (Cyrillic spelling) 1. dog. The semi-palindrome or half-palindrome of the dog is God (eg, lap / pal, dog / god). Dog also refers to Dog Star, which is the star Sirius in the Canis Major constellation.
  • Etymology 3. "it" from Charrua, Noun it 1st fire.
  • Etymology 4. "it" from Chuukese, Noun it 1. name.
  • Etymology 5. "it" from Crimean Tatar Synonyms köpek.
  • The etymology of the word kopek, from Crimean Tatar Noun, kopek dog. The semi-palindrome or half-palindrome of the dog is God (eg, lap / pal, dog / god / köp-ek God). Dog also refers to Dog Star, which is the star Sirius in the Canis Major constellation.
  1. The etymology of the word kick. English-Nouns from Dutch, literally meaning 'head,' crown, top, pillar, and hill, mountain, mound. Danish, cup, ie, pour the wine into the cup. Kops (copse) = a small group of trees especially live Oak (Dagda / Daghda / Dag-ida) or Elm (Elm / Elatha / Elada), grove, mott, forest, orchard , tree, wood, coppice, bush, brush. (Grove-Druidism, Wicca) A place of worship.
  2. The etymology of the word ek used to form the word kop + ek, Icelandic, From Old Norse ek, from Proto-Norse (ek), from Proto-Germanic * ek, from Proto-Indo-European * éH2. Alternative forms ég (modern), eg (archaic, poetic). Ido, Borrowing from Latin ex, with the x changed to just so that it does not interfere with ex- (x), which shares the same origin. Preposition ek, out of. Marshallese, Noun, ek 1. fish. Middle English, Conjunction Ek 1 also. related terms eake.
  3. The etymology of the word eake, from Nauruan, Noun, eake, 1st war 2. battle, 3. feud 4. fight 5. dispute.
  4. Etymology 2. Ek, Old Norse, From Proto-Norse (ek), from Proto-Germanic * ek (whence also Old English, Old Saxon, Old High German, Gothic, ), from Proto-Indo-European * éH2. Among the earliest attestations of the pronoun, as ek, is the proto-Norse inscription on the 2nd-4th century Lindholm amulet, which also contains a postpositive, perhaps clitic, form of the word, in hateka, "I am called" Old Norse heiti ek ("I hight, I am called") and the form of terms like kank, kannk ("I can") (kann + ek). The inscription on the shaft of the Kragehul I spear.
  5. Etymology 3. Ek, Old Saxon, From Proto-Germanic * aiks, from Proto-Indo-European * h₂eyE- ("Oak"). Noun ēk 1st oak. Swedish, From Old Norse eik, from Proto-Germanic * aiks, from Proto-Indo-European * h2ey- ("Oak"). Noun, ek c 1. oak. Tocharian B, From Proto-Tocharian * ëk, from Late Proto-Indo-European * ok? Ss, from * h3okʷ-, * h3ekʷ- ("eye; to see"). Compare Tocharian A ak. Noun, ek 1st eye.
  • The etymology of the word "it", from Irish, Alternative forms id.
  • The etymology of the id, from English, noun id (plural ids) Anagram Sid.
  • Etymology 2. id, Synonyms of lizard brain.
  • Etymology 3. id, from English, noun id (plural ids) Alternative spelling of ide.
  • Etymology 4. id Latin, From the pronominal Proto-Indo-European * i-; see also Old Church Slavonic onus (he, "he"), Lithuanian ans ("he").
  • The etymology of the ide, English, From French ide, from Scientific Latin idus (species name), from Swedish id. Noun, ide (plural ides). 1. A freshwater fish of the family Cyprinidae found throughout northern Europe and Asia, Leuciscus idus (Leucas Idas). See also ides. Ides, English. Noun ides (plural ides) 1. In the Roman calendar, the fifteenth day of March, May, July, October, and the thirteenth day of the other months. Eight days after the nones. Anagrams -side. Side are The Loche (Tuatha Dé Danann): abodes of the aes, Kop-sida. Ide, Old English, From Proto-Germanic * dīsiz ("goddess"), from Proto-Indo-European * dʰēs- ("sacred one, saint, hallow, god, deity"). Cognate with Old Saxon idis, Old High German is (Is-is), Old Norse d. Ides Noun ides f (poetic) virgin, lady, woman (especially when noble or magical), queen. Ides, Portuguese, Verb, ides, Second-person plural (vós) present indicative of ir.
  • The etymology of the "ir". From Galician ir, From Latin to. English ir, From Middle English ire, yre, shortened form of iren ("iron"). Norwegian Bokmål Noun irem (defined singular iren, indefinite plural irer, defined irene) 1. person from Ireland, Irishman. Old French Noun ire f (oblique plural ires, nominative singular ire, nominative plural ires) 1. ire, anger, rage.
  • Etymology 2. ir from Kaera, Noun ir water. Latin, Noun ir n (no genitive); irregular declension 1. (rare, anatomy) hand.
  • ir (he, she, it) is; 3rd person singular present indicative form of būt.
  • Etymology 4. From Proto-Baltic *, from the reduced degree * of Proto-Indo-European * ar ("so, then; question particle"). The original meaning "and" (cf. Lithuanian cognate) is found in the 16th and 17th century texts, but since the 18th century on it was no longer used in this sense. Cognates include Lithuanian ir ("and"), Old Prussian ir ("also"), er ("(along) with"), Ancient Greek āra, ár, ), "So, then, then"). Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonyms arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it.
  • The etymology of the word ka, From Egyptian k3. Noun ka (plural kas), A spiritual part of the soul in Egyptian mythology, which survived after death.
  • The etymology of the word ta, is from Ama, Noun, Fire.
  • Etymology 2. ta is from Estonian, Pronoun, he / she.
  • Etymology 3rd, Ewe, Noun, chapter, head. Verb 1. to castrate.
  • The etymology of the word chapter is a noun, the chapter (plural chapters) the governing body of a religious community, especially a cathedral or a knightly order. Synonyms: governing body, council, assembly, convocation, synod, consistorium "the cathedral chapter.
  • The etymology of the word is from Haitian Creole, From French idée ("idea"). Hungarian, Adverb ide (comparative idébb, superlative legidébb) 1. here 2. hither, this way. Ide, Macuna, Noun is 1. water. Malay, Noun id 1. feast day. Maltese, Noun id f (plural idejn) (anatomy) hand. Swedish Noun id c ide; and fish, Leuciscus idus (Leucas-idas). North Frisian, Article, See also di, jü, dåt. Ojibwe, Particle, Related terms, daga. Scottish Gaelic, Prepositional Pronunciation, yes, Alternative form of dha.
  • The etymology of the word daga, Hiligaynon, From Spanish daga, Noun, dag, 1. clay, clay soil 2. sacrifice, specifically human sacrifice.
  • The etymology of the word dha, Scottish Gaelic, dha, to it.
  • Etymology 4th, Spanish, Verb da, Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) Present indicative form of gift.
  • Etymology 5. da, Vanimo, Noun, da 1. pig. Welsh da From Proto-Celtic * dagos ("good") (compare Irish dea-). Adjective, yes (female singular yes, plural yes, equative cystal, comparative gwell, superlative gorau) 1. good, well. Noun, yes, 1. goodness 2. (collective noun) goods, cattle. Zhuang, Noun, da 1. eye.
  • The etymology of the word él, ella,
  • Etymology 2. el, Cornish, Noun, el m (plural eledh) 1st angel. Dalmatian, from Latin ille, illud. Galician, From Latin ille ("that"). Compare Portuguese, Spanish él. Pronoun, el nominative and oblique (dative lle, accusative) 1. he. Related terms ela, elas, eles. Occitan, From Old Provençal [Term?], From Latin ille. Pronoun, Venetian, Pronoun, el.
  • The etymology is Old French, From Latin illa.
  • The Etymology of the word Leu is Tetum, Noun, Bee (Queen Bee / Aphrodite / Isis / Brigid). Galician, Verb, Third-person singular (he, ela) indicative of ler. Ler (meaning "Sea" in Old Irish; Lir is the genitive form) is a sea god in Ireland.
  • The etymology of the word illa is from Catalan, Noun, Island (Ireland, Ithaka / Leukata / Lefkada).
  • Etymology 2. illa, Quechua, illa, Noun 1. lightning, ray 2. gem, jew-el, hidden treasure 3. a sacred tree (or cops) or rock struck by lightning.
  • Etymology 2. ele, Volapük Article ele, dative singular of el (ie, Elatha). Examples, Cyb-ele, S-ele-ne. Irish, atha, Noun, atha f (genitive singular atha) 1. space of time. Irish mutation, with h-prothesis, hatha (Hathor). el 1. he (third-person singular subject pronoun) 2. it (it is used as an obligatory pronoun after a verb. Turkish, Noun, el (defined accusative eli, plural eller) 1. country, homeland, province.
  • The etymology of the word ella is Asturian, From Latin illa, feminine of ille. Pronoun, ella, 1. she. Catalan el, From Old Provençal elha, from Latin illa, feminine of ille. Faroese, From Old Norse ella. Conjunction, ella 1. or. Icelandic From Old Norse ella. Conjunction ella 1. or else. Spanish From Latin illa, feminine of ille. Pronoun, ella ellas 1. she, her (used subjectively and after prepositions) 2. she (used subjectively and after prepositions to refer to feminine nouns). Related terms 1. el.
  • The etymology of the word lle is Galician, Pronoun, lle dative (nominative el, oblique el, accusative o) Related terms el, eles, ela, elas.
  • Etymology 2. Leo, Tetum, Noun, Bee (Queen Bee / Aphrodite / Isis / Brigid). Galician, Verb, Third-person singular (he, ela) indicative of ler. Ler (meaning "Sea" in Old Irish; Lir is the genitive form) is a sea god in Ireland.
  • Etymology 3. Ele, Volapük Article ele, dative singular of el (ie Elatha / Elada).
  • Etymology 4th, Old French, From Latin illa.
  • Etymology 3. illa, Catalan, Noun, island (Ireland / Ethica / Ithaka / Leukata / Lefkada).
  • Etymology 4. illa, Quechua, illa, Noun 1. lightning, ray, gem, jew-el, hidden treasure 3. a sacred tree (rock / kick) or rock struck by lightning.



The etymology of the word is not used to form the word Da + nu,


  • Etymology 1. N, N, N, N, N, N, N, N, N, N, N (n). 2. A measure of constriction in lenses or prisms. Albanian, From Proto-Albanian * nu, from Proto-Indo-European * nu ("now"). Related to ni. Compare Old Greek noun (nûn), Old High German no ("now") Adverb no 1. in Related terms ni. Breton, From Proto-Celtic * snīs (compare Old Irish dreams). Reconstruction: Proto-Celtic / snīs, From Proto-Indo-European * wéy. Pronoun * snīs 1. we. Descendants Old Irish: sinni, Irish: sinn. Icelandic, Pronoun, sinn m (feminine sine, neuter sitt), his, her, their.
  • Nun is the oldest Egyptian god and father of Re / Ra, the sun god.
  • Nun's name means "primal waters," and he represented the waters of chaos out of which Ra-Atum began creation. 
  • The etymology of the word sín, Irish is from Middle-Irish sínid, from Proto-Celtic * sīni-, from the same root as * sīros (long) European * seh1- ("late, long") (compare Sanskrit साय (sāyá, "evening"), Latin sērus ("late"), gothic (seiţă, "evening"). , dialectal) singular of the sultan.
  • The etymology of the word Sion, from English, Proper noun, Sion 1. An alternative spelling is of Zion. Quotations, 1611, Bible, Hebrews 12:22 But ye are come unto Mount Zion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and unto a numbered company of angels. 
  • Etymology 2. The proper noun is Sion, capital of Valais, and canton in Switzerland. English, Proper noun, Sion 1. A mountain (kick) in Israel on which Jerusalem is built. 2. Jerusalem. 3. (metaphorical): The whole nation of Israel. 4. A male given name of modern usage.
  • Etymology 2. Sin, Sin or Nanna (Sumerian: DŠEŠ.KI, DNANNA) was the god of the moon in the Mesopotamian mythology of Akkad, Assyria, and Babylonia. The Symbol is the Bull, Crescent.
  • Etymology 2nd Nu, Biloxi, Noun, ni 1. The Synonym of ani ("water"). Danish From Old Norse, from Proto-Germanic * newun, from Proto-Indo-European * hĺnéwn̥ ("nine"). Numeral ni 1. (cardinal) nine. Kansa, Noun, ni, 1. water 2. any liquid 3. river. Marshallese, Noun ni 1. coconut.
  • Etymology 3. Not in Yes + no. Catalan, Adjective, not 1. (of things such as trees, mountains, houses, etc.).

Anu / Danu (Anunnaki / Anunna) is called "the mother of the Irish gods."

In Egypt, she was known Iusaaset.

In ancient Ellada, Danu was known as Demeter.

Danu was known as Anu in ancient Sumer.

Hinduism also refers to Anu.

The Sumerian Anu, the Hindu Anu, Demeter / Iusaaset and the Danu of the Tuath (a) Dé Danann are one and the same.

Danann is a conflation of dan ("skill, craft") and the goddess name Anann.

The name is also found as Donann and Domnann, * don, meaning "earth (Demeter / Poseidon / Danu / Brigid / Cybele).

A poem in the Lebor Gabála Érenn is about the arrival of the Tuath De Danann.

  • It is God who suffered them, though He restrained them
  • they landed with horror, with lofty deed,
  • in their cloud of mighty combat of spectra,
  • on a mountain of Connaicne of Connacht.
  • Without distinction to descerning Ireland,
  • Without ships, a ruthless course
  • the truth was not known below the sky of stars,
  • whether they were of heaven or earth.

The Tuath De Danann eventually became the Aos Sí or "fairies."





BRIGID


Brigid, "exalted one," and the goddess of Tir on nóg (Atlantis / Karya).

Karya is the Greek word for Brigid.

Brigid, Karya, and Danu have one and the same.

She is a triple deity.

Her three aspects include:

  • Fire of Inspiration as a patroness of poetry.
  • Fire of the Hearth as a patroness of healing and fertility.
  • Fire of the Forge as a patroness of smithcraft.

She was the daughter of the Dagda, and the wife of Bres with whom she had a son called Ruadan (Rua-dan / red haired Dan).


Brígid invents keening (mourining / morning), a combination of weeping and singing, while mourning / Banshee (morning) for her son Ruadan, after he is slain while fighting for the Fomorians.


The animals were told to cry out a warning and thus Brigid is considered the guardian of domesticated animals.


Brigid is considered to be the goddess of the spring season, fertility, healing, poetry, smithing, medicine, arts and crafts, cattle (an ox, she had two: Fe and Men), and other livestock, and boar , sheep and a swan (an animal that unites the forms of a bird and a serpent). sacred / holy wells (Karya / Pigadisani (Pigadishani)), and the arrival of early spring.


The ancient Roman equivalent to Brigid is Minerva.

The ancient Greek (Hellenic) equivalent to Brigid is Karya, Athena, Aphrodite, Hera, Demeter, and Eos among others.


Brigid is also the goddess of all things perceived to be of relatively high dimensions such as high-rising flames, highlands, hills, hill-forts and upland areas; and of activities and states conceived as psychologically lofty and elevated, such as wisdom, excellence, perfection, high intelligence, poetic eloquence, craftsmanship (especially blacksmithing), healing ability, druidic knowledge and skill in warfare.

Brigid is also associated with the home and hearth.


She is also linked to prophecy, divination, agriculture and livestock, feminine arts and crafts.

Brigid is also known as Brigit, Brigid, Brighid, Bríde, Brìd, Brìg, Brigantia, Breo-Saighead, Breo Aigit (Gaelic), Ffraid (Welsh), Mary of the Gael, Saint Brigid (Catholic).

The etymology of the word Brigit and Brigid comes from Bri + git, Brig + it, Brig + id.


  • Etymology 1. Bri, From Proto-Albanian * brina, from pre-Albanian * bʰr̥nos, from Proto-Indo-European * bʰrendos 'stag, red deer' (compare Swedish brinde, Lithuanian bríedis, Messapic bréndon). Alternatively from Proto-Indo-European * h3bhruH- (eye), though the semantic development would be unique for this root.
  • Etymology 2nd Breast, From Old Irish Breasts, from Proto-Celtic * brixs.
  • The etymology of the word brixs is Proto-Celtic, From Proto-Indo-European * bʰr̥ʰ,, from * bʰerʰʰ- ("high"). Cognate with Proto-Germanic * burgz. Noun * brixs f 1st hill (kick). Derived terms * Brigantī.
  • The etymology of the word Brigantī is Proto-Celtic, Proper noun, * Brigantī f, Brigantia, Brigid (name and goddess). Brigantia, Latin, Proper noun, Brigantia f (genitive, Brigantiae); first declension, (Celtic mythology) 1. A Celtic goddess of victory. Descendants, Middle Cornish: bre, Norwegian Bokmål, Noun, bre m (definite singular breen) 1. a glacier.
  • Etymology 3. bri, Welsh, From Proto-Celtic * brīgos ("force"), from Proto-Indo-European * gʷrih2-g-, and suffixed extended form of * groměréh₂us ("heavy") (compare Latin gravis, Ancient Greek Heavy (barús), and Sanskrit गुरु (gurú).
  • The etymology of the word heavy (barús) is Greek, Related terms, sweet sweet (varýs glykós, "very sweet").
  • Etymology 4. Bri, from English, Proper noun, Bri. 1. A diminutive of the female name Brianna, or Bridget, or Britney, or, rarely, Britannia.
  • The etymology of the word Britannia is from English, 1. A female personification of Britain or the United Kingdom. 2. (historical) A province of the Roman Empire covering most of the island of Britain.
  • Etymology 5. Bri, Albanian, Noun, bri m (indefinite plural brirë, definite singular briri) 1. horn. Derived terms brith. A formation from bri, often occurring in metathesized form of birth.
  • Eymology 6. Bri, Welsh, From Proto-Celtic * brīgos ("power"), from Proto-Indo-European * gʷrih2-g-, and suffixed extended form of * gʷréh2us ("heavy") (compare Latin gravis, Ancient Greek Heavy (barús), and Sanskrit गुरु (gurú) Noun bri m (uncountable) -honour, -esteem Synonyms, anrhydedd, parch.

The etymology of the word git used to form the word Bri + git.


  • Etymology 1. git, English, From Middle English, get ("offspring," especially "illegitimate offspring," (ie, Semite / Hebrew). (from Online Etymology Dictionary).
  • Etymology 2, git, (Bri + git), from Dutch, noun git n, 1. (neuter) jet (black, gemstone-like geological material).

The etymology of the word Brig used to form the word Brig + it.


  • Etymology 1. Brig is English, Noun, Brig (brigs) 1. (nautical) A two-masted vessel, square-rigged on both foremast and mainmast. A Brig-rigged vessel. 2. (US) A jail or guardhouse, especially in a naval military prison or jail on a ship, navy base, or (in fiction) spacecraft. See also hermaphrodite brig. Brig, Polabian, From Proto-Slavic * berg. Noun brig m, bank, shore (of a river). Brig, Welsh, Noun brig m (plural brigau) crest, peak, summit, top, kick.
  • Etymology 2. Brig, from Scots, Noun, brig 1st bridge.
  • The etymology of the word bridge is English, Noun bridge 1. A construction or natural feature that spans a divide.
  • The etymology of the word "it" used to form the word Brig + it.
  • Etymology 1. "It." English, Noun it (plural its). One who is neither a he nor a she; the creature; and a dehumanized being.
  • Etymology 2. "it", from Azeri, Noun, it (Cyrillic spelling) 1. dog. The semi-palindrome or half-palindrome of the dog is God (eg, lap / pal, dog / god). Dog also refers to Dog Star, which is the star Sirius in the Canis Major constellation.
  • Etymology 3. "It," Charrua, Noun it 1. fire.
  • Etymology 4. "it", Chuukese, Noun it 1. name.
  • Etymology 5. "it", from Crimean Tatar Synonyms köpek. 
  • The etymology of the word köpek is from Crimean Tatar Noun, köpek dog. The semi-palindrome or half-palindrome of the dog is God (eg, lap / pal, dog / god). Dog also refers to Dog Star, which is the star Sirius in the Canis Major constellation.
  • Etymology 6. "it", from Irish, Alternative forms id.
  • The etymology of the id is from English, noun id (plural ids) Anagram Sid.
  • The etymology of the word of the word sid is Swedish, Abbreviation, sid, Abbreviation of sida. Volapük, Noun, sid (plural sids) 1. seed.
  • The etymology of the word of the word sida is Norwegian Nynorsk, Noun, sida f 1. definite singular of side.
  • Etymology 2nd side, A line of descent traced through one parent as distinct from that traced through another.
  • Etymology 3rd Side, from Manx, From Old Irish saiget, from Latin sagitta. Noun, side f (genitive singular side, plural sideyn) 1. arrow, Descendants, Irish: saighead, Manx: side.
  • Etymology 4th, from Middle Irish, Etymology, From Old Irish. Noun, side m 1. and fairy hill or mound (kick). 2. (in plural) = áes side ("people of the fairy mounds, supernatural beings, fairies"). TheTuatha Dé Danann.
  • Etymology 1. id, the Synonym is lizard brain.
  • Etymology 2. id, from English, noun id (plural ids) Alternative spelling of ide.
  • Etymology 3. id Latin, From the pronominal Proto-Indo-European * i-; see also Old Church Slavonic onus (he, "he"), Lithuanian ans ("he").
  • The etymology of the idea is English, From French ide, from Scientific Latin idus (species name), from Swedish id. Noun ide (plural ides). 1. A freshwater fish of the family Cyprinidae, found across northern Europe and Asia, Leuciscus idus. See also ides. Ides, English. Noun ides (plural ides) 1. In the Roman calendar, the fifteenth day of March, May, July, October, and the thirteenth day of the other months. Eight days after the nones. Anagrams -side. Ide, Old English, From Proto-Germanic * dīsiz ("goddess"), from Proto-Indo-European * dʰēs- ("sacred one, saint, hallow, god, deity"). Cognate with Old Saxon idis, Old High German itis, Old Norse dís. Ides Noun ides f (poetic) virgin, lady, woman (especially when noble or magical), queen. Ides, Portuguese, Verb ides,
  • The etymology of "ir" is Galician ir, From Latin to. English ir, From Middle English ire, yre, shortened form of iren ("iron"). Norwegian Bokmål Noun irem (defined singular iren, indefinite plural irer, defined irene) 1. person from Ireland, Irishman. Old French Noun ire f (oblique plural ires, nominative singular ire, nominative plural ires) 1. ire, anger, rage.
  • Etymology 2. ir, from Kaera, Noun ir water. Latin, Noun ir n (no genitive); irregular declension 1. (rare, anatomy) hand.
  • she, it) is; 3rd person singular present indicative form of būt. Etymology 2 From Proto-Baltic *, from the reduced degree * of Proto-Indo-European * ar ("so, then; question particle") (whence also Latvian ar, qv). The original meaning "and" (cf. Lithuanian cognate) is found in the 16th and 17th century texts, but since the 18th century on it was no longer used in this sense. Cognates include Lithuanian ir ("and"), Old Prussian ir ("also"), er ("(along) with"), Ancient Greek āra, ár, ), "So, then, then"). Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonymsm arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it. 3rd person singular present indicative form of būt. Etymology 2 From Proto-Baltic *, from the reduced degree * of Proto-Indo-European * ar ("so, then; question particle") (whence also Latvian ar, qv). The original meaning "and" (cf. Lithuanian cognate) is found in the 16th and 17th century texts, but since the 18th century on it was no longer used in this sense. Cognates include Lithuanian ir ("and"), Old Prussian ir ("also"), er ("(along) with"), Ancient Greek āra, ár, ), "So, then, then"). Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonymsm arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it. 3rd person singular present indicative form of būt. Etymology 2 From Proto-Baltic *, from the reduced degree * of Proto-Indo-European * ar ("so, then; question particle") (whence also Latvian ar, qv). The original meaning "and" (cf. Lithuanian cognate) is found in the 16th and 17th century texts, but since the 18th century on it was no longer used in this sense. Cognates include Lithuanian ir ("and"), Old Prussian ir ("also"), er ("(along) with"), Ancient Greek āra, ár, ), "So, then, then"). Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonymsm arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it. Etymology 2 From Proto-Baltic *, from the reduced degree * of Proto-Indo-European * ar ("so, then; question particle") (whence also Latvian ar, qv). The original meaning "and" (cf. Lithuanian cognate) is found in the 16th and 17th century texts, but since the 18th century on it was no longer used in this sense. Cognates include Lithuanian ir ("and"), Old Prussian ir ("also"), er ("(along) with"), Ancient Greek āra, ár, ), "So, then, then"). Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonymsm arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it. Etymology 2 From Proto-Baltic *, from the reduced degree * of Proto-Indo-European * ar ("so, then; question particle") (whence also Latvian ar, qv). The original meaning "and" (cf. Lithuanian cognate) is found in the 16th and 17th century texts, but since the 18th century on it was no longer used in this sense. Cognates include Lithuanian ir ("and"), Old Prussian ir ("also"), er ("(along) with"), Ancient Greek āra, ár, ), "So, then, then"). Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonymsm arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it. from the reduced grade * r̥ of Proto-Indo-European * ar ("so, then; question particle") (whence also Latvian ar ("with"), qv). The original meaning "and" (cf. Lithuanian cognate) is found in the 16th and 17th century texts, but since the 18th century on it was no longer used in this sense. Cognates include Lithuanian ir ("and"), Old Prussian ir ("also"), er ("(along) with"), Ancient Greek āra, ár, ), "So, then, then"). Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonymsm arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it. from the reduced grade * r̥ of Proto-Indo-European * ar ("so, then; question particle") (whence also Latvian ar ("with"), qv). The original meaning "and" (cf. Lithuanian cognate) is found in the 16th and 17th century texts, but since the 18th century on it was no longer used in this sense. Cognates include Lithuanian ir ("and"), Old Prussian ir ("also"), er ("(along) with"), Ancient Greek āra, ár, ), "So, then, then"). Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonymsm arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it. Lithuanian cognate) is found in 16th and 17th-century texts, but from the 18th century on was no longer used in this sense. Cognates include Lithuanian ir ("and"), Old Prussian ir ("also"), er ("(along) with"), Ancient Greek āra, ár, ), "So, then, then"). Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonymsm arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it. Lithuanian cognate) is found in 16th and 17th-century texts, but from the 18th century on was no longer used in this sense. Cognates include Lithuanian ir ("and"), Old Prussian ir ("also"), er ("(along) with"), Ancient Greek āra, ár, ), "So, then, then"). Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonymsm arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it. Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonymsm arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it. Synonyms kā ... tā. Synonymsm arī (Mars). Spanish Verb ir (first-person singular present voy, first-person singular preterite fui, past participle ido) 1. to go 2. (reflexive) to go away, to leave. See irse. Yapese, Pronoun ir, Third-person singular pronoun; he, she, it.
  • Etymology 2. Ide, from Haitian Creole, From French idée ("idea"). Hungarian, Adverb ide (comparative idébb, superlative legidébb) 1. here 2. hither, this way. Ide, Macuna, Noun is 1. water. Malay, Noun id 1. feast day. Maltese, Noun id f (plural idejn) (anatomy) hand. Swedish Noun id c ide; and fish, Leuciscus idus (Lefkas-idas).


Another name for Brigid is Breo Saighead (the fiery arrow).


Brigid was also a dawn goddess.

The etymology of the word dawn.


  • Etymology 1. dawn, English, Back-formation from dawning. (If the noun rather than the verb is primary, the noun could directly continue dawing.) From daw, from Proto-Germanic * dagāną, from Proto-Germanic * dagaz ("day" Dagda). Noun, dawns (uncountable) The morning twilight period immediately before sunrise. 1. (counting) The rising of the sun. 2. (uncountable) The time when the sun rises. 3. (uncountable) The beginning. the dawn of civilization. See also morning.
  • Etymology 2nd dawn, Maltese, dawn, plural of dan.
  • The etymology of the word morning, English, Pronunciation, Homophone: mourning, English, Noun, mourning 1. The act of expressing or feeling sorrow or regret; lamentation. 2. Feeling or expressing sorrow over someone's death. 3. The traditional clothes worn by those who mourn (in Western societies, typically colored black). 4. Drapes or coverings associated with mourning. 


A dawn goddess is a deity who is in some sense associated with the dawn.

Dawn or astronomical dawn is the time that marks, depending on the specific usage, the beginning of the twilight before the sunrise, the period of the pre-sunrise twilight or the time of the sunrise .

Examples of dawn goddesses. 

Greek Eos - In Greek mythology, Ēōs Ionic and Homeric Greek Ἠ,, Attic Ἕως Éōs, "dawn," Aeolic Aὔos Aúōs, Doric As Āṓs-Āṓs Si) is a Titaness and the goddess of the dawn, who rose every morning / mourning from home games at the edge of the Oceanus. Eos had a brother and a sister, Helios, god of the sun, and Selene, goddess of the moon.

Etruscan mythology, Thesan was the Etruscan Goddess of the dawn, divination, and childbirth (as well as a love-goddess) and was associated with the generation of life. Thesan was depicted on several Etruscan mirror backs, bearing a great pair of wings on her back like many other Etruscan goddesses, especially appropriate to a sky-goddess. One meaning of Her name is simply "Dawn," and related words are thesi, meaning "illumination," and thesviti, "clear or famous". The other meaning of her name connects her with the ability to see the future, for thesaan also means "divination," as seen in the related Etruscan word thesanthei, "divining," "illuminating," or "brilliant." function as a dawn goddess - since divination throws light on the dark future and allows one to see what may happen, like the dawn, which illuminates what was previously dark. She was called by some as a childbirth goddess, as she was present at the beginning of the day, which finds her parallel at the beginning of a new baby's life. Similar to the Roman goddess Lucina, goddess of Light and Childbirth, who brought the infant into the light of day. Onshore mirror back Thesan is shown in the act of abducting Cephalus (kick), and a young man of Athens who was married to King Erechtheus' daughter, Procris. Thesan is winged here, wearing a chiton and diagonal hemation that flows into the breeze; about her head is a halo, she emphasizes her function as Light-Goddess. She runs off to the left carrying Cephalus (kick) in her arms. Cephalus / Kephalos is a name used for the hero-figure in Greek mythology and carried as a theophoric name by historical persons. The word kephalos is Greek for "head" (Kop). Cephalus was also the founding "head" of a great family that includes Odysseus. Cephalus means the head of the Sun who kills (evaporates) Procris (dew) with his unerring ray or 'javelin.' Cephalus was one of the lovers of the dawn goddess Eos / Brigid. Cephalus was a Aeolian, the son of Deion, the ruler of Phocis, and Diomede, and grandson of Aeolus. The Liber Lintaeus connects this goddess Thesan with the Etruscan sun-deity Usil, equivalent of the Greek Helios, while a fourth century mirror now shows her in conversation with both Usil and Nethuns (the latter, the Etruscan Neptune / Poseidon). Cephalus means the head of the Sun who kills (evaporates) Procris (dew) with his unerring ray or 'javelin.' Cephalus was one of the lovers of the dawn goddess Eos / Brigid. Cephalus was a Aeolian, the son of Deion, the ruler of Phocis, and Diomede, and grandson of Aeolus. The Liber Lintaeus connects this goddess Thesan with the Etruscan sun-deity Usil, equivalent of the Greek Helios, while a fourth century mirror now shows her in conversation with both Usil and Nethuns (the latter, the Etruscan Neptune / Poseidon). Cephalus means the head of the Sun who kills (evaporates) Procris (dew) with his unerring ray or 'javelin.' Cephalus was one of the lovers of the dawn goddess Eos / Brigid. Cephalus was a Aeolian, the son of Deion, the ruler of Phocis, and Diomede, and grandson of Aeolus. The Liber Lintaeus connects this goddess Thesan with the Etruscan sun-deity Usil, equivalent of the Greek Helios, while a fourth century mirror now shows her in conversation with both Usil and Nethuns (the latter, the Etruscan Neptune / Poseidon).

Germanic stamps: The chest is a Germanic goddess. Œostre is a goddess of Spring, and the festival of Easter is named after her. The word Ēostre is traced to the goddess of dawn Hausos.

Hindu Ushas-Ushas (उषस्; uṣas) is also a Vedic goddess of dawn in Hinduism.



She is portrayed as a beautifully adorned young woman riding in a golden chariot or hundred chariots, drawn by golden red horses or cows, on her path across the sky, making way for Vedic sun god Surya.

Roman Aurora (and later Mater Matuta) -Aurora renews herself every morning / mourning and flies across the sky, announcing the arrival of the sun. Her parentage was flexible: for Ovid, she could equally be Pallantis, signifying the daughter of Pallas, 1. or the daughter of Hyperion. 2. She has two siblings, and a brother (Sol, the sun) and a sister (Luna, the moon). Roman writers rarely imitate Hesiod and later Greek poets by naming Aurora as the mother of the Anemoi (the Winds), who were the offspring of Astraeus, the father of the stars.

Slavic Zorya: In Slavic mythology, Zorya = "Dawn"; Zorza in Polish, Zara-Zaranica (Belarusian: Zara-Zaranitsa, Zvezda, Zwezda, Danica = "Star") are the two guardian goddesses, known as the Auroras. Aurora (Latin: [au̯roːra]) is the Latin word for dawn, and the goddess of dawn in Roman mythology and Latin poetry. 

Hausos is the personification of dawn as a beautiful young woman. 

The name Hausos * h₂éwsōs is derived from a root * h₂ews- "to glow, shine" (usually translated as "to become light or red, dawn; east"), thus translating it's "the glowing, shining one."

Both the English word east and the Latin austerity "south wind, south" is a root related adjective * h₂ews-t (e) ro-.

Also related is aurum "gold,

The dawn goddess was also the goddess of the spring, involved in the mythology of the Indo-European New Year, where the dawn goddess was liberated from imprisonment by a god (reflected in Rigveda as Indra, in Greek mythology as Dionysus (Osiris / Dagda ) and Cronus, along with

the name most amenable to reconstruction, some of the epithets of the dawn goddess can be reconstructed with some certainty, 

among which is * wénhõos (also an s-stem), whence Sanskrit vanas "loveliness; used by Uṣas in the Rigveda, and the Latin name Venus / Aphrodite and the Norse Vanir.

The name indicates that the goddess was imagined as a beautiful nubile woman who also had aspects of a love goddess.

The love goddess aspect was separated from the personification of dawn in some traditions, including Roman Venus vs. Aurora, and Greek Aphrodite Eos.

However, the name of Aphrodite (Aphrodite) still preserves her role as a dawn goddess, etymologized as "she who shines from the foam" (from aphros "foam" and deato "to shine").

The abduction and imprisonment of the dawn goddess and her liberation by a heroic god slaying the dragon who imprisons her is a central myth of Indo-European religion, reflected in numerous traditions.

Most notably, it is the central myth of the Rigveda, a collection of hymns surrounding the Soma rituals dedicated to Indra in the new year celebrations of the early Indo-Aryans.

Indra is a Vedic deity in Hinduism, and a guardian deity in Buddhism, and the king of the first heaven called Saudharmakalpa in Jainism. 

His mythologies and powers are similar to those of Indo-European deities such as Zeus, Jupiter, Perun, Thor, and Odin (Wotan).

In the Vedas, Indra is the king of Svarga (Heaven) and the Devas.

He is the god of lightning, thunder, storms, rains and river flows.

Indra is the most referenced deity in the Rigveda.

Indra is celebrated for his powers, and one who kills the great symbolic evil (Asura) named Vritra who obstructs human prosperity and happiness.

Indra destroys Vritra and his "deceiving forces," and thus brings rain and sunshine as the friend of mankind.

Asuras has lord beings in Indian texts who compete for power with the more benevolent devas (also known as suras).

Asuras has powerful superhuman demigods or demons with good or bad qualities.

The good Asuras are called Adityas and are led by Varuna, while the evil ones are called Danavas and are led by Vritra.

In the early Vedic religion, Vritra (Sanskrit: वृत्र, vṛtra, lit. 'enveloper') is a serpent or dragon, the personification of the drought and adversary of Indra.

In Hinduism, Vritra is identified as an Asura.

Vritra was also known in the Vedas as Ahi (Sanskrit: अहि ahi, lit. 'snake').

He appears as a dragon blocking the course of the rivers and is heroically slaughtered by Indra.

In Vedic mythology, the Danavas (Balinese Hinduism Dewi Danu) were a race descending from Daksha.

The Danavas were the sons of Danu, who in turn was a daughter of Daksha.

Dakṣa (alerted one) is one of the sons of Lord Brahma

Danu is connected with the waters of the heavens and she is associated with the formless, primordial waters that existed before the creation. 

The name is associated with the Proto-Indo-European (PIE) root * danu, 'river' or 'any flowing liquid' and is associated with Danu (Asura).

Under the leadership of Bali and others, the Danavas revolted against the Devatas (Devas).

Despite initial successes, the Danava were defeated by the god Vamana who in dwarf form deceived their leader Bali.

The Danavas were not universally considered to be evil; individually Danava could be classified as good or bad.

Sheffield is a city and metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire, England. 

The area now occupied by the City of Sheffield is believed to have been inhabited since at least the late Upper Paleolithic, about 12,800 years ago.

In the Iron Age, the area became the southernmost territory of the Pennine tribe called the Brigantes.

The Brigantes were a Celtic tribe who in pre-Roman times controlled the largest section of what would become Northern England.

In modern Welsh, the word braint means 'privilege, prestige' and comes from the same root * brigantī. 

Other related forms from the modern Celtic languages ​​are: Welsh brenin 'king' (<* brigantīnos); Welsh / Cornish / Breton bri 'prestige, reputation, honour, dignity', Scottish Gaelic brīgh 'pith, power', irish 'energy, significance', Manx bree 'power, energy' (all <brīg- / brigi-) ; and Welsh / Cornish / Breton bre 'hill'- ie kick (<* brigā).

The name Brigantīm comes from Bridget.

Brigid also possessed the king of boars, Torc Triath (boar), and Cirb, the king of wethers (sheep), from whom Mag Cirb is named.



BANSHEE


A banshee; Modern Irish bean net, baintsí, from Old Irish: brides, "woman of the fairy mound" or "woman of the fairy Kop" is a female spirit in which she heralds the death of a family member, usually by wailing, shrieking , or keening.


Brígid invented keening (mourining / morning), a combination of weeping and singing.


Brigid, Danu, and Banshee have one and the same.

The name banshee is linked to the important tumuli or "mounds" (Kop) that dot the Irish countryside, which is known as the singular seat in Old Irish.

A tumulus is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves.

The word tumulus is Latin for 'mound' or 'small hill' (ie, Kop).

The etymology of the word ben + sude, ban + shee, baint + sude, ban-sidhe, ban + sidhe.

  • The etymology of the word ben used to form the word ben + side. Ben, English, From Middle English ben, bene, from Old English bēn ("prayer").
  • The etymology of the word prayer, English From the Middle English preiere, from the English-Latin prerie, from the Old French preere, from the Medieval Latin or Late Latin precāria (pre-caria / karya), the feminine (fe + ("Obtained by entreaty"), from precor ("beg, entreat"). Noun, prayer (countable and uncountable, plural prayers). 1. Practice of communicating with one's God. 2. The act of praying. (for the etymology of the word caria / karya see below).
  • The word 'beggen', from English, from English to Middle * beggen, assimilation from Old English * becgan, * bedcan, * bedican, syncopated variants of Old English Bedecian ("to beg"), perhaps from Proto-Germanic * bedagô ; requestor; beggar "), from * bedą, * bedō (" prayer; request "). Related to North Frisian bēdagi ("to pray"), Gothic 𐌱𐌹𐌳𐌰𐌲𐍅𐌰 (bidagwa, "beggar"), Old English biddan ("to ask").
  • Etymology 2. beg, Abbreviation beg (knitting) 1. begin. 

John 1 King James Version (KJV).


  • In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

  • The etymology of the word precarius is Latin, adjective precārius (feminine precāria, neuter precārium); first / second declension, 1. precarious.
  • The etymology of the word precarious is English, from Latin precary, from prex, precise ("prayer"). Compare French Precision, Portuguese Prevario, and Spanish and Italian precario. Adjective, (law) Depending on the intention of another.
  • The etymology of the word law is English From the Middle English law, from the Old English lagu ("law"), from Old Norse * lagu, an early plural form of Old Norse lag, order, measure, stroke, law, literally "something laid down or fixed"), from Proto-Germanic * lagą ("that is laid down"), from Proto-Indo-European * legʰ- . Cognate with Icelandic lög ("things laid down, law"), Swedish lag ("law"), Danish hunting ("law"). Replaced Old English ǣ and ġesetnes. More at lay. Noun law (countable and uncountable, plural laws). 1. The body of binding rules and regulations, customs and standards established in a community by its legislative and judicial authorities. a. The body of such rules that relate to a particular topic. b. property law; commercial hunting and fishing law. c. Common law,
  • The etymology of the word equity, Noun equity (counting and uncountable, plural equity) 1. Ownership,
  • The etymology of the word ownership is English, owner + ship. 
  • The etymology of the word Owner is English, Noun owner (plural owners) 1. One who owns something.
  • The etymology of the word ship is English (nautical, slang) The captain of a ship.
  • The etymology of Common law is English, Noun, common law (uncountable).

  1. (law) The law developed by the judges, courts, and agency adjudicatory tribunals, through their decisions and opinions (also called case law) (as opposed to statutes promulgated by legislatures and regulations promulgated by the executive branch).
  2. (law) Legal system mainly in England and its former colonies with a heavy emphasis on judged law, rather than codified statutes (as opposed to civil law), deduced by casuistry instead of general principles.
  3. (law, historical) The body of law and procedure administered in certain courts (known as law courts) in England and its former colonies, characterized by a rigid system of writs, with a limited set of remedies (as opposed to equity or admiralty).
  4. (law, Scottish law, Roman-Dutch law) Law of general application throughout the country, province or state, as opposed to law having only a special or local application.

  • Synonyms

  1. case law, decision-making law, precedent law.

  • Antonyms

  1. statutes
  2. equity, admiralty
  3. civil law, Roman law, ius commune, canon law, ecclesiastical law.

  • Etymology 2nd law, From Old English hlāw ("burial mound"). Also spelled low. Noun law (plural laws)
  1. (obsolete) A tumulus of stones.
  2. (Scotland and Northern England, archaic) A hill (Kop).
  • Etymology 3. law of the word lawks, (dated) An exclamation of mild surprise; lawks. Anagrams
  • WAL.
  • The etymology of the word lawks is English, Interjection lawks 1. (Britain, dialectal) Lord! (especially as an expression of surprise) Synonyms 1. Lord, Lords,
  • Etymology 4. Law, Lower Sorbian From Proto-Slavic * from the Proto-Indo-European * lewo-.Noun law m (diminutive lawk, feminine equivalent lawowka) 1. lion ("Panthera leo").
  • Etymology 5. law, Scots, Noun law (plural laws) 

  1. law
  2. rounded hill (usually conical, often isolated or conspicuous).
  • Etymology 6. law, Welsh, Noun law
  1. Soft mutation of glaw ("rain"). Noun law 1. Soft mutation of llaw ("hand").
  • Etymology 2. ben, From Middle English ben, bene, variation of bin, binne ("inside"), from Old English binnan ("inside, in, inside of"), equivalent to be- + in.
  • Etymology 3. Probably representing a North African pronunciation of Arabic بان (bān, "ben tree" / copse). Noun, ben (plural bens). 1. A tree, Moringa oleifera or horseradish tree of Arabia and India, which produces oil of ben. 2. The winged seed of the tree. 3. Oil of the Ben seed. Synonyms- (tree): drumstick tree, horseradish tree, moringa.
  • Etymology 4. From Arabic بن (bin) and Hebrew בן (ben, "son"). Noun, ben (uncountable). 1. (Usually capitalized) Son of (used with Hebrew and Arabic surnames).
  • Etymology 5. Borrowed from Scots Ben, benn, from Scottish Gaelic beinn, Noun, ben (plural bens) 1. A Scottish or Irish mountain or high peak.
  • The etymology of the word kop is English, Afrikaans, Noun kop 1. (South Africa) A hill or mountain.
  • Etymology 6. Ben, Faroese, From Old Norse ben, from Proto-Germanic * banjō. Noun ben n (genitive singular bens, plural ben) 1. wound.
  • Etymology 7. Ben, Friulian, From Latin Bene. Adverb ben 1. well.
  • The etymology of the word well is English From Middle English wel, wal, wol, wele, from Old English wel, wæl, well ("well, abundantly, very, very easy"), from Proto-Germanic * wela, * wala ("well", literally "as wished, as desired"), from Proto-Indo-European * welh-1. Cognate with Scots wele, weil (well), North Frisian wel, weil, wal ("well"), lowland wol ("well" , German wol, wohl ("well"), Norwegian and Danish vel ("well"), Swedish väl ("well"), Icelandic vel, val ("well"). Related to will.
  • Etymology 2. Well, 1. A hole falls into the ground as a source of water. 2. A place where a liquid such as water surfaces naturally; and spring. 3. The open space between the bench and the counseling tables in a courtroom. 4. (video games) The playfield of Tetris and similar video games, in which the blocks fall. 
  • Etymology 7. Ben, Manx, From Old Irish Ben, from Proto-Celtic * benā, from Proto-Indo-European * gʷḗn. Noun ben f (genitive singular mreih, plural mraane) 1. woman.
  • Etymology 8. Ben, Middle English Verb bēn 1. to be.
  • Etymology 9. Ben Old English, Descendants English: bee.
  • Etymology 10. Ben Old Irish, From Proto-Celtic * benā, from Proto-Indo-European * gʷḗn. Noun ben f (genitive mna, nominative plural mna) 1. woman. Derived terms benacan m ("(little) woman"). Descendants, Irish: bean. Manx: ben. Scottish Gaelic: bean.
  • Etymology 11. ben Hebrew בֵּן (ben) Noun ben 1. son (sun). Synonyms macc. 
  • Most, though not all, surnames associated with banshees have the Ó or Mc / Mac prefix - that is, surnames of Goidelic origin, indicating a native family to the Insular Celtic lands rather than those of English, Norse, (Viking / Semitic) , or Norman (Viking / Semitic) invaders.
  • Ó Kopsidas is how one refers to Kopsidas in the Hellenic language.  
  • Goidelic. adjectives. 1. referring to or denoting the northern group of Celtic languages, including Irish, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx. Speakers of the Celtic precursor of the Goidelic languages ​​are thought to have invaded Ireland from Europe c. 1000 BC, spreading into Scotland and the Isle of Man from the 5th century AD onwards.
  • Etymology 12. Ben, Danish From Old Norse bein ("bone"), from Proto-Germanic * bainą.
  • Etymology 13. Amele. ben adjective ben 1, big.
  • Ben + ben / benben. Benben was the mound that originated from the primordial waters of which the creator god Atum settled in the creation story of the Heliopolitan form of Ancient Egyptian religion. The Benben stone (also known as a pyramidion) is the top (Kop) stone of the Egyptian pyramid. It is also related to the Obelisk. The Benben stone, named after the mound, was a sacred stone in the temple of Ra (Elatha / Elada) at Heliopolis (Egyptian: Annu or Iunu).
  • The word ban is used to describe the word ban + shee.
  • The etymology of the word copse, Rhymes: -that, Synonyms bush, bushes, forest, mott, orchard.
  • The etymology of the word shee used to form the word ban + shee. Manx, Shee, From Old Irish, Sith. Cognate with Irish Network ("fairy mound"). Noun shee m (genitive singular shee, plural sheeghyn) 1. fairy. Related terms 1. mooinjer veggey ("fairies").
  • The etymology of the word is Irish, Etymology From the Middle Irish side, from Old Irish ("fairy mound"). Alternative forms sidhe (superseded). Noun network (genitive singular network, nominative plural network) 1. fairy mound, tumulus.
  • The etymology of the word baint used to form the word baint + side. Irish, Noun baint f (singular genitive). 1. harvesting, (agriculture) The gathering of a mature crop; and harvest.
  • Etymology 2. baint, verbal noun of bain, English, From Middle English bain, bayne, bayn, beynn ("direct, prompt"), from Old Norse beinn ), from Proto-Germanic * bainaz ("straight"), from Proto-Indo-European * bhei- ("to hit, beat"). Cognate with Scots bein ("straight, direct, hospitable"), Norwegian bein ("straight, direct, hospitable" direct, easy to deal with "). See also bein. Alternative forms 1. bane (vane).
  • Etymology 3. bain, Bavarian, Noun bain, 1. (Sappada, Sauris, Timau) wine.
  • Etymology 4. bain, Irish, From a conflation of Old Irish benaid ("beat, strike") and boingid ("break, cut"). Alternative forms bean.
  • cut in the Greek language is cut (kicks).
  • Etymology 4. bain, Romansch From Latin bene. Adverb bain 1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) well. Noun bain m (plural bains). 1. (Puter, Vallader) farm.


The etymology of the word sidhe used to form the word ban + sidhe.


  • The etymology of the word side is Middle Irish. From Old Irish. Noun, side, and fairy hill (kick) or mound (kick) (in plural) = áes side ("people of the fairy mounds, supernatural beings, fairies"). Descendants, Irish Network. Alternative form sidhe. Supernatural creatures of Irish and Scottish folklore, who live in Sidhe. Related term, banshee / ban-sidhe.
  • Etymology 2nd side, A line of descent traced through one parent as distinct from that traced through another.
  • Etymology 3rd Side, from Manx, From Old Irish saiget, from Latin sagitta. Noun, side f (genitive singular side, plural sideyn) 1. arrow, Descendants, Irish: saighead, Manx: side.
  • Etymology 4. Side, from Middle Irish, From Old Irish. Noun, side m 1. and fairy hill or mound (kick). 2. (in plural) = áes side ("people of the fairy mounds, supernatural beings, fairies"). TheTuatha Dé Danann, ie, KopSida.
  • The etymology of the word of the word sid is Swedish, Abbreviation, sid, Abbreviation of sida. Volapük, Noun, sid (plural sids) 1. seed.
  • The etymology of the word of the word sida is norwegian nynorsk, noun, sida f 1. definite singular of side / sidhe.













THE DAGDA


The Dagda was a High King of the Tuatha Dé Danann.

The Dagda is the descendant of Danu and Elatha / Elada.

The Dagda wears a short, rough tunic dragging his great penis on the ground.

He is a father-figure, chieftain, and druid (Kop Sidas).


The Dagda is associated with fertility, agriculture, manliness and strength, as well as magic, druidry and wisdom.


The Dagda means "the good god" or "the great god".

Dáire also appears to have been another name for the Dagda.

The Dagda is linked to the harvest god (s) Crom Cruach and Crom Dubh, as well as with the death and ancestral god Donn.

The Dagda has been likened to the Germanic god Odin and the Gaulish god Sucellos.


The Dagda and Sucellos are one and the same.

The Dagda also known by the epithets Eochu or Eochaid Ollathair, Ruad Rofhessa, "Many-skilled", Samildanach ("many-skilled"), Aed "fire"), Cerrce (striker), Cera (meaning "creator"), Fer Benn ("horned man" or "man of the peak"), Easal, Eogabal, Crom- / copse), and Ebron (meaning a cauldron / holy grail / cup / kick).

The holy grail of the Arthurian legend is sometimes referred to as a "cauldron", although traditionally sometimes the grail is thought of as a hand-held cup than the big pot that the word "cauldron" is usually used to mean

Dagda ' 

The Dagda (Osiris / Kop-sidas) was a figure of immense power, wearing a short, rough tunic and armed with a magic club. 

The club was supposed to be able to kill nine men with one blow; but with the handle he could return the slain to life. 

The cauldron was known as the Undry and was said to be bottomless, from which no man left unsatisfied. 

Uaithne, also known as "The Four Angled Music," was a richly ornamented magical harp made of oak (kick) which, when the Dagda played it, put the seasons in their correct order; and to command the battle order.

He possessed two pigs, one of which was always growing while the other was always roasting, and ever-laden fruit trees (copse). 

Uaithne is the harp that belongs to The Dagda. 

It is sometimes called Dur du Blah, The Oak (kick) of Two Blossoms, and sometimes Coir cethar chuin, the Four Angled Music.

The name Dagda / Daghda / Dag + ida can also mean "shining divinity".

The etymology of the word Dagda / Daghda / Dag + ida.

Etymology 1. Dag, from English, Dew. The homophone is Yew, Jew, dew. (Beltane dew).
Etymology 2. Dag, Noun (plural dags) 1. (mainly Ireland).
Etymology 3. Dag, Afrikaans, From Dutch dag ("day"), cognate with German Tag. Noun dag (dae, diminutive daggie) 1. a day
Etymology 4. Dag, Afrikaans, From Dutch dacht. Alternative forms, dog. The semi-palindrome or half-palindrome of the dog is God (eg, lap / pal, dog / god). Dog also refers to Dog Star, which is the star Sirius in the Canis Major constellation.
Etymology 5. Dag, Danish, Etymology From Old Danish dagh, from Old Norse dagr, from Proto-Germanic * dagaz ("day"), from Proto-Indo-European * dʰegʷʰ- ("to burn").
Etymology 6. Dag, Dutch, From Middle Dutch dach, from Old Dutch dag, from Proto-Germanic * dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European * dʰegʷʰ- ("to burn, to be illuminated"). Cognate with German Tag, West Frisian dei, English day, Danish dag. Noun dag m (dagen, diminutive dagje n or daagje n) day (period of 24 hours), daytime (time between sunrise and sunset). In archaic or dialectal usage, the older plural form may appear after numerals. On rare occasions, the expression veertien daag ("a fortnight") is still found in contemporary Dutch. Synonyms (24 hours) etmaal n.
Etymology 7. Dag, Turkmen, From Old Turkic tag, from Proto-Turkic * tāg, * dāg ("mountain"). Noun dag (defined accusative dagy, plural daglar) 1. mountain (ie Kop).
The etymology of the word Sida is from Modern Latin, from Hellenic sidē 'pomegranate tree', also 'water lily.'
Etymology 2. Sida, English-noun (plural sidas), from the genus name meaning water lily or pomegranate. The word "sida" derives from the writings of Theophrastus, who was a pupil of Aristotle. Aristotle left his original manuscripts and library to Theophrastus. Aristotle was a pupil of Plato and Plato was a pupil of Socrates.
Etymology 3. Sida. Bodb Sida and Femen ('from mound in Femen', ie, Tir na nóg / Atlantis). Bodb Sida was a son of the Dagda, and the successor son of Dagda as king of the Tuatha Dé Danann.
The etymology of the word Kops, ie kops / copse = a small group of trees especially live Oak (Dagda / Daghda / Dag-ida) or Elm (El-m / Elatha / Danu) , orchard (pomegranates), stand, tree, wood, coppice, bush, brush. (Grove-Druidism, Wicca) A place of worship.
The etymology of the word ida used to form the word Dag + ida.
The etymology of the word Ida-s = Mount Ida in Crete and Mount Ida in Phrygia. East or Easter. Idas and Sidas also mean eternal soul. March.
The etymology of the word da used to form the word Dag-da is from English, noun da (plural das) - (Ireland, Scotland, Northern England) Father.
Etymology 2. da from Dalmatian From Latin de ab. Compare Italian yes. Preposition da, 1. from. 2. of.
Etymology 3. da from Ewe, Noun da 1. bow 2. mother 3. snake.
Etymology 4. da from North Frisian See also di, jü. 
The etymology of the word jü is from North Frisian Pronoun, jü 1. she. Etymology 6. yes. Welsh, From Proto-Celtic * dagos ("good") (compare Irish dea-). Adjective da (female singular da, plural da, equative cystal, comparative gwell, superlative gorau), good, well. Noun da m, goodness (collective noun) goods, cattle. Etymology 7. da. Zhuang, Noun da 1. eye. Etymology 8. yes, yes = earth.
Etymology 5. da from Vanimo Noun da 1. pig.




While Aengus was away, the Dagda shared his land among his children, but Aengus returned to discover that nothing had been saved for him. Under the guidance of Lugh Aengus later he tricked his father out of his home at Brú na Böinne (Newgrange). Aengus was instructed to ask his father if he could live in the Brú for the ogus oidhche "(a) day and (a) night", which in Irish is ambiguous, and could refer to either "a day and a night" "day and night", which means for all time, and so Aengus took possession of Brú permanently. In The Wooing of Etaine, on the other hand, Aengus uses the same ploy to trick Elcmar out of Brú to Böinne, with Dagda's connivance.

Elatha and Bres: She told him that his father was Elatha, one of the Kings of the Fomorians; that he had come to her one time over a sea level in a great vessel that seemed to be of silver; that he himself had the appearance of a young man with yellow hair, his clothes decked with gold and five rings of gold around his neck. She had refused the love of all the young men of her own people, had given her her love and cried when she had left her.

Before he left, he had given her a ring from her own hand and she had to give it only to the man whose finger it would fit. Eri brought out the ring and put it on the finger of Bres and it fit him well. She and Bres and some of their followers then set out of the land of the Fomorians. At long last they came to that far country. Elatha the local King saw the ring on Bres' hand and asked him the whole story and said that Bres was his own son. Elatha then asked Bres what it was that led him out of his own country and his own kingdom. Bres answered truthfully: "Nothing drove me out but my own injustice and my own hardness; I took away their treasures from the people and their jewels and their food itself. And there were never taxes on them before I was their King. And still I'm here to look for fighting men that I can take Ireland by force. "








ELATHA







Elatha or Elada (modern spelling: Ealadha) was a prince of the Fomorians and the father of Bres by Ériu (Eri) of the Tuatha Dé Danann (Aos Sí, the Kopsida).

Elatha / Elada is also the sun, moon and the earth.

Elatha (Elada / Ellada) is quoted as "The beautiful Miltonic prince of darkness with golden hair".

Elatha (Elada) was the son of Dalbaech.

Elatha (Elada) was the father of the Dagda, Ogma, Delbaeth, and Elloth. 


Elloth was the father of Manannan mac Lir / Lir.

Elatha (Elada) was one of the Fomorians who took part in the Second Battle of Magh Tuireadh. 

During the Second Battle of Magh Tuireadh, Elatha, son of Dalbaech, watched Dagda's magic harp.

Elatha (Elada) is said to have a sense of humor and a sense of nobility.

The Battle of Magh Tuireadh (Cath Maige Tuired) means "The Battle of Magh Tuireadh," or the battle of Aos Si, Kopsidhu / Kopsida

The etymology of the word Elatha come from El + atha and Elada, El + ada.


  • Etymology 1. El, English, From Biblical Hebrew אֵל ('ēl). Proper noun, El.

  1. Any of several major ancient Near East deities, including the supreme god of the Canaanite religion, but especially the supreme Hebrew God.
  • Related terms: Eloah, Elohim.

  • Etymology 2. אֵל ('ēl). Hebrew, From Proto-Semitic * 'il-. Cognate with Akkadian 𒀭 (ilu), Arabic إله ('ilāh), Aramaic אלה (allah). Noun
  • אֵל (el) m (plural indefinite אלים, singular construct אל-, feminine counterpart אֵלָה)

  1. A god, supreme deity.
  • Proper noun אֵל • (el)

  1. God, the God of Israel.
  • The etymology of the word'alāh, Malay, from Arabic إله ('ilāh, 'god'), from Proto-Semitic *'il-. Noun, ilah (Jawi spelling اله, plural ilah-ilah, attributive form ilahnya).
  1. god (deity). Synonyms tuhan.
  • Etymology 2. ilah, Tambora, Noun, ilah.
  1. stone.
  • The etymology of the word alah, See also: Alah.
  • The etymology of the word Allah, Serbo-Croatian, Alternative forms Allah. From Arabic الله (allāh); ultimately from Proto-Semitic * 'il-. Proper noun, Allah m (Cyrillic spelling Allah).
  1. (Islam) Allah.
  • The etymology of the word Allah, Zazaki, Proper noun, Allah.
  1. (Islam) Allah.
  • See also, Car.
  • The etymology of the word Car, English, Proper noun, Car.
  1. The most widespread of the Nicobaré languages ​​spoken in the Nicobar Islands of India (ISO 839-3 "caq"). Synonyms, (language): Car Nicobarese

  • See also. Car language.
  • Etymology 2. Car, Polish, From car ("tsar").
  • The etymology of the word tsar, English, Borrowed from Russian tsar, from Old Gospel (cisar), from Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌹𐍃𐌰𐍂 (kaisar), from Byzantine Greek Kaisar (Kaîsar) ultimately from Latin Caesar. Doublet of kaiser.
  • Etymology 3. Car, Zazaki, Proper noun, Car

  1. God.
  • Etymology 4. Car. Car was the king of Megara and the son of Phoroneus (and Cerdo). His tomb was located on the road from Megara to Corinth. The Acropolis at Megara derived its name Caria (Karya) from King Car.

  • Etymology 2. AaIla, Indonesian, From Arabic الله (allāh); ultimately from Proto-Semitic * 'il-. Noun, Allah.

  • (Christianity) Elohim, God (See: Allah in the Indonesian translations of the Bible, "elohim" is translated into "allah" instead of "ilah" in contradiction with Indonesian Islamic terminology).

  1. "Akulah TUHAN (YHWH), Allah (your God), yang membawa angkau keluar dari tanah Mesir, dari tempat perbudakan." Exodus 20: 2 (TB 1974)
  2. "Kalau kamu mengakui bahwa Allah (your God) adalah TUHAN (YHWH), maka ikutilah Dia, namun kalau allahmu (your god) adalah Baal, ikutilah dia." 1 Kings 18:21 (AYT Draft). See also Tuhan.

  • The etymology of the word Tuhan, Indonesian, Proper noun Tuhan

  1. God (single god of monotheism (Islam) Allah
  2. (Christianity) YHWH, the Tetragrammaton.

  • The etymology of the word Allah, Turkish, See also tanrı.
  • The etymology of the word tanrı, Turkish, From Old Turkic 𐱅𐰭𐰼𐰃 (teŋri, "god of the blue sky"), from Proto-Turkic * teŋri or * taŋrɨ ("god; sky, heaven" controversial Altaic hypothesis, is possibly from Proto-Altaic * t`aŋgiri ("oath, God"). According to G. Starostin's interpretation this word is based on a common Altaic religious or juridical term. This proposed etymology assumes that 'sky' in Turkic has a secondary meaning being derived from the primary meaning 'God'. S. Georg suggested a loan in Turkic from Yeniseian * tɨŋgVr- 'high' (see Georg 2001).

  • The Old Turkic form is recorded by Mahmud al-Kashgari (11th century). The oldest form of the name is recorded in Chinese chronicles from the 4th century BC, describing the beliefs of the Xiongnu. It takes the form 撐 犁 / 撑 犁 (chēnglí), which is understood as a Chinese transcription of the Proto-Turkic form.
  • The further word is uncertain. Also compare Proto-Turkic * teŋiŕ ("lake, sea") and borrowing into Hungarian tenger; perhaps from the blue expanse.
  • Etymology 3. אֵל ('ēl) Judeo-Arabic, Noun אל ('illun)

  1. cinema.

  • The etymology of the word kin. English, From Middle English kin, kyn, ken, kun, from Old English cynn ("kind, sort, rank, quality, family, generation, offspring, pedigree, kin, race, people, gender, property, etiquette") , from Proto-Germanic * kunją ("race, generation, descent"), from Proto-Indo-European * Éenh1- ("to produce"). Cognate with Scots kinne ("gender, sex, race"), North Frisian kinn, kenn (gender, race, family, kinship), Dutch kunne family, lineage "), Danish kyn (" gender, sex "), Swedish kön (" gender, sex "), ancestry, birth ", Ancient Greek genus (génos," kind, race "), Albanian dhen (" (herd of) small cattle "). Noun kin (numbered and uncountable, plurals)

  1. Race; family; breed; kind.
  2. (collectively) Persons of the same race or family; kindred.
  3. One or more relatives, such as siblings or cousins, taken collectively.
  4. Relationship; same-bloodedness or affinity; near connection or alliance, as of those with common descent.
  5. Kind; sort; way; way.
  • See also: kith, clan.
  • Etymology 4. El, from Cornish, Noun, el m (plural eledh) 1st angel. Dalmatian, from Latin ille, illud. Galician, From Latin ille ("that"). Compare Portuguese, Spanish él. Pronoun, el nominative and oblique (dative lle, accusative) 1. he. Related terms ela, elas, eles. Occitan, From Old Provençal, from Latin ille. Pronoun, Venetian, Pronoun, el.
  • The etymology of the word elas. Elas, Hellas, Elada, Ellada (Greece).

  • The etymology of ele, Old French, From Latin illa.
  • The Etymology of the word Leu, Tetum, Noun, Bee (Queen Bee / Aphrodite / Isis / Brigid). Galician, Verb, Third-person singular (he, ela) indicative of ler. Ler (meaning "Sea" in Old Irish; Lir is the genitive form) is a sea god in Ireland.
  • The etymology illa, Catalan, Noun, island (Tiree / Ethica / Ithaka / Leukata / Lefkada / Atlantis / Tir nóg).
  • Etymology 2. illa, Quechua, illa, Noun 1. lightning, ray 2. gem, jew-el, hidden treasure 3. a sacred tree (cops) or rock (Leukata) struck by lightning.
  • Etymology 2. ele, Volapük Article ele, the dative singular of el (ie, Elatha / Elada). Examples, Cyb-ele, S-ele-ne. Irish, atha, Noun, atha f (genitive singular atha) 1. space of time. Irish mutation, with h-prothesis, hatha (Hathor). el 1. he (third-person singular subject pronoun) 2. it (it is used as an obligatory pronoun after a verb. Turkish, Noun, el (defined accusative eli, plural eller) 1. country, homeland, province.
  • Etymology 5th, Aromanian, See also, io

  • Etymology 6. el, Catalan. From the earlier ill, from Latin illum, from Latin ille.
  • The etymology of the word Io, Tok Pisin, From English law. Noun lo

  1. law.
  • Etymology 2. Io, Zulu, Pronoun, lo

  1. Combining stem of lona.

  • Iona (Scottish Gaelic: Ì Chaluim Chille) is a small island in the Inner Hebrides off the Ross of Mull on the west coast of Scotland.
  • The earliest forms of the name-enabled William J. Watson-name scholar show that the name originally meant something like "yew-place". The element Ivo, denoting "yew", occurs in Ogham inscriptions (Iva-cattos [genitive], Iva-genitive and Gaulish names and may form the basis of early Gaelic names like Eogan (ogham: Ivo-genos). It is possible that the name is related to the mythological figure, Ferdinand Eogabail, foster-son of Manannan (Mananad mac Lir), the forename meaning "man of the yew."
  • Murray (1966) claims that the "ancient" Gaelic name was Innis nan Druinich ("the isle of Druidic hermits").
  • In the early Historic Period Iona lay within the Gaelic Kingdom of Dal Riata, in the region controlled by Cenel Loairn (ie Lorn, as it was then).
  • Next to Riata or Dalíada was a Gaelic overking that included parts of western Scotland and northeastern Ireland on each side of the North Channel.
  • In early times people lived in settlements such as Kilmartin, and many of the islands, such as Islay and Tiree (Ethica / Ithaca).


The etymology of the word el .


  • Etymology 7. el, Cornish, Noun, el m (plural eledh).
  1. angel.
  • The etymology of the word angel, From English angel, angel, angel, angel, Anglo-Norman angele, angel, angel, angel, angel but ultimately from Latin angelus, from Ancient Greek angel (ángelos, "messenger"). The religious sense of the Greek word first appeared in the Septuagint as a translation of the Hebrew word מַלְאָךְ (mal'āḵ, "messenger") or יהוה מַלְאָךְ ("YHWH" messenger of YHWH). Cognate with Scots angel, Saterland Frisian Engel, Engel Engel, Angel Engel Engel Angel "), Swedish ängel (" angel "), Icelandic engill (" angel "), Gothic 𐌰𐌲𐌲𐌹𐌻𐌿𐍃 (aggilus," angel, messenger ").

  • Etymology 8. el, Crimean Tatar, Noun, el

  1. hand, forearm.
  • Etymology 9. el, Danish, Noun, el c (singularly defined ellen, plural indefinite elle).

  1. alder.
  • (Altitude), altitude, alusō, alusō (altitude), altitude (altitude), altitude (alanza (n)), Latin alnus, Latvian alksnis, Polish olcha, Albanian halo ("black pine"), ), Ancient Macedonian (Hesychius), ali (plural alders)

  1. Any of several trees or shrubs of the Alnus family, belonging to the birch family.
  • Etymology 2nd alder, Norwegian Bokmål, From Old Norse aldr, from Proto-Germanic * aldrą. Akin to ale ("to raise"), from ala.
  • The etymology of the word ala, Chickasaw, Verb, ala

  1. to be born.
  • Etymology 2nd ala, Hoyahoya, Noun, ala

  1. grandfather.
  • Etymology 3. ala, Icelandic, From Old Norse ala, from Proto-Germanic * alaną ("to nourish, grow"), from Proto-Indo-European * al- ("grow"). Verb, ala (strong verb, third person singular past indicative, third person plural past indicative, supine alið)

  1. (with accusative) to bear, give birth to
  2. (with accusative) to foster
  3. (with accusative) to feed, nourish.
  • Etymology 4. ala, Jarai, From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian * hulaR, from Proto-Austronesian * SulaR
  • Noun (classifier drói) ala

  1. snake.
  • Etymology 5. ala, Noun, ala f

  1. flag (piece of cloth).
  • Etymology 6. ala, The usual theory is to be borrowed from Middle Low German hol ("depth, hole, cave"), or perhaps from the same form in Middle Dutch or German Low German (East Frisian); cf. German Höhle ("cave").
  • Etymology 7. ala, Noun ala f (4th declension)

  1. cave (space or cavity formed underground, especially between rocks or in the face of a cliff or hillside)
  2. (dwelling of some animals, in the form of a cavity with one or many exits).
  • Etymology 8. ala, Malagasy, Noun, ala

  1. forest (copse).
  • Etymology 9. ala, Serbo-Croatian, Noun, ala f (Cyrillic spelling).

  1. dragon.
  • Etymology 3. alder, Norwegian Nynorsk, Noun, alder m (defined singular alderen, indefinite plural aldrar, defined plural aldrane)

  1. age
  • Etymology 4. alder, Old Swedish, From Old Norse all, from Proto-Germanic * allaz. Adjective, alder

  1. all
  2. whole, complete.
  • Etymology 5. alder, Old Swedish, Noun, alder m

  1. lifetime
  2. age; how old one or something is
  3. age, era
  4. old age.
  • Etymology 10. el, Danish, Noun, el c (singularly defined ellen, not used in plural form).

  1. electricity.
  • The etymology of the word electricity, Noun

  • electricity (usually uncountable, plural electricities)

  • Originally a property of amber and some other nonconducting substances to attract lightweight material when rubbed or the cause of this property; now understood to be a phenomenon caused by the distribution and movement of charged subatomic particles and their interaction with the electromagnetic field. See also, alternating current (AC).
  • Etymology 11. el, Esperanto, Obscure; may be derived from Latin ex ("out of").
  • The etymology of the word ex, English, Noun, ex (exes)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter X / x.

  • The etymology of the word X, English, Adjective, X (not comparable)

  1. Intersex or non-binary.
  • The etymology of the word intersex, Noun, intersex (plural intersexes)

  1. Any of a variety of conditions (in a dioecious species) whereby an individual has male and female sex characteristics; the state of having the physical features of both sexes; intersexuality.
  • Usage notes: Since the turn of the millennium (2000), the adjective intersex and noun phrase intersex person have been preferred to hermaphroditic and hermaphrodite as being more appropriate when the referent is human. The intersex noun has also become more common than intersexuality.
  • Synonyms

  1. intersexed
  2. intersexual
  3. (sometimes offensive): hermaphroditic, hermaphrodite
  4. (clinical, sometimes offensive): pseudohermaphroditic, pseudohermaphrodite
  5. (on forms and documents): indeterminate, X
  • Etymology 2. X, English, From Christ by abbreviation, from Ancient Greek X (Kh, "(letter chi)"), from Christ (Khristós, "Christ"). Proper noun, X

  1. (informal) Christ.
  • Derived terms
  1. Xianity. Abbreviation of Christianity.
  2. Xmas. Abbreviation of Christmas.
  • Etymology 3. X, In Plato's Timaeus, it is explained that the two bands that form the "world soul" (anima mundi) cross each other like the letter Xi, possibly referring to the ecliptic crossing the celestial equator. The celestial equator is the great circle of the imaginary celestial sphere on the same plane as the equator of Earth. Justin Martyr in the 2nd century makes explicit reference to Plato's image in Timaeus in terms of a prefiguration of the Holy Cross. and an early testimony may be the phrase in Didache, "sign of extension in heaven" (sēmeion epektaseōs en ouranōi).


The Atlantis Cross design is based on Plato's description of the layout of the streets of Basel, the Atlantean Capitol city, in Timaeus and Criteas.


Atlantis "Island of Atlas") is an island mentioned in Plato's works by Timaeus and Critias.


According to Plato, the first king of Atlantis was also named Atlas, the son of Poseidon.


Poseidon was one of the Twelve Olympians in the ancient Greek religion.


He was god of the sea and other waters; of earthquakes; and of horses.

  • Etymology 4. X, From cross, due to the X symbol being a cross saltire.
  • The saltire, also called Saint Andrew's Cross or the crux decussata, is a heraldic symbol in the form of a diagonal cross, like the shape of the letter X in Roman.
  • The etymology of the word cross, Alternative forms of Cross (sometimes for the historical cross of Christ).
  • Etymology 2. Cross, English, From Middle English cross, cros, from Old English cros ("rood, cross"), from Old Norse kross (perhaps from Old Irish Cross) from Latin crux. Cognate with Icelandic kross ("cross"), Faroese krossur ("cross"), Danish kors ("cross"), Swedish kors ("cross"). Displaced native Middle English rood ("rood, cross"), from Old English ród ("cross, rood, crucifix, field"); see rood. The sense of "two intersecting lines drawn or cut on a surface, two lines intersecting at right angles" without regard to religious significance develops from the late 14th century.
  • The etymology of the word rood, English, From Middle English rode, rood ("cross, rood"), from Old English ród ("a rod, field, , rood (as in Holy-rood), gallows, and cross on which a person is executed, from a Proto-Germanic * rōdō, * ródme ("rod, field" Indo-European * rōt-, * reh½t- ("bar, beam, stem"). Cognate with German Rute ("rod, cane, field"), Norwegian roda ("gender"). Largely displaced by cross. More at the rod.
  • The etymology of the word Holyrood, English, English, holy + rood. Proper noun Holyrood
  1. (Christianity) A relic believed to be part of the True Cross.
  2. An area of ​​Edinburgh, the home of the Scottish Parliament.
  3. (by extension, by metonymy) The Scottish Parliament.

Holyrood Palace. The Palace of Holyroodhouse, commonly referred to as Holyrood Palace, is the official residence of the British monarch in Scotland, Queen Elizabeth II. Situated in the heart of Edinburgh's Royal Mile, Edinburgh Castle is a 5-minute walk from Edinburgh Castle. It features a rooftop pool and a 24-hour front desk.


Etymology 5. X, Derived terms:

  1. X marks the spot
  2. XXX
  • Etymology 6. X, Korean, From Japanese × (batsu). Derived terms

  1. OX
  • The etymology of the word OX, From Middle English oxe, from Old English oxa, from Proto-Germanic * uhsô (compare West Frisian okse, Dutch os, German Ochse), from Proto-Indo-European * uksḗn. Cognate with Welsh ych ("ox"), Tocharian A ops, Tocharian B okso ("draft-ox"), Avestan (uxshan, "bull"), Sanskrit उक्षन् (ukṣán). Noun ox (oxen).

  1. An adult castrated male of cattle (B. taurus).
  2. Any bovine animal (Bos genus).
  • The etymology of the word ops, Latin, From Proto-Indo-European * h3ep- (i) -, * h3op- (i) - (force, ability), from * h3ep- base, whence Sanskrit अप्नस् , "Property, possession") and possibly Ancient Greek ibins (ómpnē, "food"). Related to omnis, optimus and opus.

  • Derived terms copis, cops. cópia.
  • The etymology of the word copis, Latin, Borrowed from Ancient Greek, kopis, koptō, "I cut". Noun copis f (genitive copidis); third declension

  1. A short sword.
  • The etymology of the word Copia, Italian, From Latin cópia ("abundance"). Derived terms

  1. cōpiōsus
  2. cornūcōpia.
  • The etymology of the word cornūcōpia, From Latin cornūcōpia ("horn of plenty"), from cornū ("horn") + cōpia ("abundance").

  1. (Greek mythology) A goat's horn endlessly overflowing with fruit, flowers and grain; or full of whatever its owner wanted.
  2. A hollow horn- or cone-shaped object, filled with edible or useful things.
  3. An abundance or abundant supply.
  • Etymology 2nd ops, In ancient Roman religion, Ops or Opis (Latin: "Plenty") was a fertility deity and earth goddess of Sabine origin. In Ops' statues and coins, she is figured sitting, as Chthonian deities normally are, and generally, hold a scepter or a corn spray and cornucopia.
  • Etymology 3rd ops, Hellenic, Ancient Greek, Pronunciation, IPA: / ops / → / ops / → / ops /. From Proto-Hellenic * wókʷs, from Proto-Indo-European * wṓkʷs. Related to epos and epi. Cognates includes Latin vōx, Sanskrit वाच् (vāc), and Tocharian A wak. Noun óψ • (óps) f (genitive); third declension

  1. (poetic) voice
  2. (poetic) word.
  • Etymology 2. From Proto-Hellenic * óps, from Proto-Indo-European * h3ókʷs. See also ὤψ (ṓps). Noun, f (f) f (genitive f); third declension (rare)

  1. eye, face.

  • Etymology 2nd ex, Middle English, Noun, ex

  1. Alternative form of ax ("axis").
  • Etymology 12. Portuguese, Akin to Spanish el. Article, el m sg

  1. Only used in el-rei:.
  • The etymology of the word el-rei, Portuguese, from Old Portuguese el rei, which corresponds to el ("the") + rei ("king").
  • Etymology 13. el, Westrobothnian, Noun, el m (defined singular eln)

  1. threads.
  • Alternative forms: il.

  • The etymology of the word il, Icelandic, Noun, il f (singular iljar genitive, nominative plural iljar).

  1. the sole of the foot.
  • The etymology of the word sole, Homophones: Seoul, soul, sowl.
  • The etymology of the word soul, English, From Middle English Soul, Sowle, Saule, sawle, from Old English sāwol ("soul, life, spirit, being"), from Proto-Germanic * saiwalō. Cognate with Scots saul, soul (soul), North Frisian siel, soul (soul), Saterland Frisian Seele (soul) Seele ("soul") Scandinavian homonyms seem to have been borrowed from Old Saxon * siala. Modern Danish sjæl, Swedish själ, Norwegian sjel. Icelandic Hall may have come from Old English sāwol.
  • Etymology 2nd sole, From earlier sow ("to pull by the ear"). Origin unknown. Perhaps from sow ("female pig") + -le, as in the phrase "take a sow by the wrong ear", or from Middle English sole ("rope"). See above.

  • Etymology 3rd sole, French, From Vulgar Latin * sola, from Latin solea. Noun, sole f (soles)

  1. sole (fish).
  • Etymology 4th sole, Interlingue, Noun, sole

  1. sun ..
  • Etymology 5th sole, Italian, From Latin sōlem, accusative case of sōl, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European * sóh2wl̥. Cognates include Greek sun, Icelandic sól, Hindi सूर्य (sūrya), and Russian solt (sólnce). Noun, salt m (salt)

  1. Sun (star the Earth revolves around sunlight
  2. (poetic) daytime, day (the interval between sunrise and sunset)
  3. (poetic) year.
  4. (poetic, in the plural) eyes.






The etymology of the word "a" used to form the word Elada, El + a + da.

  • Etymology 1. a, from Abaum Noun, House. House, This dwell within one of the twelve astrological houses. Synonyms accommodate, harbor / harbor, guest.
  • Etymology 2. a, from Ama, Noun, Tree.
  • Etymology 3. a, from Chuukese, pronoun, he, she, it.
  • Etymology 4. a, from Danish, preposition, of, each, each containing.
  • Etymology 5. a, from Dutch, Noun, and stream or water.
  • Etymology 6th, From Latin annus, Latin, Noun 1. Year. In Ancient Rome, the word annus originally meant "ten months" which was the duration of the Roman year (from the month martius to December 304 days, with the remaining two months of winter not assigned to a specific month). It later came to mean "twelve months" as the calendar was rearranged by Julius Caesar and the month of July named after him.
  • Etymology 7th, used to form the word el + a + da, From Middle English and from Old English to "one; a; lone; sole" / soul. The "n" was gradually lost before consonants in almost all dialects by the 15th century.
  • Etymology 8. a, Abau, Noun, 1st house.
  • Etymology 9. a, Ama, Noun 1st tree.
  • Etymology 10. a, Egyptian, Romanization and 1. Manuel de Codage transliteration of ˤ.
  • The etymology of the word ˤ, 1. arm, hand 2. deed, record 3. wooden staff (copse / a-ra-vani) 4. dyke.
  • Etymology 11th, Galician, Derived terms, ao, aos. The Aos Si, the older form of the settlement, aos network means "people of the mounds" (the mounds are known in the Irish as "the sidhu") (People of the Goddess Danu ") (Bodb of the Mound on Femen).
  • Etymology 12th, From Old Portuguese, from Latin illa.
  • Etymology 13. a, is from Krisa, Noun 1. pig.
  • Etymology 14th, Old Danish, Noun 1. (Scanian) stream, river. Descendants Danish: på (Pa / Ra) head-kick.
  • Etymology 15th, Preposition 1. out of. Old Irish, Descendants, Manx: ass.
  • Etymology 16th, Portuguese, From Portuguese a, form of A, from Etruscan, from Ancient Greek A (A, "alpha"), from Phoenician ("aleph"), from Egyptian. In the sense of at ("during the specified period"), it can be used with:
  1. night ("night").
  2. noitinha ("evening").
  3. tarde ("afternoon").
  4. meio-dia ("noon").
  5. meia-noite ("midnight").
  6. specific hours.

  • The word aleph is derived from the West Semitic word for "ox." An ox (plural oxen), also known as a bullock in Australia and India, is a bovine trained as a draft animal. Oxen has commonly castrated adult male cattle. The aleph is the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet and has the number value 1. The aleph represents God in the alphabet and in the counterfeit bible. The aleph and Elohim, ie Elada / Elatha.

The etymology of the word atha used to for the word Elatha, El + atha.

  • Etymology 1st ath, Irish, From Old Irish athad. Noun, atha f (genitive singular atha).
  1. space of time.
  • Etymology 2. atha, Noun, atha f (genitive singular atha).
  1. Alternative form of aife ("ebb; decline, decay; reflux").
  • The etymology of the word aife, From Old Irish aithbe n ("ebb, reflux (of sea)").
  • Etymology 2. atha, Irish mutation, with h-prothesis, hatha, Homophones Hathor.
  • Hathor was a major goddess in ancient Egyptian religion who played a wide variety of roles. As a sky deity, she was the mother or consort of the sky god Horus and the sun god Ra, both of whom were connected with the kingdom, and thus she was the symbolic mother of their earthly counterparts, the pharaohs. She was one of several goddesses who acted as the Eye of Ra, Ra's feminine counterpart, and in this form she had a vengeful aspect that protected him from his enemies. Her contrasting, beneficial side represented music, dance, joy, love, sexuality, and maternal care, and she acted as the consort of several male deities and the mother of their sons. These two sides of the goddess exemplified the Egyptian concept of femininity. Hathor also crossed the boundaries between the worlds, helping deceased souls in the transition to the afterlife.

Hathor was associated with turquoise, malachite, gold and copper.  

Hathor was originally a personification of the Milky Way, which was considered to be the milk that flowed from the udders of a heavenly cow (linking her with Nut, Bat and Mehet-Weret).

As time passed, she absorbed the attributes of many other goddesses but also became more closely associated with Isis.

She was a sky goddess, known as "Lady of Stars" and "Sovereign of Stars" and connected to Sirius (and so the goddesses Sopdet).

As the "Mistress of Heaven," she was associated with Nut, Mut and the Queen.

The etymology of the word ada used to form the word El + ada.


  • Etymology 1st order, Azerbaijani, From Proto-Turkic * ātag ("island"). Cognate with Crimean Tatar ada, Turkish ada. Noun, ada (defined deep accusative, plural adalar).
  1. island.
  • Etymology 2 nd, Crimean Gothic, From Proto-Germanic * ajją, from Proto-Indo-European * h2ōwyóm. Noun, ada
  1. egg.
  • Etymology 3rd ad, Esperanto, -ad- ("continued action") + -a ("adjective")
  • Adjectives, ada (singular accusative adan, plural adaj, accusative plural adajn).
  1. continuously.
  • Etymology 4th, Hiligaynon, From Spanish hada. Noun, idol
  1. fairy.

A fairy is a type of mythical being or a legendary creature in European folklore, and a form of spirit, often described as metaphysical, supernatural, or supernatural.

The Tuath (a) De Danann being the race of supernaturally-gifted people who are referred to as fairies, though in more ancient times they were regarded as goddesses and gods.

The aos is the Irish term for the supernatural race in Irish and Scottish, comparable to the fairies or elves.

  • Etymology 5th, Indonesian, Verb, ada
  1. to be (exist).
  • Etymology 6th, Northern Paiute, Noun, ada
  1. crow.
  • Etymology 7th, Swahili, From Arabic أداء ('adā', "payment").
  • Noun, ada (n class, plural ada)
  1. fee.

The etymology of the word da used to form the word Elada, Ela + da.

  • Etymology 1. da, Translingual, Symbol, yes
  1. (metrology) Symbol for the prefix deca-, indicating multiplication by 10.
  • Decimal number system. Decimal number system, also called Hindu-Arabic, or Arabic, number system, in mathematics, positional numeral system employing 10 as the base and requiring 10 different numerals, the digits 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 , 8, 9. It also requires a decimal point to represent decimal fractions.
  • Etymology 2. da, Danish language (ISO 639-1 alpha-2 code DA).
  • Etymology 3. yes, English, From child language; compare dad and dada.
  • Noun, da (plural das)
  1. (Ireland, Scotland, Northern England) Father.
  2. Synonyms: pa, Pa.

The original Semitic letter may have been inspired by an Egyptian hieroglyph for tp, "head", ie kick. It was used for / r / by Semites because in their language, the word for "head" was réš (also the name of the letter). It was developed into Greek 'Ρ' ῥῶ (rhô) and Latin R. Pa is the Greek word for Ra the Egyptian sun god.

  • The etymology of the word res, English, (role-playing games), short form of resurrection.
  • Etymology 2nd res, Catalan, Noun, res
  1. plural of re.
  • The etymology of the word re, Albanian, Noun, re f (indefinite plural re, definite singular reja).
  1. cloud.
  • Etymology 2. re, Breton, Noun, re m (plural reo)
  • pair (of eyes, etc.)
  • couple.
  • The etymology of the word reja, re + ja.
  • The etymology of the word re used for the word re + ja, Ra (or Ancient Egyptian: rꜥ or rˤ; also transliterated rˤw; cuneiform: 𒊑𒀀 𒊑𒀀 or 𒊑𒅀 ri) or Re (/ reɪ /; Coptic: ⲣⲏ, Rē) is the ancient Egyptian deity of the sun.
  • The etymology of the word I used to form the word re + ja, Ya. Ya, Jah or Yah (Hebrew: יהּ, Yah) is a short form of Yahweh (in consonantal spelling YHWH Hebrew: יהוה, called the Tetragrammaton), the name of God in the Semitic Bible. This short form of the name occurs 50 times in the text of the Hebrew Bible, of which 24 forms part of the phrase "Hallelujah".
  • The etymology of the word Yah, Yah (Egyptian: jˁḥ, Coptic ⲟⲟ ϩ) is a lunar deity in ancient Egyptian religion. The word jˁḥ simply means "moon". It is also transliterated as Yah, Jah, Jah (w), Joh or Aah.
  • Etymology 3rd Re, Friulian, From Latin rēx, rēgem. Compare Italian re. Noun, re m (plural rês).
  1. king.
  • Etymology 4. re, Wandamen, Noun, re
  1. eye.
  • Etymology 3rd res, Galician, Noun, res f (plural reses)
  1. head of quadrupedal cattle.
  • Noun, res m pl, plural of re.
  • Etymology 4. res, Latin, From Proto-Italic * reis, from Proto-Indo-European * rehs ("wealth, goods"). Cognate to Old Persian [script needed] (rāy-, "paradise, wealth"), Avestan (rāy-, "paradise, wealth") and Sanskrit रयि (rayí, "property, goods"). Noun, rēs f (genitive reī); fifth declension
  1. thing, matter, issue, affair, stuff.
  2. state, republic, commonwealth.
  3. deed.
  • Etymology of the word deed, English, (law) A legal contract showing a bond in the form of a document.
  • Etymology 5. res, Spanish, Noun, res f (reses)
  1. head of quadrupedal cattle or game
  2. (Latin America) cattle.
  • Etymology 6. res, Westrobothnian, cf Old Norse hreistr, Norwegian reist
  • Noun, res n, m
  1. guts; offal, scales of fish.
  • Etymology 7. Catalan, Noun, rés m (resos)
  1. (religion) the act of prayer.
  • The etymology of the word das, Aromanian, From Greek forest (dásos). Noun, das n
  1. forest, woods (ie, copsedas).
  • Etymology 2. das, Danish, borrowed from German das, and euphemistic contraction of das Haus ("the house").
  • Etymology 4. yes, Aiwoo, Verb, yes
  1. to swim, drift, float.
  • Etymology 5. yes, Bambara, Noun, yes
  1. (anatomy) mouth.
  • Etymology 6. yes, Cebuano, Initial clipping of ada.
  • Etymology 7. yes, Preposition, yes
  1. from
  2. of
  • Etymology 8. yes, Ewe, Noun, yes
  1. bow
  2. mother
  3. snake.
  • Etymology 9. da, German, From a Middle High German dār, dā ("then; at that time"), from Old High German dār, dā, from Old High German dō. Synonyms (then): also; dann (ie, dan, dan).
  • Etymology 10. yes, Grass Koiari, Pronoun, yes
  1. I (i)
  • The etymololgy of the word i, American Sign Language
  • Letter, the little finger. Idas (little finger). The little finger was the brother of Heracles who was called by others the altar of Ake-sidas. The word Ake is derived from Latin from ancient Hellenic acacia (akakia / acacia). It was the name used by Theophrastus and Dioscorides to denote thorn trees (the cops / cops / Kopsidas), the acacia tree. The word root is akis (aki / akis) or akis (akḗ). (for an etymology of the word i see above).
  • Etymology 11. Kirikiri, Noun da
  1. water.
  • Etymology 12. da, Norwegian Bokmål, From Old Norse þá and þó (adverb); and Old Norse èé er (when, conjunction), and German da (because, conjunction) Derived terms datid.
  • The etymology of the word datid, Norwegian Nynorsk, From da + tid, Noun datid f (definite singular datida, indefinite plural datider, defined plural datidene) (genitive definite singular datidas)
  1. of the time, at that time.
  • Etymology 13. da, Ojibwe, Particle da Related terms
  1. daga (ie, daga + da / dagada / Dagda.
  • The etymology of the word daga, Hiligaynon, Noun, dag
  1. clay, clay soil.
  2. sacrifice, specifically human sacrifice.
  • Etymology 2. daga, Ilocano, Noun, daga
  1. soil, earth
  2. world.
  • Etymology 3. daga, Italian, Possibly through a Celtic source from Vulgar Latin * if used to refer to knives from the Roman province of Dacia. Noun, daga f (plural daghe).
  1. dagger.
  2. (weapon) A stabbing weapon, similar to a sword but with a short, double-edged blade.
  • Etymology 4. daga, Old Norse, Verb, daga
  1. (impersonal) to dawn (become day).
  • Derived terms, dagan f ("dawn, daybreak")
  • Related terms, dagr ("day")
  • Etymology 14. da, Vanimo, Noun, da
  1. pig.
  • Etymology 15. da, Welsh, From Proto-Celtic * dagos ("good") (compare Irish dea-). Adjectives, yes (female singular da, plural da, equative cystal, comparative gwell, superlative gorau).
  1. good, well.
  • Noun, da m (uncountable)
  1. goodness
  2. (collective noun) goods, cattle.
  • The etymology of the word well, English, Alternative forms wall.
  • Etymology 2. Well, From Middle English well, from Old English wielle ("well"), from Proto-Germanic * wallijmun ("well, swirl, wave"), from Proto-Indo-European * wel-; wind; roll "). Cognate with the West Frisian wel, the German Welle ("well"), the German Welle ("well"), the Danish væld ("well; spring" "Well"), Icelandic vella ("boiling; bubbling; eruption").
  • Etymology 3. well, From Middle English w, wol, wol, wele, from Old English wel, wæl, well ("well, abundantly, very, very, * wela, * wala ("well", literally "as wished, as desired"), from Proto-Indo-European * welh- ("wish, desire"). Cognate with Scots wele, weil (well), North Frisian wel, weil, wal ("well"), lowland wol ("well" , German wol, wohl ("well"), Norwegian and Danish vel ("well"), Swedish väl ("well"), Icelandic vel, val ("well"). Related to will.
  • Etymology 16. da, Western Sisaala, Noun, da.
  1. stick.
  • Etymology 4. well.
  1. and the shaft sinks into the ground to obtain water, oil, or gas.
  2. synonyms: borehole, spring, waterhole, bore, shaft.
  3. and a water spring or fountain.
  4. to place where there are mineral springs.
  • Etymology 17. da, Zhuang, From Proto-Tai * p.taːᴬ ("eye"). Cognate with Thai ตา (dtaa), Northern Thai, Lao ຕາ (tā), Lü ᦎᦱ (ṫaa), Tai Dam, Shan တႃ (tǎa), Ahom or taa, Bouyei dal, (OC * taːʔ, "to see"). Noun da (old orthography da)
  1. eye.
  • Etymology 18. da, "earth" (da), Doric for γ (gē / earth).





BALOR


The Fomorians have a supernatural race. 

They are hostile beings who come from the sea.

Later, the Fomorians were portrayed as giants and sea peoples. 

The Fomorians are the sea peoples.

The Fomorians are enemies and opponents of Tuatha Dé Danann, Aos Sí, Kopsida, the Druids-Druidas.

The Fomorians are the gods who represent the harmful or destructive powers of nature.

They are personifications of chaos, darkness, death, blight, and drought. 

The Tuath De, Kopsidas in contrast, are the gods of growth and civilization. 

The relationship between the Fomorians and the Tuatha Dé Danann, Aos Sí, Kop's residence / Kopsida, is complicated because some of their members intermarried and had children making it very difficult to tell us apart.

The characteristics of the Fomorians have the body of a man and the head of a goat.

Balor (Khonsu / Yah) was the king of the Fomorians, a group of supernatural beings.

Balor is often described as a giant with a large eye in his forehead that wreaks destruction when opened. 

The etymology of the word Balor comes from Ba + lor and Bar + lore.

  • Etymology 1. Ba, English, From Egyptian (bA) Noun ba (plural bass) 1. In ancient Egyptian mythology, a being's soul or personality.
  • Etymology 2. Ba, Bakung, Noun ba water (clear liquid H 2 O). Borôro, Noun ba 1. egg.
  • Etymology 3. Ba, from Irish, Noun ba f 1. plural of bó, Tá na ba moha - The cows are in the field.
  • The etymology of the word bó, Noun bó f (genitive singular bó, nominative plural ba) 1. cow.
  • Etymology 4. Ba, from Kurdish, Noun ba m 1. wind. Old Irish, Verb ba 1. first-person singular present subjunctive of is 2. second-person singular present subjunctive of is 3. third person singular present subjunctive of is 4. second-person singular imperative of is 5. third-person singular preterite and imperfect indicative of is 6. third-person singular prefix and imperfect indicative of is.
  • Etymology 5. Ba is from Vietnamese, Noun, and 1. (mainly Southern Vietnam) father. Vietnamese Etymology 2 Numeral ba 1. (cardinal) three. Adjective ba 1. (Southern Vietnam, ordinal, of a sibling) secondborn. 1. anh / ch'i ba - second eldest brother / sister 2. bac ba - second eldest brother / sister of one's parent 3. chu ba - secondborn younger brother of one's father. Derived terms, tháng ba ("March"), thú ba ("third; Tuesday"). See also there.
  • The Etymology of the word there, from Vietnamese, there. Sino-Vietnamese, from 三 ("three") Numeral, there, 1. (cardinal, Sino-Vietnamese) three. 2. (ordinal) third; thirdly.
  • The etymology of the word Bar, from English, from the Middle English barre, from Old French barre, from Vulgar Latin * barra, of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Old Frankish * bara ("bar, beam, barrier, fence"), from Proto-Germanic * barō, from Proto-Indo-European * bʰAr- (" board, board "). If so, then cognate with Old High German para, bara ("bar, beam, one's cherished land"), Old Frisian ber ("attack, assault"), Swedish bärling (For example, a bar in a vehicle, a rod), the Latin forus ("gangway, plank"), the Russian (bourgeois, fencing, paling, fence) of land, furrow, marker, beacon, lighthouse "). May well have been reinforced by the existing Old English term from the same root.
  • Etymology 2. Bar, Noun, bar (countless and uncountable, plural bars). 1. A solid, more or less rigid object of metal or wood with a uniform cross section smaller than its length. 2. (countable, uncountable, metalurgy) A solid metal object with uniform (round, hexagonal, octagonal or rectangular) cross-section; in its US its smallest dimension is .25 inches or more, a piece of thinner material being called a strip. Ancient Sparta used iron bars instead of handy coins in more valuable alloy, to physically discourage the use of money.
  • Etymology 3. Bar, (law, "the Bar", "the bar") The Bar exam, the legal licensing exam. (law, "the Bar", "the bar") Bar, A collective term for lawyers or the legal profession; specifically applied to barristers in some countries but including all lawyers in others. Call to the bar.
  • Etymology 4. Bar, The call to the bar is a legal term of art in most common law jurisdictions where persons must be qualified to be allowed to argue in court on behalf of another party and are then said to have been " bar "or have received a" call to the bar ". The "bar" is now used as a collective noun for barristers, but literally referred to the wooden barrier in the old courtrooms, which separated the often crowded public area from the courtyard reserved for those who have business with the Court. The barristers would sit or stand immediately behind it, facing the judge, and could use it as a table for their briefs.
  • Etymology 5. Bar, (music) A vertical line across a musical staff dividing written music into sections, typically of equal durational value. (sports) A horizontal field that must be crossed in a high jump and pole vault. (backgammon) The central divider between the backboard and the backgammon board, where stones are placed if they are hit. An addition to a military medal, on the basis of a subsequent act. A linear shoaling landform feature within a body of water. (heraldry) One of the ordinaries in heraldry; and fess. A city gate, in some British place names. (architecture) A gatehouse of a castle or fortified town. (farriery) The part of the crust of a horse's hoof which is bent inwards towards the frog at the heel on each side and extends into the center of the sole.
  • Etymology 6. Bar, from Afar, Noun bar 1. night. French, Noun, bar m (plural bars) 1. A bass (fish). Romani, bar m (plural bar) 1. stone.
  • The etymology of their word used to form the word Ba + lor is Aromanian, From Latin illōrum ("of those"), genitive plural of ille, ilud. Compare theirs.
  • The etymology of the word ele, is Old French, From Latin illa.
  • The Etymology of the word Leu, Tetum, Noun, Bee (Queen Bee / Aphrodite / Isis / Brigid / Danu). Galician, Verb, Third-person singular (he, ela) indicative of ler. Ler (meaning "Sea" in Old Irish; Lir is the genitive form) is a sea god in Ireland.
  • The etymology of the word illa, from Catalan, Noun, island (Tir nóg / Ireland / Ithaka / Leukata / Lefkada).
  • Etymology 2. illa, from Quechua, illa, Noun 1. lightning, ray 2. gem, jew-el, hidden treasure 3. a sacred tree (rock / kick) or rock struck by lightning .
  • Etymology 2. Ele, from Volapük Articles, Elatha / Elada.
  • The etymology of the word lore, a body of traditions and knowledge on a subject or held by a particular group, typically passed from person to person by word of mouth.



LER

Ler (meaning "Sea" in Old Irish; Lir is the genitive form) is a sea god.

Ler is named Allod in early genealogies and corresponds to the Llŷr of Welsh mythology.

The etymology of the word Allod, allod, Noun, allod (plural allods).

  1. allodium.
  • The etymology of the word allodium, from the Medieval Latin allodium, from the Frankish * allaud ("allodium, patrimony"), from Proto-Germanic * alaudą ("allodium, transferable possessions" allaz ("all") + * audaz ("goods"). Cognate with Old High German ōt ("property"), Old Saxon ōd ("estate, wealth"), Old English ēad ("possessions").
  • Noun, allodium plural allodia

  1. freehold land or property.

Allodial title is ownership of real estate (land, buildings, and fixtures) that is independent of any superior landlord.

The etymology of the word freehold, English, Noun, freehold (countable and uncountable, plural freeholds)


    1. The tenure of property held in fee simple for life.

In English law, a simple or simple fee is an estate in the land, a form of freehold ownership.

It is a way that real estate and land may be owned in common law countries, and is the highest possible ownership interest that can be held in real estate.

The etymology of the word Ler, L + er.

  • Etymology 1. L, English, Pronunciation (letter) IPA (key): / ɛl. For the etymology of the word el, see El + atha above.

The etymology of the word er used to form the word Ler, L + er.

  • Etymology 1. er, English, Anagrams' re, -re, RE, Re, Re, re, re, re.
  • The etymology of the word Re, Ra or Re is the ancient Egyptian deity of the sun.
  • Etymology 2. er, Cornish, From Proto-Celtic * eriros ("eagle") (compare Breton erer, Welsh eryr, Old Irish irar), from Proto-Indo-European * h3érō. Noun er m (plural eryon or eres)
  1. eagle.
  • Etymology 2. er, Cornish, Noun, er m (plural erys)
  1. heir.
  • The etymology of the word heir, English, From Middle English heir, from Anglo-Norman eir, heir, from Latin hērēs. Noun heir (heirs)
  1. Someone who inherits or is designated to inherit the property of another.
  2. One who inherits or has been designated to inherit a hereditary title or office.
  3. A successor in a role, representing continuity with the predecessor.
  • Etymology 3rd er, Cornish, Noun, er
  1. Soft mutation of ger.
  • The etymology of the word ger, English, Noun, ger (plural gers)
  1. A yurt.
  • Etymology 2. Borrowed from Hebrew גֵּר (ger). Noun, ger (plural gerim)
  1. A male convert to Judaism.
  • Etymology 2. ger, Breton, From Proto-Brythonic * gėr, from Proto-Celtic * garyo- ("word, speech"), from Proto-Indo-European * Ôh2r-, zero grade of * Cognate with Ancient Greek (gêrus, voice, speech), Khotanese (script), Latin garriō ("chatter"), Old English ċearu ("sorrow"). Noun ger m (plural gerioù)
  1. word.
  • The etymology of the word, word, English (theology, sometimes Word) Logos, Christ.
  1. Synonyms: God, Logos.
  • Derived terms: geriadur ("dictionary")
  • The etymology of the word logos, noun: Logos.
  1. Theology, the Word of God, or the principle of divine reason and creative order, identified in the Gospel of John with the second person of the Trinity embodied in Jesus Christ.
  • Etymology 3rd ger, Faroese, From Old Norse. Noun ger f (genitive singular gerar, uncountable)
  1. yeast.
  • The etymology of the word yeast, English, Noun, yeast (countable and uncountable, plural yeasts).
  1. An often humid, yellowish froth produced by fermenting malt worts, used to brew beer, leaven bread, and also used in certain medicines.
  • See also: leaven.
  • The etymology of the word leaven, English, From Middle English levain, borrowed from Old French, from Late Latin levāmen, instead of levāmentum, ultimately from Latin levō ("I raise").
  • Etymology 4. ger, Old Dutch, From Proto-Germanic * gaizaz ("spear, pike, javelin"), from Proto-Indo-European * Óʰoys-ós drive, move, fling "). Noun gēr.
  1. spear, pike, javelin.
  • Etymology 5. ger, Old English, noun ġēr n (nominative plural ġēr)
  1. year
  2. the runic character ᛄ (/ j /).
  • Etymology 6. ger, Old German, From Proto-Germanic * gaizaz ("spear"). Noun, gēr
  1. spear.
  • Etymology 7. ger, Romanian, From Latin gelū, from Proto-Indo-European * gel- ("cold"). Noun, ger n (plural geruri)
  1. frost (cold weather that causes frost to form)
  2. frigidness, frosty weather.
  • See also frig.
  • Frig or Frigg, In Germanic mythology, Frigg (Old Norse), Frija (Old High German), Frea (Langobardic), and Frige (Old English) is a goddess. In almost all sources, she is described as the wife of the god Odin. In Old High German and Old Norse sources, she is also connected with the goddess Fulla. The English weekday name Friday (etymologically Old English "Frīg's Day") bears her name.
  • The etymology of the word frig, Welsh, Noun, frig
  1. Soft mutation of brig.
  • The etymology of the word brig, English, Abbreviated from brigantine, from Italian brigantino; in sense "jail", from the use of such ships as prisons. Noun, brig (plural brigs)
  1. (nautical) A two-masted vessel, square-rigged on both foremast and mainmast
  2. (US) A jail or guardhouse, especially in a naval military prison or jail on a ship, navy base, or (in fiction) spacecraft.
  3. and a Brig-rigged vessel. (and Brigid vessel.
  • See also: hermaphrodite brig.
  • Etymology 2nd brig, English, From Scots brig, from Old Norse bryggja, from Proto-Germanic * brugj. Doublet of bridge. Noun brig (plural brigs).
  1. (Scotland, Northern Ireland, Northern England) Bridge.
  • (Bridges), from Proto-Germanic * brugjō, * brugjoma ("bridge"), from Proto-Indo-European * bʰerw-, * bʰrēw- ("Wooden flooring, decking, bridge").
  • Cognate with Scottish brig, brigg, breeg, Bridge Frisian Bräge, Bridge Bridge, German Bridge, Danish Bro Bridge bridge and bridge bridges, bridge bridge and bridge bridge, bridge bridge crossboards, Old Church Slavonic braun (brŭvŭno, "beam") and Russian bravo (brevnó, "log").
  • The verb is from Middle English briggen, from Old English brycġian ("to bridge, make and causeway, pave"), derived from the noun. Cognate with Dutch bruggen ("to bridge"), Middle Low German bruggen ("to bridge"), Old High German bruccon ("to bridge") (whence Modern German brücken). Declension: Inflection of bridge (Kotus type 8 / nalle, no gradation), nominative bridge bridget.
  • The etymology of the word bridget / Bridget, English form of the Irish saints' name Brighid, Brigid. From Irish Brighid, from Old Irish Brigit, from Proto-Celtic * Brigantī ("high, exalted"). Proper noun, Brigid.
  1. (Irish mythology) The goddess of the Sacred Flame of Kildare and the patron goddess of the Druids. Daughter of Dagda of the Tuatha Dé Danann.
  2. Brigid of Kildare (c.451-521), an Irish saint partly confused with the goddess.
  3. A woman's name sometimes borrowed from Irish. English form: Bridget.
  • Etymology 3rd Brig, Clipping of brigadier, Noun, Brig (plural brigs).
  1. Brigadier.
  • Etymology 4. Brig, Polabian, From Proto-Slavic * berg. Noun brig.
  1. bank, shore (of a river).
  • The etymology of the word bank, English, Noun, bank (plural banks).
  1. An institution where you can borrow money and take care of financial affairs.
  • Etmology 2. English, Middle English Bank, Old English Bank ("couch") and Old English Bank ("bank, hillock, embankment"), from Proto-Germanic Banks. Akin to Old Norse bakki ("elevation, hill"), Norwegian bakke ("slope, hill").
  1. An edge of a river, lake, or other watercourse.
  • Etymology 5. Brig, Scots, From Old Norse bryggja, Noun brig.
  1. bridge.
  • Etymology of the word bryggja, Faroese, From Old Norse brugga, from Proto-Germanic * brewwaną. Verb bryggja (third person singular past indicative bryggjaði, third person plural past indicative bryggjað, supine bryggjað).
  1. to brew.
  • Etymology 2. bryggja, From Old Norse bryggja, from Proto-Germanic * brugj. Noun bryggja f (genitive singular bryggju, plural bryggjur).
  1. pier.
  • Etymology 6. Welsh, Noun, brig m (plural brigau).
  1. crest, peak, summit, mountain, top, kick.
  • Etymology 4. er, Dutch, Synonyms ervan.
  • The etymology of the word ervan, Dutch, Anagram raven.
  • The etymology of the word raven, English, From Middle English raven, comes from Old English hræfn, from Proto-Germanic * hrabnaz (compare Icelandic rabb, Dutch rabe, Norwegian Nynorsk ramn), from Proto-Indo-European * ḱorh2-. Compare Middle Irish Cream, Latin Corvus, Lithuanian Shark ("Magpie"), Serbo-Croatian Upper 'Id.', Ancient Greek Croak (kórax)), from * ḱer-, * ḱor-. Compare furthermore Latin crepō ("I creak, crack"), Sanskrit कृपते (kṛpate, "he laments, he implores"). Noun, raven (plural ravens).
  1. A common name for several, generally large and lustrous black species of birds in the genus Corvus, especially the common raven, Corvus corax.
  • Etymology 5. er, East Damar, Noun, er
  1. water.
  • Etymology 6th, Middle English, Rom Old English ēar. Noun, er.
  1. Alternative form of eare ("ear of grain").
  • Etymology 7. er, Norwegian Bokmål, Verb, er
  1. present tense of være (= to be).
  • Etymology 8, er, Old Dutch, From Proto-Germanic * airiz; see also ær. Cognate with Old Saxon ēr. Adverb, er (ēr)
  1. previously, in an earlier period, in a bygone time
  2. earlier, before a certain time or period.
  • Preposition er (ēr)
  1. (temporal) before, earlier than.
  • The etymology of the word temporal, English, From the Middle English temporal, from the Old Temple, from the Latin temporalis, from tempus ("season, time, opportunity"). Temporal adjective (comparative more temporal, superlative most temporal).
  1. (also grammar) Of or related to time.
  2. Of limited time; transient; passing; not perpetual.
  3. Of or related to the material world, as opposed to spiritual.
  4. Lasting a short time only.
  5. Civil or political, as distinguished from ecclesiastical. temporal power; temporal courts.
  • Etymology 2. temporal, English From the Latin Temple, the Temple, the Temple, the Temple, the Temple, the temple.
  • Adjective temporal (not comparable).
  1. of the temples of the head.
  • Noun, temporal (plural temporals).
  1. (anatomy) Either of the bones on the side of the skull, near the ears.
  2. Any of a reptile's scales on the side of the head between the parietal and supralabial scales, and behind the postocular scales.
  • Etymology 3rd temporal, Galician, 13th century. From Latin temporalis, from tempus ("time"). Noun, temporal m (plural temporais)
  1. (weather) storm, tempest.
  • Temporal adjective m, f (temporal term).
  1. temporal, pertaining to time
  2. temporal, transient, as opposed to eternal
  3. temporally, pertaining to the temples of the head
  4. (grammar) of a grammatical case in Hungarian.
  • Etymology 9. er, Old Saxon, Noun, ēr
  1. copper, bronze
  2. hours.
  • The etymology of the word copper, Pronunciation (General Australian) enPR: kō'pə, IPA (key): /kɔp.ə/. From Middle English coper, from Old English coper, copor (copper), from Late Latin cuprum ("copper"), contraction of Latin Cyprian brass, from Ancient Greek Cyprus ). Cognate with Dutch Copper ("copper"), German Kupfer ("copper"), Icelandic Copar ("copper"). From cop ("to take, capture", verb) + -er ("agent suffix"). For the etymology of the word cop, see the etymology of Kopsidas above.

The Cyprus / cypress tree was a symbol of death and the underworld to the ancient Romans.

It is a hardwood, so it was suitable for sarcophagi and was often planted in cemeteries because of its association with funeral practices.

Cypress was also present on the island where Diana and Apollo were born:

  • "On the same coast, slightly above the sea, is also Ortygia [an island which in rivalry with Delos, claimed to be the birthplace of Apollon and Artemis], which is a magnificent grove of all kinds of trees, of the cypress most of all. . . here is the mythical scene of the birth of Apollon and Artemis. "(Strabo, Geography, January 14, 1920) (Greek geographer C1st BC to C1st AD).

Not only was the cypress sacred to Diana and Apollo, but it was also important to the god Asclepius whose staff was made of cypress wood.


Etymology 10. er, Polish, Noun, er. genitive plural of era.


  • The etymology of the word era, English, Noun era (plural eras)
  1. A period of indeterminate length, generally more than one year.
  2. (geology) A unit of time, less than eons and greater than periods.
  • Etymology 2nd era, Chuukese, Verb, era, (intransitive) to say.
  • Related terms: ereni.
  • Etymology 3rd era, Old Dutch, From Proto-Germanic * aizō. Noun, ēra f
  1. honour.
  2. dignity.
  • Etymology 4th era, Old Saxon, From Proto-Germanic * aizō, whence also Old English ār, Old Norse eir. For the etymology of the word eir see above.
  • Noun, ēra 
  1. honour
  2. renown
  3. glory.
  • Etymology 4th era, Old Tupi, Noun, era.
  1. name.
  • Etymology 5th era, Portuguese, From Late Latin aera. Noun, it was f (plural eras)
  1. was (time period of indeterminate length, generally more than one year)
  2. (archeology) age (period of human prehistory)
  3. (geology) was (unit of time, less than aeons and greater than periods).
  • Etymology 11. er, Turkish, From Old Turkic (er), from Proto-Turkic * ēr ("man"), which, according to the controversial Altaic hypothesis, is possibly derived from Proto-Altaic * āra ) ("Man"). Related to noun-forming suffix -er. Noun, er (defined accusative, plural erler)
  1. brave
  2. man, male
  3. noble
  4. conscript, private (soldier of the lowest rank of the army)
  5. tribesman
  6. warrior

Ler appears as the titular king in the story of The Children of Lir. 

Ler is mainly an ancestor figure and is the father of the god Mananna mac Lir, who frequently appears in medieval Irish literature.













MANNANNAN MAC LIR

Man Lir is said to be the son of ler (Lir).

He is affiliated with both Tuatha Dé Danann and the Fomorians.

Man Lann / Ler is seen as the guardian of the Otherworld and one who ferries souls (Sidas) to the afterlife. 

The Man of the Lir and Lir are one and the same, he is known as Poseidon to the ancient Greeks, as Sobek / Osiris to the ancient Egyptians, and as Manu in India. 

With his sea-borne chariot, affiliation with horses and cloak of invisibility, Manannad mac Lir (Poseidon / Ler / Dagda / Osiris / Isis / Horus / Nephthys / Hades / Acheron / PersephoneBrigid / Demeter / Danu / Ops) the afterlife.

Man's Lir's daughter was Niamh, one of the queens of Tir on nóg (Atlantis), and his Welsh son, Bran the Blessed, possesses a cauldron, not unlike the Holy Grail. 

The etymology of Mananna mac Lir comes from Man + an + nan and Man + anan.

  • Etymology 1. Man, English, Proper noun, Man
  1. The genus Homo.
  2. (poetic) Humankind in general.
  • Etymology 2. Man, English, Proper noun, Man
  1. The Isle of Man.
  • The Etymology of the Isle of Man, English, Isle + of + Old Irish Mana, Proper noun, the Isle of Man
  1. An island in the Irish Sea.
  • The etymology of the word Mana, Old irish, Proper noun, Mana f (Genitive Manann, Dative Manainn)
  1. Isle of Man
  2. Anglesey.
  • The etymology of the word Anglesey, Proper noun, Anglesey
  1. An island and a traditional county at the northwestern extremity of North Wales. It is separated from Caernarfonshire on the mainland by a narrow stretch of water called the Menai Strait.
  2. A marquisate in the peerage of the United Kingdom.
  • Synonyms Mona (historical)
  • The etymology of the word Mona, Portuguese
  • Proper noun, Mona.
  1. Mona (ancient name of Anglesey).

The etymology of the word used to form the words Manannan (Man + an + nan) mac lir.

  • Etymology 1st year, Albanian, Possibly and metaphorical use of ané ("vessel"). Noun, an m (defined singular years)
  1. (anatomy) womb, caul
  2. (dialectal) vessel
  3. (dialectal, Italy) ship.
  • Synonyms: mitter.
  • The etymology of the word mitër, Albanian, From Greek womb, uterus.
  • Etymology 2nd year, Bourguignon, From Latin annus. Noun, an m (ans)
  1. year.
  • Synonyms dans.
  • The etymology of the word dans, French, Noun, dans.
  1. plural of dan. English, Anagrams DNA.
  • Etymology 2nd dan, Bambara, Verb, dan
  1. to count.
  2. to sow.
  • Etymology 3. Dan, Bambara, Verb, dan
  1. to pass beyond.
  • Etymology 4. dan, Biem, Noun, dan
  1. water.
  • Etymology 5. Cornish, Noun, dan
  1. Soft mutation of tan.
  • The etymology of the word tan, Czech, Symbol, tg
  1. (mathematics) A symbol of the trigonometric function tangent, equivalent to tan.
  • See also: sin.
  • The etymology of the word sin, Sīn or Nanna was the god of the moon in the Mesopotamian religions of Akkad, Assyria and Babylonia. Nanna is a Sumerian deity, the son of Enlil and Ninlil, and was identified with the Semitic Sīn. The two principal seats of Nanna's / Sīn's worship were Ur in the south of Mesopotamia and Harran in the north. A moon god by the same name was also worshiped in South Arabia.
  • Etymology 2. tan, English, Borrowed from French tan ("tanbark"), from Gaulish tanno- "green oak" - compare Breton tann ("red oak" "Green oak"), from Proto-Indo-European * dong ("fir"). Related to Hittite [tango], Latin femur, genitive feminis ("thigh"), German Tann ("woods"), Tanne, "Albanian thanë" Ancient Greek shrub (thámnos, "thicket"), Avestan (tanuuarə), Sanskrit धनु (dhan) (Danu).
  • Noun, tan (plural tans)
  1. The bark of an oak or other tree from which tannic acid is obtained.
  • Etymology 3rd tan, Englis, From a Brythonic language; influenced in form by yan ("one") in the same series.
  • The etymology of the word yan, English, Along with ane and yen, and the Northumbrian form of one, from the Old English án. An example is "yan, twee, tree" for "one, two, three". Numeral yan
  1. (Northumbria) One.
  • Etymology 2. yan, Chamorro, Conjunction, yan
  1. and.
  • See also ya.
  • The etymology of the word ya, Reduced form of you. Compare Dutch is a reduced / unstressed form of jij ("you"). Alternative forms yaa, yaw, yah.
  • Etymology 2. ya, Bilbil, Noun, ya
  1. threads.
  • Etymology 3. ya, Abui, Noun, ya
  1. water.
  • Etymology 4. Warao, Noun, ya
  1. sun.
  • Etymology 5. Yami, Pronoun, ya
  1. he; she.
  • The etymology of the word is, Determiner, is (second person, possessive)
  1. Second-person singular, unstressed form of jouw (your)
  2. Second-person plural, unstressed form of jullie (your) (plural).
  • The etymology of the word jullie, Dutch, From earlier jelui, from jij ("you") and his ("people").
  • Etymology 2nd, German, Old High German io. Homophone: jäh (only according to a regional pronunciation of this word).
  • The etymology of the word io. Io was a priestess of the Goddess Hera in Argos. The ancients connected Io with the Moon, and in Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound, where Io encounters Prometheus, she refers to herself as the horned virgin, both bovine and lunar.
  • The etymology of the word jäh, Jah. shortened form of Yahweh, the Hebrew name for God.
  • Etymology 2. Yah, Yah, is a lunar deity in the ancient Egyptian religion. The word yah simply means "moon". It is also transliterated as Yah, Jah, Jah (w), Joh or Aah.
  • Etymology 3rd is, Haitian Creole, Noun, is
  1. eye.
  • Etymology 3. yan, Turkish, From Old Turkic * yan-, * ya-, from Proto-Turkic * yā- ("side"). Noun, yan
  1. side (bounding)
  • The word "side, flank, edge, shore", from Proto-Indo-European, from Old English sīde ("side, flank" * sēy- ("to send, throw, drop, sow, deposit"). Cognate with the West Frisian side, Dutch side, German Side, Danish and Norwegian side, Swedish side.
  • The etymology of the word sida, Ilocano, Noun, sida
  1. fish.
  • Etymology 2. sida, Old High German, Akin to Italian set.
  • The etymology of the word set, English, Anagram, east.
  • Etymology 2nd set, Galician, Noun, seta f (plural setas)
  1. arrow.
  • Etymology 3rd set, Polish, Noun, set
  1. genitive singular of set.
  • The etymology of the word set, English, (close of the day): dusk, eve, evening, sunset, sunset.
  • Etymology 2nd set, Catalan, From Old Occitan, from Latin septem ("seven"), from Proto-Indo-European * sept.
  • The etymology of the word septem, Derived terms
  1. September.
  • Etymology 3rd set, English, Alternative forms, Seth, Sutekh. Borrowed from Coptic ⲥⲏⲧ (sēt), from Egyptian st, Proper noun, Set
  1. (Egyptian mythology) An ancient Egyptian god, variously described as the god of chaos, the god of thunder and storms, or the god of destruction.
  • Etymology 2. Side, Middle Irish, From Old Irish. Noun, side
  1. and fairy hill or mound
  2. (in plural) = áes side ("people of the fairy mounds, supernatural beings, fairies").
  • Etymology 4. yan, Volapük, Noun, yan (plural yans)
  1. door.
  • Etymology 4. tan, From Old English tān ("twig, switch"), from Proto-Germanic * tainaz ("rod, twig, straw, lot"). Noun, tan (plural tans)
  1. (dialectal) A twig or small switch.
  • Related terms: mistletoe.
  • The etymology of the word mistletoe, Noun, mistletoe (countable and uncountable, plural mistletoes)
  1. (countable, uncountable) Any of several hemiparasitic evergreen plants of the order Santalales with white berries that grow in the crowns of apple trees, oaks and other trees, such as the European mistletoe (Viscum album) and American mistletoe or eastern mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum).
  2. (uncountable) A sprig of one such plant used as a Christmas decoration, associated with the custom that a man may kiss any woman standing below it.
  • Mistletoe played an important role in Druidry in the Ritual of Oak and Mistletoe. The ritual of oak and mistletoe is a Celtic religious ceremony, in which white-clad druids climbed a sacred oak, cut down the mistletoe growing on it, sacrificed two white bulls and used the mistletoe to make an elixir to cure infertility and the effects of poison.
  • In the Norse folklore, Loki tricked the blind god. The Bald was a threat to Balder with a arrow made of Mistletoe, the only plant to which Balder was vulnerable.
  • Etymology 5. tan, Chuukese, Noun tan
  1. dream.
  • Etymology 6. tan, Old Swedish, Noun, tan.
  1. tooth.
  • Etymology 7th, Turkish, From Old Turkic taŋ (taŋ, "sky, sunrise, daylight"). Noun, tan (definite accusative tanı, plural tanlar)
  1. dawn, twilight, sunrise, daylight.
  • Etymology 8. tan, Wolof, Noun, tan (defined form tan mi)
  1. vulture.
  • Etymology 3rd year, Fuyug, Noun, aning (aning)
  1. man.
  • Etymology 4th, German, From Old High German ana.
  • The etymology of the word ana, From Old High German ana. Akin to Latin anus ("old woman"), Old Prussian ane ("grandmother"), etc. Noun, ana
  1. grandmother
  • Related terms
  1. yes (grandfather).
  • Etymology 5th, Girawa, Noun, an
  1. water.
  • Etymology 6th, Irish, Verb, an (present analytic anann (anan), future analytic anfaidh, verbal noun anacht, past participle anta).
  • Etymology 7th, Loniu, Noun, an
  1. fresh water.
  • The etymology of the word anann, Homonym, annan.
  • The etymology of the word anan, found in the word Manannán or Manann, also known as Manannán mac Lir ("son of the sea") Finnish, Verb, annan, Anagrams, Nanan, nanna.
  • The etymology of the word nanna, Possibly derived from Proto-Celtic * nana ("grandmother"). Noun, nanna plural nannas
  1. grandmother.
  • Etymology 2. Nanna, Sīn or Nanna was the god of the moon in the Mesopotamian religions of Akkad, Assyria and Babylonia. Nanna is a Sumerian deity, the son of Enlil and Ninlil, and was identified with the Semitic Sīn. The two principal seats of Nanna's / Sīn's worship were Ur in the south of Mesopotamia and Harran in the north. A moon god by the same name was also worshiped in South Arabia.
  • The etymology of the word sin. English, From Middle English sinne, sinne, sunne, zen, from Old English Sync ("sin"), from Proto-Germanic * sunjō ("truth, excuse" -Indo-European * hss-on-ih2, from * hssnts ("being, true", from * h1es- ("to be"); compare Old English sōþ ("true"; see sooth).
  • Etymology 2. sin, Hunsrik, From Middle High German sein, sīn, from Old High German sīn ("to be") (with some parts from Proto-Germanic * and beuną exist, become "), from Proto-Indo-European * es-, * hses- (" to be, exist ").
  • Etymology 3. sin, Menien, Noun, sin.
  1. water.
  • Etymology 4. sin, English, Noun, sin sins
  1. (theology) A violation of God's will or religious law.
  2. A misdeed. 
  3. A sin offering; to sacrifice for sin. 
  4. An embodiment of sin; a very wicked person.
  • Etymology 8th, Middle Welsh, Determiner, an
  1. Alternative form of yn.
  • earth is the Hellenic word for earth.
  • Etymology 9th, Norman, From Old French, from Latin annus. Derived terms
  1. Jour dé l'An ("New Year's Day")
  2. Nouvel Year ("New Year")
  3. tchu d'l'an ("last day of the year").
  • Etymology 10. an, Old English, Numeral, ān

    1. (cardinal) one.

  • Etymology 11th, Adjective, ān
  1. lone
  2. sole.
  • The etymology of the word lone, Afrikaans, Noun, lone
  1. plural of loon.
  • The etymology of the word Loon, English, From Middle English louen, lowen ("rascal; rogue"), probably of Middle Dutch or Middle Low German origin. Compare Dutch loen ("simpleton"). Or, related to sense 2, due to the bird's loud cry. [1] Folk etymology associates it slang-wise with the lunatic, though the latter may have influenced it; see loony.
  • Etymology 2nd loon, Of North German origin, from Old Norse lrom ("loon"), ultimately imitative of bird's cry, especially when it's in danger. Distantly related to lament, probably sharing Proto-Indo-European * leh2- (expressive root).
  • Etymology 3. Scots, Noun, loon (plural loons)
  1. (Doric) boy, young man.
  • The etymology of the word sole, English, Homophones: Seoul, soul, sowl.
  • From Middle English soules, sowle, orle, sawle, from Old English sāwol ("soul, life, spirit, being"), from Proto-Germanic * saiwalō ("soul"). Cognate with Scots saul, soul (soul), North Frisian siel, soul (soul), Saterland Frisian Seele (soul) Seele ("soul") Scandinavian homonyms seem to have been borrowed from Old Saxon * siala. Modern Danish sjæl, Swedish själ, Norwegian sjel. Icelandic Hall may have come from Old English sāwol.
  • The etymology of the word sal, Icelandic, Attested since the 16th century; origin uncertain. Perhaps from Proto-Germanic * sahalō, from the root * seh- ("to cut"), originally denoting a bag sewn from cut-out pieces of skin; or perhaps from * sawalō, related to sjóður ("purse"), or from * saihalō, related to sár ("cask"). Noun, hall f (genitive singular sálar, nominative plural sálar)
  1. and skin bag.
  • Etymology 2. Sal, Old Irish, From Proto-Indo-European * séh2ls. Akin to Latin sal and English salt. Noun, hall.
  1. salt water, brine, seawater
  2. (poetic, by extension) sea, ocean.
  • Etymology 2nd sole, Italian, From Latin sōlem, accusative case of sōl, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European * sóh2wl̥. Cognates include Greek sun, Icelandic sól, Hindi सूर्य (sūrya), and Russian solt (sólnce). Noun, salt m (salt)
  1. Sun (the Earth revolves around)
  2. sunlight
  3. (poetic) daytime, day (the interval between sunrise and sunset)
  4. (poetic) year
  5. (poetic, in the plural) eyes.
  • Etymology 3rd sole, Norman, From Vulgar Latin * sola, from Latin solea. Noun, sole f (soles)
  1. sole (fish).
  • Etymology 4. sole, Neapolitan, Noun, sole.
  1. Sun.
  • The etymology of the word Sun, Homophones son.
  • The etymology of the word son, English, Alternative forms: sonne (obsolete). From Middle-English sonn, sone, sun, sune, from Old English sunu, from Proto-Germanic * sunuz, from Proto-Indo-European * Indo-European * sewH- ("to bear; give birth"). Cognate with Scots son, Saterland Frisian Suun ("son"), West Frisian soan ("son"), Dutch zoon (son), Low German sone, son "Son"), German Sohn (son), Danish son (son), Swedish son (son), Icelandic sonur (son), Lithuanian sūnùs, "Son"), Avestan (hūnuš, "son"), Sanskrit सूनु (sūnu, son), Ancient Greek huiús, son (huiós, son) "), Armenian ուստր (ustr," son "), Tocharian B soy, soṃśke (" son "). son sons
  1. One's male offspring.
  2. A male descendant.
  • Antonyms
  1. (with respect to gender) daughter.
  2. (with respect to ancestry) father, mother, parent.
  • Hypernyms: child.
  • Etymology 2nd son, English, From Middle English sonen, sunen, from the noun (see above). Verb, son (third-person singular simple present sons, present participle sonning, simple past and past participle sonned)
  1. (transitive) It produces (ie bear, father, beget) and son.
  2. (transitive) To address (someone) as "son".
  • Etymology 3rd son, Aromanian, From Latin sonus. Compare Daco-Romanian sun. Noun, son n (plural sonuri)
  1. sound.
  • Related terms: asun.
  • The etymology of the word asun, Basque, Noun, asun
  1. nettle (stinging herb of the genus Urtica).
  • The etymology of the word Urtica, Translingual, Latin urtica ("nettle"). Proper noun, Urtica.
  1. A taxonomic genus within the family Urticaceae - the nettles.
  • Hypernyms: (genus): Eukaryota - superking; Plantae - kingdom; Viridiplantae - subking; Streptophyta - infrakingdom; Embryophyta - superphylum; Tracheophyta - phylum; Spermatophytin - subphylum; angiosperms, eudicots, core eudicots, rosids, eurosids I - clades; Rosales - order; Urticaceae - family.
  •  Etymology 4th son, Catalan, From Vulgar Latin sum, from Classical Latin suum. Usage notes: The use of son and other possessive determiners is mostly archaic in most dialects, with articulated possessive pronouns (eg el my) mostly being used in their stead. However, mon, ton, and son are still widely used before certain nouns referring to family members and some affective nouns such as amic, casa, and vida. Which nouns actually find use with the possessive determiners depends greatly on the locale.
  • The etymology of the word vida, Catalan, From Old Occitan vida, from Latin vīta, from Proto-Italic * gʷītā. Noun, vida f (plural vides)
  1. life.
  • Etymology 2. Vida, Novial, Verb, Vida (visible vid, active participle vidant, passive participle vidat).
  1. see.
  • Dervided term: Holy See / Sea.
  • Etymology 4. vida, Venetian, From Latin vītis, vītem. Compare Italian cattle, Istriot veid. Noun, vida f (plural vide)
  1. is coming.
  • Etymology 5. son, Ladin, Alternative forms sun. Verb son
  1. first-person singular present indicative of ester.
  • The etymology of the word ester, English, From German Ester, perhaps a contraction or abstraction of Essigäther ("ethylacetát"), from Essig ("vinegar") and Äther ("ether"). See ether for more.
  • Etymology 2nd Stage, Ladin, From Vulgar Latin * essere, from Latin esse, present active infinitive of sum. Verb, ester
  1. that be.
  • Etymology 3rd Stage, Middle English, From Old English ēaster. Noun ester (esters).
  1. Easter (Christian holiday).
  • The etymology of the word Easter, English, from the Middle English Ester, Eestour, from Old English ēastre ("Easter"), cognate to Old High German ōstarūn, and related to the castle, herself, and the goddess and her festival which was celebrated at vernal equinox, from Proto-Germanic * Austróm, from Proto-Indo-European * h₂éwsōs, as well as to the east. Cognate with German Low German Oostern ("Easter"), German Ostern and German Osterfest ("Easter"). Noun, Easter (numbered and uncountable, plural Easters)
  1. (Christianity) A Christian feast commemorating the resurrection of Christ; the first Sunday (and Monday) following the full moon that takes place on or after the vernal equinox, ranging from March 22 to April 25.
  2. Eastertide
  3. (obsolete) The Jewish Passover.
  4. A festival held in honor of the goddess Eostre or Ostara, celebrated at the spring equinox or in the month of April, also called Ostara or Eostre.
  5. Easter term.
  • See also
  1. Pasch
  2. Passover
  3. Passion Sunday
  4. Palm Sunday
  5. Maundy Thursday
  6. Good Friday.
  • The etymology of the word Passover, English, From the verb phrase pass over. Proper noun, Passover (Passover)
  1. The eight-day Semitic Festival of Pesach, commemorating the biblical story of Exodus, during which the first-born sons of the Israelites were passed over while those of the Egyptians were killed.
  2. The one-day Biblical feast that starts at twilight on the fourteenth day of the first month (Nisan 14), which is immediately followed by the seven-day Feast of Unleavened Bread (Nisan 15-21).
  3. The Christian holy day generally falls on the first day of the Jewish Passover.
  • See also
  1. Paschal, Paschal
  2. Quartodeciman
  3. Quartodecimanism
  4. seder.
  • The etymology of the word seder, English, borrowed from Hebrew סדר (seder, "order"). Pronunciation (UK) IPA (key): / seɪdə /. Noun seder (plural seders or sidarim or siddarim).
  1. (Judaism) The ceremonial meal held on the first night or two nights of Passover.
  2. (Judaism) One of the 54 parts into which the Torah is divided (5 + 4 = 9).
  • Etymology 2nd seder, Interlingua, Verb, seder
  1. sit it.
  • Etymology 3. seder, Norwegian Bokmål, From Ancient Greek cedar (kédros), via Latin cedrus. Noun, seder m (defined singular sederen, indefinite plural sedere or sedre or sederer, defined plural sederne or sedrene)
  1. and cedar (tree of the genus Cedrus).
  • Etymology 4. seder, Nubi, Noun, séder (plural sederá)
  1. tree.
  • Etymology 5. seder, Swedish, Noun, seder
  1. indefinite plural of sed.
  • The etymology of the word sed, Latin, Alternative forms
  1. set.
  • Set is a god of desert, storms, disorder, violence, and foreigners in ancient Egyptian religion. In Ancient Greek, the god's name is given as Sēth. Set a positive role where he accompanies Ra on his solar boat to repel Apep, the serpent of Chaos. Set a vital role as a reconciled combatant. He was the lord of the red (desert) land where he was the balance of Horus' role as a lord of the black (soil) land. In Egyptian mythology, Set is portrayed as the usurper who killed and mutilated his own brother Osiris.
  • Etymology 2nd ed., Swedish, Etymology, From Old Swedish Sierra, from Old Norse siðr, from Proto-Germanic * siduz.
  • The etymology of the word Siduz, Proto-Germanic, Uncertain. On the suggestion that the meaning "custom" developed from "band, bond", Kroonen tentatively reconstructs the Pre-Germanic * bond ("bond, rule, tradition"), from Proto-Indo-European * seh2y- ("to bind" .
  • Descendants: Old English: sidu, seodu
  1. Middle English: side
  2. Old Frisian: side
  3. North Frisian: side, sit
  4. Saterland Frisian: Sidde
  5. West Frisian: sit
  6. Old Saxon: sid
  7. Middle Low German: side
  8. Old Dutch: sido
  9. Middle Dutch: sēde
  10. Dutch: ride
  11. Old High German: Situ
  12. Middle High German: site
  13. German: Sitte
  14. Luxembourgish: Sitt
  15. Old Norse: siðr
  16. Icelandic: siður
  17. Faroese: siður
  18. Old Swedish: sièer, sedher
  19. Swedish: sed
  20. Danish: sæd
  21. Gothic: 𐍃𐌹𐌳𐌿𐍃 (sidus).
  • Etymology of the word sidus, Ido, Verb, sidus
  1. conditional of sidar.
  • The etymology of the word sidar, Ido, From Esperanto sidi, from English sit, German situs, from Proto-Germanic * sitjaną, Italian, from Latin sedēre, present active infinitive of sedeō, Russian stede, from Old East Slavic sidѣти (sidmí), from Proto-Slavic * learn, all ultimately from Proto-Indo-European * sed-. Verb, sidar (present tense sid, past tense sid, future tense sidos, imperative sidez, conditional sidus)
  1. (intransitive) to sit, be sitting.
  • The etymology of the word sidas, Spanish, Verb, sidas f pl
  1. Feminine plural past participle of ser.
  • The etymology of the word ser, Baure, Noun, ser
  1. tooth.
  • Etymology 2. Ser, Aragonese, From Latin sedēre, present active infinitive of sedeō ("I sit, I reside"). However, many of the forms derive from Vulgar Latin * essere, from Latin esse, sum. Verb, ser
  1. that be.
  • Noun, ser m (plural seres)
  1. being
  • Etymology 3. Ser, Catalan, Alternative forms
  1. ésser.
  • From a reduction of ésser, from Vulgar Latin * essere and this from Latin esse, present active infinitive of sum, from Proto-Italic * ezom, from Proto-Indo-European * hueste ("I am, I exist").
  • Etymology 4. Ser, Kurdish, Noun, Serm
  1. head (Kop)
  • Etymology 5. Ser, Middle Dutch, Noun, ser
  1. (title and pronoun) Sir, Lord.
  • The etymology of the word lord, English, From Middle English lord and lord (attested from the 15th century), from the earlier (14th century) lourdes and other variants which dropped the intervocalic vocals of the earlier lower, louerd, loverd, laford, and lhoaverd ; from Old English hlāford and hlāfweard, a compound of hlāf ("bread, loaf") + weard ("ward, guardian, keeper"); see loaf and ward. The compound exists in Icelandic as a lávarður, related to the Old English hlāf-ǣta ("servant", literally "bread-eater"); it was already widely applied before the literary development of Old English and was influenced by its common use to translate Latin dominus. Compare the Scots laird ("lord"), preserving and separating the vowel development, and modern English lady, from Old English hlǣfdīġe ("bread-kneader"). Noun, lord.
  1. any nobleman or aristocrat; any chief, prince, or sovereign ruler.
  2. synonyms: master, lord and master, ruler, leader, chief, superior, monarch, sovereign, king, emperor, prince, governor, commander, captain, overlord, suzerain, baron, potentate, liege, liege lord.
  3. and name for God or Christ.
  • Etymology 6. ser, Mirandese, See also, star.
  • The etymology of the word star, English, From Middle English sterre, from the Old English steorra ("star"), from Proto-Germanic * sternó, * stern ("star"), from Proto-Indo-European * h₂stḗr "). Noun, star (plural stars)
  1. Any small luminous dot appearing in the cloudless part of the night sky, especially with a fixed location relative to other such dots.
  2. (astronomy) A luminous celestial body, made of plasma (especially hydrogen and helium) and having a spherical shape. Depending on the context, the sun may or may not be included.
  3. (geometry) A concave polygon with regular, protrusions and indentations, generally with five or six points.
  4. A pentagram (sometimes known as a pentagon, pentangle or star pentagon) is the shape of a five-pointed star.
  • See also:
  1. astronomers
  2. black hole
  3. galaxy
  4. moon
  5. mullet
  6. planets
  7. red gian
  • Etymology 2nd star, Slovene From Proto-Slavic * Old. Adjective, stàr (comparative old, superlative nàjstarêjši)
  1. old, aged.
  • Etymology 7. ser, Spanish, Partially from Old Spanish, from Latin, present active infinitive of sedeō ("I sit, I reside"), from Proto-Italic * sedēō, from Proto-Indo-European * sed-, and partially from Vulgar Latin * essere, from Latin esse, present active infinitive of sum, from Proto-Italic * ezom, from Proto-Indo-European * hses ("I am, I exist"). Noun serm seres
  1. and being, body
  2. nature, essence
  3. value, worth.
  • Usage notes: Portuguese and Spanish have two different verbs, which are usually translated into English as "to be": ser is related to essence, contrasting with estar, which relates to state. Contrast the following:
  1. El hombre está feliz. - The man is [currently] happy.
  2. He hombre es feliz. - The man is [always] happy.
  • Etymology 8. ser, Turkish, From Persian سر (sar), Noun, ser (definite accusative {{{1}}} plural {{{2}
  1. (archaic) head.
  • Synonyms (head): baş, kafa.
  • Etymology 9. ser, Volapük, Numeral, ser
  1. zero.
  • The etymology of the word zero, English, from French zéro, from Italian zero, from Medieval Latin zephirum, from Arabic صفر (نور, "nothing, cipher").
  • The etymology of the word cipher, English, 14th century. From Old French Cyfre, French (French Chiffre), ultimately from Arabic صفر (نور, "zero, empty"), from صفر (ṣafara, "to be empty"). Compare zero. Sense 9 may be a different word. Noun, cipher (plural ciphers).
  1. A numeric character.
  2. Any text character.
  3. A combination or interweaving of letters, as the initials of a name; a device; and a monogram.
  4. A method of transforming a text to conceal its meaning.
  5. (cryptography) A cryptographic system using an algorithm that converts letters or sequences of bits into ciphertext.
  6. Ciphertext; and message concealed via a cipher.
  7. A grouping of three digits in a number, especially when delimited by commas or periods:
  • Synonyms: (obsolete: zero): naught / nought, nothing, oh, zero.
  • Etymology 2nd zero, Numeral, zero
  1. (cardinal) The cardinal number occurring before one and that denotes no quantity or amount at all, represented in Arabic numerals as 0.
  • Synonyms
  1. 0
  2. cipher
  3. (informal) goose egg
  4. love (tennis)
  5. naught (US)
  6. nought
  7. nil
  8. no
  9. null
  • See also: Table of cardinal numbers 0 to 9 in various languages.
  • Noun, zero (countless and uncountable, plural zeroes or zeroes).
  1. The digit 0 in the decimal, binary, and all other base numbering systems.
  2. (mathematics, algebra) The additive identity element of a monoid or greater algebraic structure, especially a group or ring.
  • Antonyms: (value of a function's variables at zero): field.
  • Etymology of the word field, English, From Middle English field, pal, from Old English pāl ("a field, stake, a kind of hoe or spade"), from Proto-Germanic * palaz, * pālaz "), From Latin pālus (" stake, pale, prop, stay ") from Old Latin * paglus, from Proto-Indo-European * pāe- (" to nail, fasten ").
  • Etymology of the 2nd field, From Middle French pole, pole, and its source, Latin polus, from the ancient Greek pole (polos, "axis of rotation"). Noun
  • field (plural poles)
  1. Either of the two points on the earth's surface around which it rotates; Also, similar points on any other rotating object.
  2. A point of magnetic focus, in particular each of the two opposing points of a magnet (designated north and south).
  3. (geometry) A fixed point relative to other points or lines.
  4. The firmament; the sky.
  • Etymology 3rd Field, Aiwoo, Verb, Field
  1. to work (in a garden or field)
  • Etymology 4th Field, Esperanto, Adverb, Field
  1. in Polish.
  • Etymology 3rd zero, Kurdish, zer + -o Noun, zero
  1. blond (male).
  • Etymology 10, ser, Welsh, Noun, serum m serod or seroedd
  1. billhook, sickle, scythe
  2. (dictionary) sword.
  • Etymology 2. sidus, Latin, Compare Ancient Greek iron (sídēros). Some derive this from the Proto-Indo-European * sweyd-, whence Latin sūdor, Greek Ύδρω (hidrṓs), English sweat. Noun, sīdus n (genitive sīderis); third declension
  1. constellation, asterism
  2. and star
  • Synonyms: astēr, astrum, stēlla
  1. (poetic) the night sky
  2. (figuratively) and season (of the year).
  • Etymology 6. son, Alternative forms
  1. sun
  2. sion
  • The etymology of the word sion, English, Noun, sion (plural sions)
  1. Obsolete spelling of scion.
  • Etymology 2nd Sion, English, Proper noun, Sion
  1. Alternative spelling of Zion.
  • The etymology of the word Zion,
  1. A mountain (kick) on which Jerusalem is built.
  2. Jerusalem.
  • Etymology 2. Zion, German, Alternative forms
  1. on.
  • Proper noun, Zion m (genitive zions)
  1. Zion (a mountain).
  • The etymology of the word kop, English, Afrikaans, Noun, kop kops)
  1. (South Africa) A hill or mountain (Zion).
  • Etymology 7th son, Lower Sorbian, Noun, son
  1. (archaic) swan (waterfowl of the genus Cygnus).
  • Etymology 12th, Torres Strait Creole, From English hand. Noun, an
  1. hand, lower arm.
  2. flipper.
  • Etymology 13th, Vilamovian, Related terms, alf.
  • The etymology of the word alf, Danish, From Old Norse alfr, from Proto-Germanic * albiz. Noun, alpha c (singularly defined alpha, plural indefinite alfer)
  1. fairy
  2. elf.
  • Etymology 2. alf, West Frisian, Numeral, al
  1. eleven (he + even).
  • The etymology of the word elf, English, From Middle English elf, elfe, from Old English ælf ("incubus, elf"), from Proto-Germanic * albiz, from Proto-Indo-European * h₂elbʰós ("white"). Noun, elf (plural elves). Noun elf (elves).
  1. (Norse mythology) A luminous spirit presiding over nature and fertility and dwelling in the world of Álfheim (Elfland). Compare angel, nymph, fairy.

The etymology of nan used to form the word Man + an + nan (Manannan mac Lir).

  • Etymology 1st, English, Possibly derived from a Celtic language. Noun, nan (plural nans).
  1. (Britain, affectionate) A grandmother.
  • Synonyms
  1. nana
  2. nanna.
  • The etymology of the word nanna, Nanna is a Sumerian deity, the son of Enlil and Ninlil, and became identified with the Semitic Sīn.
  • In Norse mythology, Nanna Nepsdottir or simply Nanna is a goddess associated with the god Baldr.
  • Baldr (also Balder, Baldur) is a god in Norse mythology, and a son of the god Odin and the goddess Frigg. He has numerous brothers, such as Thor and Váli.
  • The etymology of the word nana, Variant spelling of nanna. Noun, nana plural nanas
  1. (informal, term of endearment) One's grandmother.
  • Etymology 2, nana, Northern Paiute, Noun, nana (naana plural)
  1. man.
  • Etymology 2, nan, Kurdish, From Middle Persian LHMA (nān, "bread, food").
  • Etymology 3rd nan, Lower Sorbian, Noun, nan m (diminutive nancycko)
  1. father.
  • Coordinate terms
  1. maś ("mother")
  2. son ("son")
  3. źowka ("daughter").
  • Etymology 4. nan, Vietnamese, Equivalent to the noun derivative of đan ("to weave").
  • The etymology of the word đan, Vietnamese, Verb đan (單, 撣, 攔,,, 簞)
  1. to weave (a basket, etc.)
  2. to weave (fabric)
  3. to plait (hair)
  4. to embroider.

The etymology of the word mac used to form the words Manannan Mac Lir.

  • Etymology 1. mac, Irish, from Old Irish macc, from Primitive Irish ᚋᚐᚊᚊᚔ (maqqi, genitive), from Proto-Celtic * makkʷos, and variant of * makʷos (" . Noun, mac m (singular small genitive, small plural nominative)
  1. son
  2. A common prefix of many Irish and Scottish names, meaning "son of".
  • Coordinate terms, iníon ("daughter").
  • Etymology 2. mac, Manx, from Old Irish macc, from Primitive Irish ᚋᚐᚊᚊᚔ (maqqi, genitive), from Proto-Celtic * makkʷos, and variant of * makʷos ("son"), perhaps, from Proto-Indo-European * meh2 - ("long, thin"). Noun, mac m (singular genitive small, plural mec)
  1. son.
  • Etymology 3. mac, Romanian, Noun, mac m maci)
  1. poppy.

The etymology of the word Lir and L + ir, used for the words Manannan Mac Lir.


  • Etymology 1. Lir, Czech, Noun, lir
  1. genitive plural of lira.
  • The etymology of the word lira, From Italian lira, from Latin lībra (partly through Turkish lira, Arabic ليرة (līra), Maltese lira, Lithuanian lira, and Hebrew לִירָה, all of which are originally from the Italian) . Doublet of livre. Noun, lira (lire or liras)
  1. The basic unit of currency in Turkey.
  2. The currency of Lebanon (also pound), Syria (also pound), Jordan (also dinar)
  3. The former currency of Italy, Malta, San Marino, Cyprus and the Vatican City, superseded by the euro.
  • Noun, lira (lirot or liroth or liras)
  1. The former currency of Israel, superseded by the sheqel.
  • Etymology 2. lira, Catalan, Noun, lira f (plural lires)
  1. lyre.
  • The etymology of the lyre, English, From Ancient Greek lyra (lyra, "lyre, and stringed instrument with a sounding board formed from the shell of a tortoise"). Noun, lyre (plural lyres)
  1. (music) An ancient stringed musical instrument (a yoke lute chordophone) of Greek origin, consisting of two arms extending from a body to a crossbar (a yoke), and strings, parallel to the soundboard, connecting the body to the yoke.
  2. Any instrument of the same musicological classification; any yoke lute.
  3. A lyre-shaped sheet music holder that attaches to a wind instrument when a music stand is impractical.
  • The earliest reference to the word is the Mycenaean Greek ru-ra-ta-e, meaning "lyrists" and written in the Linear B script. [3] In classical Greek, the word "lyre" could either refer specifically to an amateur instrument, which is a smaller version of the professional cithara and eastern Aegean barbitone, or "lyre" can generally refer to all three instruments as a family. ] The English word comes from Latin from the Greek.
  • According to ancient Greek mythology, the young god Hermes stole and the herd of sacred cows from Apollo. In order not to be followed, he made shoes for the cows that forced them to walk backwards. Apollo, following the trails, could not follow where the cows were going. Along the way, Hermes slaughtered one of the cows and offered all but the entrails to the gods. From the entrails and a tortoise / turtle shell, he created the Lyre. Apollo, figuring out it was Hermes who had his cows, confronted the young god. Apollo was furious, but after hearing the sound of the lyre, his anger faded. Apollo offered to trade the herd of cattle for the lyre. Hence, the creation of the lyre is attributed to Hermes. Other sources credit it to Apollo himself.
  • The so-called lyres of Ur, excavated in ancient Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), date back to 2500 BC and are considered to be the world's oldest surviving stringed instruments.
  • Over time, the name in the broader Hellenic space was used to label mostly bowed lutes such as the Byzantine lyre, the Pontic lyra, the Constantinopolitan lyra, the Cretan lyre, the lira da braccio, the Calabrian lira, the lijerica, lyra viol, the lirone.
  • Other instruments known as lyres have been fashioned and used in Europe outside the Greco-Roman world since at least the Iron Age. The remains of what is thought to be a 2300-year-old lyre were discovered on the Isle of Skye, Scotland in 2010 making it Europe's oldest surviving stringed musical instrument.
  • Etymology 2, lira, From Latin lībra. Related terms libra.
  • The etymology of the word libra, Portuguese, Noun, libra f (libras)
  1. pound (unit of mass)
  2. pound (sterling or other currency).
  • Etymology 2, Pound, Latin, Noun, lībra f (genitive lībrae); first declension
  1. and the Roman unit of measure, equal to twelve ounces; and pound (abbreviated lb.)
  2. a pair of scales, balance
  3. and a device for making horizontal.
  • Etymology 3. libra, italian, noun, libra f (plural libre)
  1. pounds.
  • Etymology 4. libra, Czech, Noun, libra f
  1. pound (unit of measure)
  2. pound (currency).
  • Etymology 5. libra, English, Noun, libra (librae or libras)
  1. A Roman unit of weight equal to about 327 grams.
  2.  Any of the various units of weight in Spanish and Portuguese-speaking countries are approximately equal to 460 grams or slightly more than US or UK pounds.
  3. Alternative spelling of libbra, an Italian unit of weight.
  • Etymology 5. Pound, Libra, English, From Latin lībra ("scales, balance"). Proper noun, Libra
  1. (astronomy) A constellation of the zodiac, supposedly shaped like a set of scales.
  2. (astrology) The astrological sign for the scales, ruled by Venus and covering September 24 - October 23 (tropical astrology) or October 16 - November 16 (sidereal astrology).
  • The Libra (♎) is the seventh astrological sign in the Zodiac. It spans 180 ° -210 ° celestial longitude. Under the tropical zodiac, Sun transits this area between September 23 and October 23, and under the sidereal zodiac, Sun is currently transiting the constellation of Libra from approximately October 16 to November 17. The symbol of scales is based on the Scales of Justice held by Themis, the Greek personification of divine law and custom. She became the inspiration for modern depictions of Lady Justice. The ruling planet of Libra is Venus. Libra is the only zodiac constellation in the sky represented by an inanimate object. The other eleven signs are represented either as an animal or mythological characters throughout history.
  • Libra is one of the three zodiac air signs, the others being Gemini and Aquarius. The sign of the Libra is symbolized by the scales. The moon was said to be in Libra when Rome was founded. Everything was balanced under this fair sign. The Roman writer Manilius once said that Libra was the sign "in which the seasons are balanced". Both the hours of the day and the hours of the night match each other. So why the Romans put so much trust in the "balanced sign". Going back to ancient Greek times, Libra the constellation between Virgo and Scorpio used to be over ruled by the constellation of Scorpio. They called the Latin word "chelae", which translated into "the claws" which can help identify the individual stars that make up the full constellation of Libra,
  • According to the tropical system of astrology, Sun enters the sign of Libra when it reaches the southern vernal equinox, which occurs around September 22.
  • Natives of this sign are said to have an affinity for having a balance within their lives and are very people oriented.
  • Etymology 6. Libra, English, Noun, Libra (Libras)
  1. Someone with a Libra star sign.
  • Antonyms, Aries.
  • The etymology of the word Aries, English, From Latin aries ("ram"). Proper noun
  • Aries (symbol ♈)     
  1. (astronomy) A constellation of the zodiac supposedly shaped like a ram.
  2. (astrology) The zodiac sign for the ram, ruled by Mars and covering March 20 - April 20 (tropical astrology) or April 15 - May 15 (sidereal astrology).
  • Derived terms, Arian.
  • Aries (♈) / ɛəriːz / (meaning "ram") is the first astrological sign in the zodiac, spanning the first 30 degrees of the celestial longitude (0 ° ≤ λ <30 °). Under the tropical zodiac, Sun transits this sign from approximately March 20 to April 21 each year. This time is exactly the first month of the Solar Hijri calendar (Hamal / Farvardin / Wray). The symbol of the ram is based on the Chrysomallus, the flying ram that provided the Golden Fleece.
  • According to the tropical system of astrology, Sun enters the sign of Aries when it reaches the March equinox, which time systems and the western calendar are rooted in, so it will occur on average on March 21. Because Earth takes approximately 365.25 days to go around the Sun, the exact time of the equinox is not the same every year, and generally will occur about six hours later from one year to the next. February 29 of a leap year, that year's equinox dropped to about eighteen hours earlier than in the previous year. Since 1900, the vernal equinox date has ranged from March 20 at 08h (2000) GMT to March 21 at 19h (1903) GMT. March 19 at 23:20 will occur in 2044 UT1. In contrast, under the sidereal zodiac, Sun currently transits Aries from April 15 to May 14 (approximately).
  • Aries is the first fire sign in the zodiac, the other fire signs being Leo and Sagittarius. Individuals born between these dates, depending on which astrological system they subscribe to, may be called Arians or Ariens.
  • The equivalent in the Hindu solar calendar is Meṣa
  • The etymology of the word Arian, English, Noun, Arian Arians
  1. Alternative form of Aryan.
  • The etymology of the word Aryan, English, Alternative forms Arian. From Sanskrit आर्य (ārya, "noble" or "noble one"), from Proto-Indo-Iranian * áryas (the original Indo-Iranian autonym). Borrowed into English in the 19th century, at first as a term for the Indo-Iranian languages, and later extended to the Indo-European languages ​​and peoples following a theory by Friedrich Schlegel that connected the Indo-Iranian words arya / ārya with German Ehre ("honor") and some older Germanic names, assuming that it was the original Indo-European autonym meaning "the honorable people".
  1. A person of Caucasian ethnicity; and white non-Semite.
  • Derived terms: Graeco-Aryan.
  • The etymology of Graeco-Aryan, English, Graeco- + Aryan, Proper noun, Graeco-Aryan.
  1. (Indo-European Studies) and proposed branch within the Indo-European language family, of which the Hellenic and Indo-Iranian branches have sub-branches.
  • Etymology 3. lira, Latin, From Proto-Italic * loizā, from Proto-Indo-European * lóyseh2 ("track, trace, trail") . Cognate with Oscan feminine ablative plural 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 (𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔,,,,, 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 𐌋𐌖𐌉𐌔𐌀𐌓𐌉𐌚𐌔 "" " bed, furrow "), Old Prussian lyso (" field bed "), Proto-Germanic * lizaną (" to know, understand "), * laizijaną (" teach "), * liznaną. Noun, līra f (genitive līrae); first declension.
  1. the earth thrown up between two furrows, a ridge
  2. (agriculture) furrow.
  • The etymology of the word furrow, Noun, furrow (plural furrows)
  1. A trench cut in the soil, as when plunged to plant a crop.
  2. Any trench, channel, or groove, as in wood or metal.
  • Verb, furrow (third-person singular simple present furrows, simple past and past participle furrowed)
  1. (transitive) To make (a) groove, cut (s) in (ground etc.).
  • Etymology 2nd lir, Irish, Noun, lir
  1. genitive singular of lear.
  • The etymology of the word lear, From Middle English laire, leire, lere, northern Middle English, lore ("doctrine, teaching, lore"), from Old English lār ("lore"). More at lore. Noun, lear (countable and uncountable, plural lears)
  1. (now Scotland) Something learned; and lecture.
  2. (now Scotland) Learning, lore; doctrines.
  • Etymology 2nd Lear, From Middle English learen, leren ("to learn", also "to teach"). Doublet of learn.
  • Verb lear (third-person singular simple present lears, simple past and past participle leared).
  1. (transitive, archaic and Scotland) To teach.
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To learn.
  • Anagrams, Earl.
  • The etymology of the word Earl, English, From Middle English erl, from Old English eorl, from Proto-Germanic * erlaz (compare Old Norse jarl, Old German and Old Saxon erl), from Proto-Germanic * erōną, compare Old Norse Spring ("fight, battle"), from Proto-Indo-European * h1er- (compare Latin orior, "to urge, incite" Avestan (ərənaoiti, "to move"), Sanskrit ऋणोति (ṛṇóti, "to arise, reach, move, attack")). Also displaced unrelated but similar ealdorman. Noun earl (Earls)
  1. A British or Irish nobleman next in rank above a viscount and below a marquess; equivalent to a European count. A woman using the style is termed a countess.
  • Etymology 3. lear, Irish, Noun, lear m (genitive singular lir)
  1. (literary or archaic, except in phrases) sea, ocean.
  • Etymology 4. Volapük, Noun, lear (lears)
  1. olive tree.
  • The etymology of the word L used to form the word L + ir (Manannar mac Lir).
  • Etymology 1. L, Translingual, Letter, L (lower case 1).
  1. The twelfth (12th) letter of the basic Latin Latin alphabet (1 + 2 = 3).
  • Symbol L
  1. Symbol for liter or liter (biochemistry) IUPAC 1-letter abbreviation for leucine
  2. (set theory) Constructible universe
  3. (computer science) Deterministic logarithmic space.
  • The etymology of the word leucine, English, borrowed from Ancient Greek white (leukós, "white") + -in.
  • Etymology 2. L, English, Pronunciation (letter) IPA (key): / ɛl /, Letter, L (Ls or Ls)
  1. The twelfth letter of the English alphabet, called el and written in the Latin script.
  • Etymology 3. L, Noun, L
  1. Alternative spelling of el.
  • For the etymology of the word el / El see above (El + atha / El + ada).
  • Etymology 4. L, Galician, Abbreviation, L
  1. leste (east).
  • The etymology of the word leste, Galician, Alternative forms
  1. E
  2. L
  • Noun leste m lestes
  1. (uncountable) east (cardinal direction)
  2. (uncountable) the eastern portion of a territory or region
  3. (countable) an eastern; and wind blowing from the east.
  • Synonyms
  1. (east): levante, nacente, oriente
  2. (eastern portion): Oriente
  3. (eastern wind): levante
  • The etymology of the word levante, Esperanto, Adverb, levante
  1. present adverbial active participle of levi.
  • The etymology of the word levi, Esperanto, From Italian levare ("to lift") and Latin levō. Verb, levi (present levas, left levis, left levos, conditional leu, volitive left)
  1. to lift, to raise.
  • Etymology 2nd levi, Serbo-Croatian, Adjective, lĕvī (Cyrillic spelling lȇvӣ)
  1. left
  2. left-wing
  3. (heraldry) sinister.
  • Etymology 3rd levi / Levi, English, From Hebrew לֵוִי, (Semitic) and name in the book of Genesis. Proper noun, Levi
  1. The third son of Jacob, by his wife Leah.
  2. One of the Biblical tribes of Israelites descended from Levi; the tribe from which priests were selected.
  3. A male given name.
  4. A Semitic / Jewish surname.
  • Anagrams: Viel, evil, live, veil, villa, vlei.
  • Etymology 2, levante, Italian, Present participle of levarsi ("to rise"). Corresponds to Latin levans, levant ("raising"), in reference to the rising of the sun. Adjectives, levante (masculine and feminine plural levanti)
  1. rising
  • Noun levante m (levanti)
  1. east
  2. East (wind), levanter.
  • Synonyms (1) est.
  • The etymology of the word oriente, Esperanto, oriento + -e, Adverb, oriente
  1. easterly.
  • Etymology 2. oriente, Italian, From Latin orientem (possibly borrowing), accusative form of oriens, present participle of orior ("I rise, get up"), in reference to the rising of the Sun. Noun, oriente m (plural orienti)
  1. geography: east, orient
  2. characteristic of a pearl: orient
  3. freemasonry: lodge.
  • The etymology of the word lodge, English, From Middle English logge, from the Old French Loge ("cobnate Latin lobia, laubia"), from Frankish * laubija (shelter; arbor) from Proto-Germanic * laubą ("leaf, folliage") (whence leaf). Cognate with Old High German louba ("Laurel"), Old High German loub ("leaf, foliage"), Old English lēaf ("leaf, foliage"). Related to lobby, loggia. Noun, lodge (plural lodges)
  1. A building for recreational use such as a hunting lodge or a summer cabin.
  2. Porter's or caretaker's rooms at or near the main entrance to a building or an estate.
  3. A local chapter of some fraternities, such as Freemasons.
  4. (US) A local chapter of a trade union.
  5. A rural hotel or resort, an inn.
  6. A beaver's shelter built on a pond or lake.
  7. A day or cave.
  8. The chamber of an abbot, former or head of a college.
  9. (mining) The space at the mouth of a level next to the shaft, widened to allow wagons to pass, or ore to be deposited for hoisting; called also platt.
  10. A collection of objects lodged together.
  11. A family of Native Americans, or the people who usually occupy an Indian lodge; as a unit of enumeration, reckoned from four to six persons.
  • Etymology 2nd leste, Italian, Adjective leste f, female plural of lesto Anagrams stele.
  • The etymology of the word stars, English, A parallel etymology to stale ("handle, shaft, stem"), distinguished via ablaut. Noun, star steles
  1. Obsolete form of stale.
  • Etymology 2. star, From Ancient Greek Column (stḗlē, "upright rock; pillar; column"), plural form (stêlai). Noun, star (steles or stelai)
  1. (archeology) An upright (or formerly upright) slab containing engraved or painted decorations or inscriptions; and stela.
  2. (archeology, uncommon) Any carved or engraved surface.
  3. (architecture, archeology, obsolete) An acroterion, the decoration on the ridge of an ancient Greek building such as a temple.
  • Usage notes: Although stela and stars were used in antiquity for pillars and columns generally, they continued to carry that meaning when their use was revived in English archeology and architecture in the 18th and 19th century, respectively, the present use usually distinguishes obelisks, columns, shafts (the body of a column between the capital and the frontier), etc., from stela and stars, which are used to refer to engraved slabs or small pillars.
  • Furthermore, although the terms still refer to small pillarlike gravestones from antiquity, the similar-looking herms are now often distinguished, as have modern gravestones, monuments, boundary markers, etc.
  • The terms sometimes refer to undecorated rocks when they have been raised by artificial means in prehistoric times, especially when they are weak-like, but large neolithic menhirs are usually distinguished as Chinese scholar's rocks or Taihu rocks, and other modern uses of upright stones as decoration or signage.
  • Stars are often pluralized irregularly as stelae, but this is a hypercorrection resulting from confusion with the Latin-derived stela. The anglicized Greek plural stelai has been used since the late 19th century but is less common than steles.
  • The etymology of the word obelisk, English, 1569. From the Middle French obelisk, from the Latin obeliskus (obelisk), from the ancient Greek obelisk (obelískos), diminutive of the obelós ("needle"). Noun, obelisk (plural obelisks)
  1. A tall, square, tapered, stone monolith topped with a pyramidal point, frequently used as a monument.
  2. (printing) The dagger sign (†), especially when used as a reference mark.
  • See also: menhir, pillar.
  • Etymology 3. stele, From 1886 French stèle, from Ancient Greek στήλη (stḗlē, “upright rock; pillar; column”). Noun stele (plural steles)
  1. (botany) The central core of a plant's root and stem system, especially including the vascular tissue and developed from the plerome.
  • Etymology 4. stele, Friulian, From Latin stēlla. Noun, stele f (plural stelis)
  1. star.
  • Etymology 5. stele, Istro-Romanian Noun stele f (plural form of ste)
  1. stars.
  • Etymology 6. stele, Middle English, Noun, stele (plural steles)
  1. steel.
  • The etymology of the word ir used to form the word Lir, L+ir (Manannán mac Lir).
  • Etymology 1. Irish, Danish, From Old Norse eir. Anagrams: -ier, Eri., IRE, ire, rei.
  • The etymology of the word Eri, Eri, See also Ériu, in Irish mythology, one of the patron goddesses of Ireland
  • In Irish mythology, Ériu (Irish pronunciation: [eːrʲu]; modern Irish Éire), daughter of Delbáeth and Ernmas of the Tuatha Dé Danann, was the eponymous matron goddess of Ireland.
  • The etymology of the word ire, English, From Middle English ire, yre, shortened form of iren ("iron"). More at iron. Noun ire
  1. (obsolete) Iron.
  • Etymology 2. ire, From Middle English ire, from Old French ire ("ire"), from Latin ira ("wrath, rage"), from Proto-Indo-European * eis- (to fall upon act sharply) (compare "Old English Estimate", Old Norse eisa ("to race forward"), Ancient Greek hierós, "supernatural, holy", ostros, "frenzy; gadfly", Avestan aesma 'anger', Sanskrit eṣati 'it drives on'). Noun ire (uncountable)
  1.  (literary, poetic) Great anger; wrath; keen resentment.
  • Etymology 3. ire, Norwegian Nynorsk Noun ire m (defined singular iren, indefinite plural irar, defined plural irane)
  1. person from Ireland, Irishman.
  • Etymology 4. ire, Italian Noun ire f
  1. plural of ira.
  • The etymology of the word ira, Makalero Noun ira
  1. water.
  • Etymology 5. ire, From Latin to present active infinitive of eō.
  • The etymology of the word eō, Irish, Noun is m (genitive singular iach, nominative plural iaich).
  1. 1. (figuratively) noble being, prince.
  • Etymology 2. eo, From Old Irish eo, from Proto-Celtic * iwos, from Proto-Indo-European * heyeyHweh2 ("yew"); cognate with Welsh yw and English yew. Noun is f (genitive singular eo).
  1. (literary) yew tree.
  • Etymology 5. ire, Anagrams eri, rei, riè.
  • The etymology of the word rei, Asturian, From Latin rēx, rēgem. Noun rei m (plural reis)
  1. king
  • Related terms: reina.
  • The etymology of the word reina, Asturian reina, From Latin rēgīna. Noun
  • reina f (plural reines)
  1. queen.
  • The etymology of the word eir, Icelandic, Synonyms kopar.
  • The etymology of the word kopar, Faroese, From Late Latin cuprum ("copper"), contraction of Latin (aes) Cyprium (from "Ancient Greek Cyprus"). Noun kopar (genitive singular kopars, uncountable)
  1. copper.
  • The etymology of the word Cyprus, English, Via Latin Cyprus, from Ancient Greek Cyprus (Kúpros). Proper noun, Cyprus. Homophone: cypress.
  1. Country in the Middle East, in the Mediterranean Sea.
  • The etymology of the word cypress, English, From Old French Cypriots, from Ancient Greek Cypress (kupárissos), probably from an unknown Mediterranean Pre-Greek language; see Hebrew גפר (gopher), the name of the tree whose wood was used to make the ark (Genesis vi: 14). Noun cypress (plural cypresses)
  1. An evergreen coniferous tree with flattened shoots with small scale-like leaves, whose dark foliage is sometimes associated with mourning, in the family Cupressaceae, especially the genera Cupressus and Chamaecyparis.
  2. Silk or cotton gauze fabric, usually black.
  • The cypress tree was a symbol of death and the underworld to the ancient Romans. It is a hardwood, so it was suitable for sarcophagi and was often planted in cemeteries because of its association with funeral practices.
  • Cypress was also present on the island where Diana and Apollo were born:
  • "On the same coast, slightly above the sea, is also Ortygia [an island which in rivalry with Delos, claimed to be the birthplace of Apollon and Artemis], which is a magnificent grove of all kinds of trees, of the cypress most of all. . . here is the mythical scene of the birth of Apollon and Artemis. "(Strabo, Geography, January 14, 1920) (Greek geographer C1st BC to C1st AD).
  • Not only was the cypress sacred to Diana and Apollo, but it was also important to the god Asclepius whose staff was made of cypress wood.
  • The English word "Copper", "Copper" (Copper), from the Latin English cupper ("Copper"), from the Latin English Copper (literally "Cyprian brass" Ancient Greek Cyprus (Coupros, "Cyprus"). Cognate with Dutch Copper ("copper"), German Kupfer ("copper"), Icelandic Copar ("copper").
  • Etymology 2nd eir, Old French, Latin hērēs Noun, eir m (oblique plural eirs, nominative singular eirs, nominative plural eir)
  1. heir.
  • Etymology 2. ir, Kaera, From Proto-Alor-Pantar * jira. Noun ir
  1. water.
  • Etymology 3. ir, Latin, Cognate with Ancient Greek (kheir). Noun, ir n (indeclinable)
  1. (rare, anatomy) hand.
  • Etymology 4. Ir, Latvian, From Proto-Baltic * ir, from the reduced grade * r̥ of Proto-Indo-European * ar (" ). The original meaning "and" (cf. Lithuanian cognate) is found in the 16th and 17th century texts, but since the 18th century on it was no longer used in this sense. Cognates includes Lithuanian ir ("and"), Old Prussian ir ("also"), er ("along"), Ancient Greek āra, therefore ").
  • The etymology of the word, Ancient Greek
  • Alternative forms
  1. ᾰ̓р (ár) - before a consonant
  2. ᾰ̓r '(ár') - apocopic
  3. ῥᾰ (rha) - after a monosyllabic word or a word ending in a vowel.
  • The etymology of the word ῥᾰ (rha), Ancient Greek, Pronunciation IPA (key): / r̥a / → / ra / → / ra /
  • The etymology of the word ra, Ancient Greek, Borrowed from Egyptian rꜥ, Pronunciation IPA (key): / r̥âː / → / ra / → / ra /, Proper noun, Ῥα • (Rha).
  1. Ra.
  • Ra (or reɪ /; Coptic: ⲣⲏ, Rē) is the ancient Egyptian deity of the sun.
  • Synonyms: kā ... tā ...
  • The etymology of the word ka, Egyptians believed that the human soul was composed of two parts, the Ka (physical soul) and Ba (conscience).
  • Synonyms: arī.
  • The etymology of the word arī, Faroese, From Old Norse Ari, from ari ("eagle"). Cognate with Norwegian Are.
  • Ari or Aris is a common shortened version of the Greek names Aristotle, Ariadne, Ariadne, Aristides, Aristarchus, Aristobulos, Aristophanes, Aristophanes, Aristophanes, adjectival superlative áristos, "best". They are also modern Greek transliterations for Ares, the god of war and the name for the planet Mars.
  • The etymology of the word apocopic, apo + cop + ic or apo + kick + ik.
  • Etymology 1st apo, Bahnar, From Proto-Bahnaric * ʔmpəw, from Proto-Mon-Khmer * mp (ɔ) ʔ ("to dream"); cognate with Halang hópô, Koho mpao, Semai mpo, Pacoh apo / mpo, Old Mon 'ampo', Central Nicobarese [Nancowry] enfūa. Verb, apo
  1. to dream.
  • Etymology 2nd apo, Cebuano, Noun, apo
  1. grandchild.
  • Verb apo
  1. It has a grandchild or grandchildren.
  • Etymology 3rd apo, East Futuna, From English apple. Noun apo
  1. (Alo) apple.
  • Etymology 4. apo, Hiligaynon, Noun apo,
  1. grandchild
  • Noun
  1. grandfather.
  • Etymology 5. Ilocano Noun, apo
  1. master.
  2. sir.
  • The etymology of the word sir, From Middle English sir, borrowed from Old French sire ("master, sir, lord"), from senex ("old"). Compare sire, signor, seignior, señor.
  • See also
  1. lord
  2. (titles) (of a man): Mr (Mister, Mister), Sir (Sir); (of a woman): Ms (Miz, mizz), Mrs (Mistress, mistress), Miss (Miss), Dame (non-binary person): Mx (Mixer); (see also): Dr (Doctor, doctor), Madam (madam, ma'am).
  • The etymology of the word master, English, From Middle English maister, mayster, meister, from Old English mistr, mæġster, mæġester, mæġister, magister ("master"), from Latin magister Old Latin magester, from mag- (as in magnus ("great")) + -ester / -ister (compare minister ("servant")). Reinforced by Old French maistre, mestre from the same Latin source. Compare also Saterland Frisian Masters, Master Meister, Master Meister, German Meister (master). Noun, masters
  1. Somebody who has control over something or someone.
  2. The owner of an animal or slave.
  3. (nautical) The captain of a merchant ship; and master mariner.
  4. (dated) The head of a household.
  5. Someone who employs others.
  6. An expert at something.
  7. A tradesman who is qualified to teach apprentices.
  8. (dated) A schoolmaster.
  9. A skilled artist.
  10. (dated) A man or a boy; mystery. See Master.
  11. A master's degree; and a type of postgraduate degree, usually undertaken after a bachelor degree.
  12. A person holding such a degree.
  13. The original of a document or of a recording.
  14. (movie) The primary wide shot of a scene, in which the closeups will be edited later.
  15. (law) A parajudicial officer (such as a judge, an auditor, an examiner or an assessor) specially appointed to assist a court with its proceedings. The case was tried by a master, who concluded that the plaintiffs were the equitable owners of the property.
  16. (engineering) A device that controls other devices or is an authoritative source (eg master database).
  17. (freemasonry) A person holding an office of authority, especially the chairing officer.
  18. (by extension) A person holding a similar office in other civic societies.
  • Etymology 6. apo, Latin, Verb, apō (present infinitive apertures, perfect api, supine aptum); third conjugation.
  1. (hapax legomon) I fasten; attach, connect; join, bind.
  • Etymology 7th apo, Greek, from. from = from in Greek.
  • The etymology of the word cop, apocopic, apo + cop + ic.
  • Etymology 1. cop, From Middle English coppe, from Old English * coppe, as in ātorcoppe ("spider", literally "venom head"), from Old English copp (" round-the-head, from Proto-Indo-European * gū- ("to bend, curve"). Cognate with Middle Dutch kick, cobbe ("spider"). More at cobweb.
  • Etymology 2. cop, English, From Middle English cop, coppe, from Old English cop, copp, from Proto-Germanic * kuppaz ("vault, basin, round object") from Proto-Indo-European * gu-. Cognate with Dutch kick, German Kopf. Noun, cop (plural cops).
  1. (obsolete) The top, the summit, especially of a hill.
  2. (obsolete) The crown (of the head); also the head itself.
  • Etymology 3. cop, Czech, Noun, cop 
  1. braid.
  • Etymology 4. cop, Middle English, Noun, cop (plural coppes)
  1. summit (of a mountain or hill)
  2. top, tip, topmost part
  3. top of the head, crown
  4. head.
  • The etymology of the word crown, English, Borrowed from Anglo-Norman Coruna, Curve, Old French Corone (French couronne), from the Latin corona ("wreath"). Doublet of corona. Noun, crown
  1. A royal, imperial or princely headdress; and a diadem.
  2. (heraldry) A representation of such a headdress, as in heraldry; it may even be that the only image exists, no physical crown, as in the case of the Kingdom of Belgium; the analogues such crowns can be awarded to moral persons who do not even have a head, as the mural crown for cities in heraldry
  3. A wreath or band for the head, especially one given as a reward of victory or a mark of honor.
  4. (by extension) Any reward of victory or a mark of honor.
  5. Imperial or regal power, or those who wield it.
  6. (metonymically) The sovereign (in a monarchy), as head of state.
  7. (by extension, especially in law) The state, the government (headed by a monarch).
  8. Treasure recovered from shipwrecks automatically becomes property of the Crown.
  9. The topmost part of the head.
  10. The highest part of a hill.
  11. The top section of a hat, above the brim.
  12. The raised center of a road.
  13. The highest part of an arch.
  14. Splendor; culmination; acme.
  15. Any currency (originally) issued by the crown (regal power) and often bearing a crown (headdress); (translation) various currencies known by similar names in their native languages ​​such as the crown, crown, crown.
  16. (historical) A former British decade of coin worth five shillings.
  17. (botany) The part of a plant where the root and stem meet.
  18. (forestry) The top of a tree.
  19. (anatomy) The part of a tooth above the gums.
  20. (dentistry) A prosthetic covering for a tooth.
  21. (nautical) A knot formed in the end of a rope by tucking in the strands to prevent them from unravelling
  22. (nautical) The part of an anchor where the arms and the shank meet
  23. (nautical) The rounding or rounded part of the deck from a level line.
  24. (nautical, in the plural) The bits formed by the turns of a cable.
  25. (paper) A standard paper size measuring 20 inches x 15 inches.
  26. (chemistry) A monocyclic ligand having three or more binding sites capable of holding a guest in a central location
  27. (medicine) During childbirth, the appearance of the baby's head from the mother's vagina.
  28. (firearms) A rounding or smoothing of the barrel opening
  29. The upper range of facets in a rose diamond.
  30. The dome of a furnace.
  31. (geometry) The area enclosed between two concentric perimeters.
  32. (religion) A round spot shaved clean on the top of the head, as a mark of the clerical state; the tonsure.
  33. A whole turkey with the legs and wings removed to produce a joint of white meat.
  34. (African American Vernacular, colloquial) A formal hat worn by women to Sunday church services; and church crown.
  • Synonyms:
  1. (reward of victory or honor of honor): award, garland, honor / honor, prize, wreath
  2. (royal, imperial or princely headdress): coronet
  3. (representation of such a headdress):
  4. (wreath or band for the head): garland, wreath
  5. (imperial or regal power): monarchy, royalty
  6. (of the head): apex, top
  7. (of a hill): apex, peak, summit, top
  8. (center of a road):
  9. (the highest part of an arch):
  10. (of a hat): top
  11. (splendor, finish, culmination): completion, culmination, finish, splendor / splendor
  12. (currency):
  13. (British coin): caser, tusheroon, tush, tosheroon, tosh, bull, caroon, thick-un, coachwheel, cartwheel
  14. (part of plant):
  15. (anatomy: part of tooth): corona
  16. (dentistry: prosthetic cover for a tooth):
  • Antonyms: (of a hill): base, bottom, foot.
  • Etymology 2nd Crown, English, Adjective, Crown (not comparable)
    1. Of, related to or related to a crown. crown prince.
    2. Of related to the top of a tree or trees.
  • The Crown Verb (third-person singular simple present crowns, the present participle crowning, the simple past and the past participle crowned)
  1. To place a crown on the head of.
  2. Formally declare (someone) a king, queen, emperor, etc.
  3. It bestows something like a mark of honor, dignity, or reward; to adorn; it dignify.
  4. It forms the topmost or finishing part of; to complete; to consummate; it's perfect.
  5. Declare (someone) a winner.
  6. (medicine) Of a baby, during the birthing process; for the surface of the baby's head to appear in the vaginal opening. The mother was in the second stage of labor and the fetus was just crowned, prompting a round of encouragement from the midwives.
  7. (transitive) To cause to round upward; it makes anything higher at the middle than at the edges, like the face of a machine pulley.
  8. It hit the head.
  9. (video games) To shoot a opponent in the back of a head with a shotgun in a first-person shooter video game.
  10. (board games) In checkers, stack two checkers to indicate that the piece has become a king.   
  11. (firearms) It widen the opening of the barrel.
  12. (military) To effect a lodge upon, as the crest of the glacis, or the summit of the breach.
  13. (nautical) To lay the ends of the strands of (and knot) over and under each other.
  • Derived terms: crowned.
  • See also: coronation.
  • Etymology 3. English, Verb, Crown.
  1. (obsolete) past participle of crow.
  • Etymology 5. cop, Volapük, Noun, cop (plural cops)
  1. (tools) hoe.
  • The etymology of the word ic used to form the word apo + cop + ic.
  • Etymology 1. ic, Translingual, Alternative forms (Roman numeral): IC, XCIX, xcix. Symbol ic
  1. (informal) A Roman numeral representing nine-nine (99). 9 + 9 = 18. 1 + 8 = 9.
  • Etymology 2. ic, Middle Dutch, Pronoun, ic.
    1. I.
  • Etymology 3. ic, Old English, Alternative forms
  1. ih
  2. iċċ
  • The etymology of the word ih, Apiaká, Noun, ih
  1. water
  2. river
  • Etymology 2nd, Old English, Pronoun ih
  1. (Anglian) I
  • Etymology 3. Old High German, From Proto-Germanic *, *, possibly, from a preform * from Proto-Indo-European * éhhom ("I"), directly from Proto-Indo-European * "). Cognates includes Old Saxon, Old Dutch, Old English iç, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).
  • Etymology 4. ih, Trimuris, Noun, ih
  1. woman.
  • Etymology 4. ic, Old Saxon, From Proto-Germanic * ek, from Proto-Indo-European * éH2. Compare Old Frisian ik, Old English iċ, Old Dutch, Old High German, Old Norse Ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).
  • The etymology of the word ik, Angguruk Yali, Noun, ik.
  1. water.
  • Etymology 2. German Low German, Pronoun, I, (bridge northern and western dialects) I (first person singular pronoun).
  1. Ik kem, ik sach, ik wünd.
  2. I came, I saw, I conquered. (Veni, see, vici, Attributed to Julius Caesar.)
  • Etymology 3. ik, Gothic, Romanization, ik.
  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌺.
  • The etymology of the word 𐌹𐌺, Gothic, From Proto-Germanic * ek, from Proto-Indo-European * ePH2, compare Sanskrit अहम् (aham), Ancient Greek γώ (egṓ) and Old Church Slavonic azú.
  • Etymology 4. ik, Kaqchikel, Noun, ik.
  1. sun.
  2. chili.
  • Etymology 5. ik, Pwaamei. Noun, ik.
  1. louse.
  • The etymology of the word louse, Pronunciation (UK) IPA (key): / laʊs / laos / Ancient Greek, people. Rhymes: -aʊs / aos. The aos network, the older form, is the Irish term for a supernatural race in Irish mythology and Scottish mythology (similar to fairies or elves). They are told to live underground in fairy mounds, across the western sea, or in an invisible world that coexists with the world of humans.
  • The etymology of the word laos, Ancient Greek, people, Alternative forms.
  1. (leṓs) (Attic)
  2. (Ionic).
  • From Proto-Hellenic * lāwós, possibly from Proto-Indo-European * leh2wos ("people (under arms)"), from * leh2- ("military action"). Cognate with Hittite [script required] (laḫḫa, "campaign") and Phrygian lagaughs (lawagtaei). Noun, los (lāós) m (genitive λᾱο); second declension
  1. people, people assembled, the people of a country
  2. the soldiers
  3. common people (as opposed to leaders or priests); the subjects of a prince.
  • Etymology 2. louse, English, Anagrams, Eolus, Seoul, Soul, loues, oules, ousel, souls.
  • The etymology of the word Seoul, English, French Seoul, which is from Korean 서울 (Seoul, literally "capital city"). Note that it precedes the standard romanization Seoul in Korean. Homophones: sole, soul, sowl.











ATLANTIS / Karya

Atlantis was also known as Karya to my ancient ancestors.

Solon (Greek: Solon Sólōn, c. 638 - c. 558 BC) was an Athenian statesman, lawmaker, and poet. 

Solon belonged to the Eupatrid clan, the descendant of the royal stock.

Solon's lineage can be traced back to Codrus, the last King of Athens. 

Solon himself was a Celtic / Druidic / Kop Sida ancestry. 

Solon's clear and concise description of Atlantis / Karya is contained in two of Plato's dialogues, Critias and Timaeus.

Critias and Timaeus.

  • "There was an island in front of the straits ... In a single day and night of misfortune, all your warlike men in a body sank into the earth, and the island of Atlantis in the same way disappeared into the depths of the sea." 

Solon visited Egypt between 590 and 580 BC.

The Egyptians had records on the island of Atlantis / Karya (Tir na nÓg).

The Egyptians first translated the names of the Tuatha Dé Danann and the island of Tir into their tongue and then Solon (the athenian stateman, lawmaker, and poet) himself, on the other hand, recovered the original sense of each title and rendered it into the Hellenic (Greek) tongue, and wrote it down (Atlantean / Atlantis / Atlantyda (Atlant-ida / Atlas-ida). 

Karya (Brigid) is the female version of Atlas (Bodb Derg / Bodb Sida / Kop Sida)

Plato; 424/423 - 348/347 BC was a philosopher in Classical Athens.

His father was Ariston. 

Ariston traced his descent from the king of Athens, Codrus, and the king of Messenia, Melanthus.

Plato's mother was Percy, whose family also traced their descendants from the Athenian lawmaker and lyric poet Solon.

Plato's account of a cataclysmic event that destroyed Atlantis is said to be 9,000 years before Solons time, ie 11,600 before present. 

Atlantis (Karya) was located in the Atlantic Ocean west of the pillars of Hercules.

Plato Timaeus - Critias.

  • "A mighty power which unprovoked made an expedition against the whole of Europe and Asia. This power came out of the Atlantic Ocean "from" an island situated in front of the straits which you call the Pillars of Heracles. "

The Pillars of Hercules is the ancient term for the Strait of Gibraltar

Plato Timaeus - Critias page 301.

  • And when they had done their sacrifice according to their laws, and consecrating all the limbs of the bull, they mixed a bowl of wine and poured it on behalf of each one with a gout of blood, and the rest they carried to the fire, when they had fist purged the pillars round about. And after that they drew out of the bowl with golden ladles, and making libations over the fire swore to give judgment according to the laws on the pillar, and to punish whosoever had committed any previous transgression; and, moreover, that henceforth they would not transgress any of the writings voluntarily nor govern or submit to any governor's edict save in accordance with their father's laws. And when each of them had made this call for himself and his seed after him, he drank of the cup (Kop-seed-a) and offered it as a gift in the temple of the God; and after the sacrificial fire had died, all the princes robed themselves in the most beautiful sable vestment and sat on the ground beside the cinders of the sacramental victims throughout the nigh, extinguishing all the fire that was round about the sanctuary; and there they gave and received judgment, if any of them accused any of committing any transgression. And when they had given their judgment, when they were light, they were given a golden tablet, and they dedicated them together with their robes as memorials. And there were many other special laws concerning the peculiar rights of the many princes, of which the most important were these: that they should never take up arms against one another, and that they should all lend help, taking counsel in common, like their forerunners, about their politics in war and other matters, while conceding their leadership to the royal branch of Atlas; and that the king had no authority to put to death any of his brother-princes save with the consent of more than half of the ten.

Plato mentions that the story of Atlantis was heard by Solon in Egypt, and transmitted orally over several generations through the family of Dropides (Drop-ides / Dr-opides) until he reached Critias, a dialogue speaker in Timaeus and Critias.

Plato himself was also of Celtic / Druidic / Kop Sida) ancestry.

The deities of the old divided the land so that each deity might have their lot; Poseidon (Ler / Dagda) was appropriately and, to his liking, bequeathed the island of Atlantis.

Before the time of Atlantis, the deities came from Australia and before that from Antarctica.

Antarctica (South Pole) was once tropical.

The Pleistocene often colloquially referred to as the Ice Age is the geological epoch which lasted from about 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago.

New Guinea and Tasmania were joined to the continent of Australia. 

Australia and New Guinea formed a single landmass (known as Sahul), connected by an extensive land bridge over the Arafura Sea, the Gulf of Carpentaria and Torres Strait. 

The Australian aboriginals and the New Guineans are not the Tuatha Dé Danann.

The Holy One's (Kopsidas / Aravani) descended from Antarctica and not out of Africa.

Poseidon (Ler / Dagda) had settled the children (Children of Lir) he had been born of a mortal woman in the region of the Atlantis Island (Tir na nÓg).

Atlas

/ Atlantis / Karya / karyatides (Ancient Greek: Atlas of Atlas), "island of Atlas", is the Hellenic name for Bodb Der / Bodb Sida and Femen ('

/ Karyatid (Bodb Derg / Bodb Sidi ar Femen, 'from the mound of Femen,') (Atlas / Karyatid (Bodb Derg / Tír na nÓg) was the firstborn son of Poseidon (Ler / Dagda) and Cleito. 

Atlas / Karyatid was forced to hold the celestial spheres, not a globe on his shoulders.

All objects in the observer's sky can be conceived as projected on the inner surface of the celestial sphere as if they were the underside of a dome or a hemispherical screen.

The Atlas / Karyatid (Bodb Derg / Bodb Sidi ar Femen / Kop Sida) became the king of the whole island of Atlantis.

Rings of water and earth protected the mother and the divine child (Atlas / Karya / Bodb Derg / Bodb Sidi ar Femen / Kop Sida) on the island of Atlantis, Tir nóg.

To make the hill impregnable Poseidon (Ler / Dagda) carved out of the island circular belts of sea and land enclosing one another alternately.

It had fertile central plains with a central hill, surrounded by rings of sea and land, which were created by Poseidon (Ler / Dagda / Kop Sida) to protect its people (Kop idas / Aravani).

In the center of the hill (Kop) Poseidon (Ler / Dagda) brought up two springs, one well flowing hot and the other well-flowing cold.  

The island of Atlantis / Karya (Tir na nóg) was mountainous (kick) and rose straight from the sea (Kop-sea-da).

Poseidon (Ler) bridged across the circles of the sea, which surrounded the ancient metropolis of Atlantis, making a road from the Royal Palace.

Surrounding the royal palace was the sacred cave of Poseidon which contained trees of all kinds.

In the center of the Island there was a race course for horses and equestrian contests.

Build on the island were barracks for the spearmen who protected the island and the king.

The law was handed down and inscribed on a pillar (Kop) which was placed in a temple in the center of the island.

Also inscribed on the pillar was an oath that invoked curses on those who disobeyed.

In the sacred precincts, there were bulls at large who were sacrificed over the pillar with the blood of the bull running down the inscription.

Poseidon (Ler / Dagda) begat five pairs of twin sons and reared them up (Children of Lir). 

A large family of distinguished sons emerged from the Atlas (Bodb Derg), where the eldest as king always passed on the scepter to the eldest of his sons and thus preserved the sovereignty of many generations. 

A definition of the word atlas, noun: atlas; plural noun: atlases; noun: atlas vertebra; plural noun: atlas vertebrae; plural noun: atlas vertebras; plural noun: Atlantes.

  1. A book of maps or charts.
  2. Anatomy, the topmost vertebra of the backbone, articulating with the occipital bone of the skull. In the anatomy, the atlas (C1) is the most superior (first) cervical vertebra of the spine (Osiris). It is named for the Atlas of Greek Mythology because it supports the globe of the head.
  3. Architecture, a stone carving of a male figure used as a column to support the entablature of a Greek or Greek-style building.

In the classical European architecture, an atlas (also known as atlant, or atlantid or atlantid (atlant-id)) is a support sculpted in the form of a man, which can take the place of a column a pilaster (Djed / Banebdjedet / Kop Sida).

the Caryatid / Karyatid / Karyatida (Djed / Banebdjedet / Kop Sida) is the female version of this architectural form, ie, a woman standing in the place of each column or pillar found at the treasuries at Delphi and the Erechtheion on the Acropolis at Athens for Athena (Nieth / Brigid / Danu / Poseidon / Demeter / Isis / Virgin Mary).

Similar architectural figures already had been made in ancient Egypt out of monoliths.

Caryatids (Karyatids) were used for the entrance of the State Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia, which was built for Tsar Nicholas I of Russia.

Examples of Atlantes / Caryatids / Karyatids / Djed / Banebdjedet / Kop Sida are seen at:

  1. (Karyatida) Bronze mirror stand, circa 460 BC, Archaeological Museum of Lefkada. 
  2. Basilica di Santa Croce, Lecce, Italy. The Basilica of Santa Croce (Italian Church) is a Baroque church in Lecce, Apulia, Italy, completed in 1695.
  3. Casa degli Omenoni, Milan, Italy
  4. Church of St. Georg, Hamburg, Germany
  5. Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg Petersburg, Russia
  6. House in Kanałowa Str. 17, Poznań, Poland
  7. Palazzo Davia Bargellini, Bologna, Italy
  8. Pavilion Vendôme, Aix-en-Provence, France
  9. Porta Nuova, Palermo, Italy
  10. Sanssouci, Potsdam, Germany
  11. Sunshine Marketplace, Victoria, Australia
  12. Temple of Olympian Zeus, Valle dei Templi, Agrigento, Italy
  13. Zwinger Palace, Germany
  14. Caryatids in front of the Austrian Parliament building

The annual festivities in ancient Karyai included women dancing with baskets on their heads.

The male counterpart of Karyatides is the Atlanteans (Kopsidas / Aravani).

Crantor was an ancient Hellenic philosopher of the Old Academy, born in the middle of the 4th century BC, at Soli in Cilicia and died 276/5 BC.

Cilicia extended along the Mediterranean coast east from Pamphylia to the Nur Mountains, which separated it from Syria.

North and east of Cilicia lies the rugged Taurus Mountains, which separated it from the high central plateau of Anatolia,

Crantor traveled to Sais, Egypt, and saw there in the temple of Neith (Athena / Brigid) and column (Kop) hieroglyphs, on which the history of Atlantis was recorded.

Egyptian scholars translated the hieroglyphs for Crantor.

Crantor testified that the Egyptian account of Atlantis was fully agreed with Plato's account of Atlantis.

In Greek mythology, Cleito was the daughter of Evenor and Leucippe,

Leucippe, Ancient Greek: Leukippi means "white horse." (Pegasus / Kop-sidas / Aravani)

Ancient Egyptian priests used the epithet Shu (Atlas / Karya) for the divine child of Atlantis.

In Egyptian Shu means "he who rises" (Ye-Shu-a).

Fog and clouds were also Shu's (Atlas / Ben side / Bodb Derg / Bodb Sida / Kop Sida) elements, and they were often called his bones.


ETYMOLOGY OF THE WORD KARYATID.


Atlas and Karyatid have one and the same.

The etymology of the word Karyatid, Karya + t + id. (for the etymology of the word Karya see the etymology of the word karya above)

  • The etymology of the word "t" used to form the word Karya + t + id. English, Abbreviation, transgender (TG) or transsexual (TS) (used in contrast to cisgender M or F). English T, Abbreviation, Tuesday / March / Horus. Translingual, Letter, t lower case (upper case T) Usage notes 1. As a symbol meaning "time", it is italicized in print; for example, the position at time t is x. " X marks the spot.
  • The etymology of the word X is English, From Christ by abbreviation, from Ancient Greek Χ (Kh, "(letter chi)"), from Christ (Khristós, "Christ"). X, Adjective 1. Intersex or non-binary, hermaphroditism.  
  • Etymology 2. X, In Plato's Timaeus, it is explained that the two bands that form the "world soul" (anima mundi) cross each other like the letter Xi, possibly referring to the ecliptic crossing the celestial equator. The celestial equator is the great circle of the imaginary celestial sphere on the same plane as the equator of Earth. Justin Martyr in the 2nd century makes explicit reference to Plato's image in Timaeus in terms of a prefiguration of the Holy Cross. and an early testimony may be the phrase in Didache, "sign of extension in heaven" (sēmeion epektaseōs en ouranōi).
  • Noun t, (programming) (LISP) The atom representing true, as opposed to nil. 
  • (For the etymology of the id that forms the word Karya + t + id see Danu above).


Cause and effect is an important topic in all schools of Vedanta. 

Vedanta is one of the six orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy. 

Vedanta literally means "the end of the Vedas."

These concepts are discussed in ancient and medieval texts of Hinduism and other Indian religions, using synonymous terms. Cause is referred to as kāraṇa (कारण), nidana (निदान), hetu (हेतु) or mulam (मूलम्), while the effect is referred to as kārya (कार्य), phala (फल), parinam (परिणाम), or Shungam .

kārya-kāraṇa ananyatva. Advaita states that the effect (kārya) is non-different from the cause (kāraṇa), but the cause is different from the effect: kārya is not different from kāraṇa; however, kāraṇa is different from kārya. This principle is called kārya-kāraṇa ananyatva.

Karya is the work done. The person who does the Karya (doer) is called Karter. Karya is what happens when the Karter with a predetermined work consciousness seriously indulges in his accomplishment.  

(Karaa -Karan Siddhanta ) Karya-Karan Siddhanta Karya-Karan Siddhanta Karya-Karan Siddhanta Karya-Karan Siddhanta Karya-Karan Siddhanta Karya-Karan Siddhanta Karya-Karan Siddhanta Karya and Karana are called Karya Karana Siddanta (Sidda-nta), and

Karya is also one of the Hamadryades (a group of Dryad nymphs (Sidas) in the forest near Oxylosis.) 

A Hamadryad is a being that lives in trees ) 

They are a particular type of dryad, which is a particular type of nymph. 

A dryad is a tree (copse) nymph (sida) or tree spirit in Greek folklore. 

Drys signifies "oak" / Kop in Greek, and dryads are specifically the nymphs (Sidas) of oak trees, but the term has come to be used for all tree nymphs in general (Kop Sida).

They were normally considered to be very shy except around the goddess Artemis, who was known to be a friend of most nymphs.

The dryads of ash trees were called the Meliae.

The ash-tree sisters tended the infant Zeus in Rhea's Cretan cave.

Gaea (DemeterPoseidon / Danu / Brigid / Kop Sida) gave birth to the Meliae after being made fertile by the blood of castrated Uranus. 

The Epimeliad were nymphs associated with apple trees, and the Caryatids (Karyatids) were associated with walnut trees.

Hamadryads are born bound to a certain tree.

Some believe that hamadryads are the actual tree, while normal dryads are simply the entities, or spirits (souls / sidas), of the trees.

If the tree died, the hamadryad associated with it died as well.

For this reason, dryads and the gods have been punished with any mortals who have harmed the trees (Copseidas).

A list of the eight hamadryads, the daughters of Oxylus and Hamadryas:

  • Karya (walnut or hazelnut)
  • Balanos (oak)
  • Kraneia (dogwood)
  • Morea (mulberry)
  • Aigeiros (black poplar)
  • Ptelea (elm)
  • Ampelos (vines, especially Vitis)
  • Syke (fig)










POSEIDON

Blue haired Poseidon, God of the sea-blue mane. 

The etymology of the word Poseidon, Posei + don.

  • Etymology 1. Posei, Spanish, Verb, poseí 1. First-person singular (yo) indicative form of poseer.
  • The etymology of the word yo is English, From Middle English yo, yo, yêo, yeo, yaw, variant forms ya (Yah), ye ("yes, yea"), from Old English ġēa , from Proto-Germanic * ja ("yes"), from Proto-Indo-European * yē ("already"); or perhaps from Old English ēow ("Wo !, Alas!", Interjection). Compare Danish, Swedish, Norwegian jo ("yes"), Flemish jow ("hi, hey") and Dutch jo ("hi, hey"). More at yea, ow, ew.
  • The etymology of the word ya, English, Alternative forms: yaa, yaw, yah.
  • The etymology of the word yah. The name for the Egyptian deity Khonsu. Khonsu is referred to as Iah in Egyptian. Iah transliterated as Yah, Jah, Jah (w) ie Yahweh. Yah simply means the moon
  • Etymology 3rd ya, Malay, Noun yah 1. Father, Synonyms, rama.
  • The etymology of the word rama is Galician, Noun, rama f (plural ramas) 1. branch (of a tree).
  • Etymology 2nd Rama, Romansch, From a Germanic language (compare German Rahmen). Noun, rama m (plural ramas), Alternative forms, (Puter) ram.
  • Rama or Ram, also known as Ramachandra, is a major deity of Hinduism. He is the seventh avatar of the god Vishnu, one of his most popular incarnations along with Krishna and Gautama Buddha. In Rama-centric traditions of Hinduism, he is considered the Supreme Being.
  • Etymology 2. ya, Malay, Noun yah 1. father (male parent).
  • Eythmology 3. ya, Navajo, Compare Carrier yoh ("house").
  • The etymology of the word io is English, Modern Latin, from Ancient Greek io (iṓ, "Io"). English, Proper noun Io.
  1. Io, (Greek mythology) The daughter of Inachus river god, and a lover of Zeus, turned by the latter into a heifer.
  2. (astronomy) A moon of Jupiter, known for its volcanic activity, peppered with about 400 active volcanoes.
  3. (astronomy) 85 Io, a main belt asteroid; the asteroid shares its name with the Jovian moon. Derived terms Ionian.
  • The etymology of the word Ionian, From Ionia, from Io, Adjective Ionian (not comparable)
  1. Relating to the Hellenic people of that name.
  2. Ionic, of Ionia, the ancient (ca 1100 BC) region including western Asia Minor and the adjacent Aegean Islands occupied by the Ionian people.
  3. Relating to Io, one of the moons of the planet Jupiter.
  4. Related terms Ionian Islands.
  • The etymology of the words Ionian Islands, English, Proper noun Ionian Islands.
  1. A group of islands in the Ionian Sea - one of the 13 peripheries of Greece. The main islands are Corfu, Ithaca, Kefallonia, Kythira, Lefkada, Paxoi and Zante.
  • Etymology 2. Io, Noun io 1. A type of moth, the io moth.
  • Etymology 3. Io, Italian, From Old Italian eo, from Vulgar Latin * eo, from Latin ego ("I"), from Proto-Italic * egō, from Proto-Indo-European * éH2. Near cognates include French (Jesus), Portuguese eu, Romanian eu, and Spanish yo.
  • Etymology 2. yo, Lower Tanana, Noun yo 1. sky.
  • Etymology 3. yo, Noone, Noun yo 1. snake.
  • Etymology 4. yo, Norman, From Old French yaue, ewe, euwe, egua ("water"), from Latin aqua ("water"), from Proto-Indo-European * h₂ekʷeh₂.
  • The etymology of the word poseer, Spanish, From Latin possidēre, present active infinitive of possideō.
  • The etymology of the word possideō, from potis ("able") + sedeō ("sit").
  • The etymology of the word possideō is Latin, From potis + sedeō.
  • The etymology of the word potis, From Proto-Indo-European * pótis ("owner, master, host, husband"). Cognate with Ancient Greek drinking (pósis), Sanskrit पति (foti).
  • The etymology of the word पति (pašti), Sanskrit, Noun पति
  1.  husband.
  2.  lord, master.
  3.  master, owner, possessor, lord, ruler, sovereign.
  4.  root.
  • Descendants of Kannada: ಪತಿ (pati)
  • References: Potis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • potis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers.
  • potis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latina-Français, Hachette.
  • Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar for Schools and Colleges founded on comparative grammar, 1903, p. 54: "Potis is often used as an indeclinable adjective, but sometimes has in the neuter."
  • Varro on the Latin language with English translation by Roland G. Kent. In two volumes, I, books V.-VII., 1938, page 54-55, containing Marcus Terentius Varro's de lingual Latin V, X, 58:
  • Terra enim et Caelum, who is a magistrate, is a magician, and he is a quintessential multimillion nomic, non-qua non of the anthracite of the species of the species of the magician, 3 neque ut volgus putat, hi Samothraces dii, qui Castor et Pollux, which is the mask and femina et hi quos Augurum Libri scriptos habent sic "divi potes," 4 for illo quod Samothraces theorists.
  1. Laetus, for mothracum. 2 Laetus, for ambassadors. 3 Laetus, for pictures. 4 Laetus, for the diui qui potes. 5 Aug., for THESSE.
  • For the Earth and Sky, as the mysteries of the Samothraciansa teach, are Great Gods, and those whom I have mentioned under many names, are not those Great Gods whom Samothraceb represents by two male statues of bronze which she has set up before the city- gates, nor are they, as the population thinks, the Samothracian gods, c who are really Castor and Pollux; but these are a male and a female, these are those whom the Books of the Augursd mention in writing as "potent deities," for what the Samothracians call "powerful gods."
  •  and Mystic rites in Honor of the Cabiri. b An island in the north Aegean, off the coast of Thrace. c The Cabiri, popularly identified with Castor and Pollux, since they were all young male deities to whom protective powers were attributed. d Page 16 Regell.
  • The etymology of the word sedeo, Latin, From Proto-Italic * sedēō, from Proto-Indo-European * sed-, same root as sīdō. Cognates include Sanskrit सीदति (sīdati), Old Church Slavonic, Old English sittan (English sit). Confer sīdo ("I settle, I sink down"). Verb sedeō (present infinitive sedere, perfect active sēdī, supine sessum); second conjugation
  1. I sit, I'm seated.
  2. I sit in an official seat; sit in council or court, hold court, preside.
  3. I keep the field, remain encamped.
  4. I settle or sink down, subside.
  5. I sit still; remain, tarry, stay, abide, linger, loiter; sit around.
  6. I hold or hang fast or firm; I have established.
  7. Etymology 2. possideō, Latin, Verb possideō (present infinitive possidēre, perfect active possēdī, supine possessum); second conjugation.
  8. I have, hold, own, possess.
  9. I have land, have possessions.
  10. I take control or possession of, seize, occupy.
  11. I occupy, inhabit, abide.

The etymology of the word don was used to form the word posei + don.


  • The tribe of Dan (Dan / Tuath (a) Dé Danann) Donann and Domnann * don, meaning "earth."
  • Etymology 2. don, English, From Latin Dominus ("lord, head of household"), similar to Spanish don and Italian don; from domus ("house"). Compare domination. Noun don (dons) 1. A university professor, especially one at Oxford or Cambridge.
  • Etymology 3rd don, Bambara, Noun don 1. day.
  • Etymology of the word is English, from English to Old English dæġ ("day"), from Proto-Germanic * dagaz ("day"), from Proto-Indo-European * dʰegʷʰ- ). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Dai ("day"), West Frisian dei ("day"), Dutch dag ("day" , Norwegian and Danish dag ("day"), Icelandic dagur ("day"). Cognate also with Albanian djeg ("to burn"), Lithuanian degti ("to burn"), Tocharian A tsäk-, Russian ghetto ("to burn"), dёгот (djógot', tar, pitch) (daha, "heat"), दहति (dahati, "to burn"), Latin foveō ("to warm, keep warm, incubate") .. Latin diēs is a false cognate; it derives from Proto-Indo-European * dyew- ("to shine"). Noun day (plural days).
  1. Any period of 24 hours.
  2. A period from midnight to the following midnight.
  3. (astronomy) Rotational period of a planet (especially Earth).
  4. Part of a day between sunrise and sunset where one enjoys daylight.
  5. A specified time or period; time, considered with reference to the existence or prominence of a person or thing; age; time.
  6. A period of contention of a day or less.
  7. (US, meteorology) A 24-hour period starting at 6am or sunrise.
  • Antonyms: night. Homophone, knight.
  • The English Knight, English, From Middle English knight, knyght, books, from Old English cniht, cneht, cneoht ("boy, youth, servant, attendant, student, guild "), from Proto-Germanic * knehtaz (German knecht," servant "), German Knecht (" lad, servant " ), block of wood ', from Proto-Indo-European * gnegʰ-, from * gen-' to ball up, pinch , "compress". Synonyms, (chess piece): horse (informal) - oak. See also paladin, baronet.
  • Etymology Day 2, Kalasha, Verb day. 1. I am.
  • Etymology 3. day, Middle English, Alternative forms dai, dæi, dey, daify, dæȝ, dei.
  • The etymology of the word dai is English, (mainly North India, Pakistan, Bangladesh) A wet nurse; and the midwife. Anagrams AID, Adi, DIA, Dia, Ida, IAD, Ida, aid, dia-
  • The etymology of the word Ida, English, Short form of obsolete names beginning with Germanic "work", used for both sexes in medieval England. It was revived in the 19th century, partly mistaken for a Greek name, for the Mount Ida of classical mythology.
  • Etymology 2. Ida, From Ancient Greek Ἴδη (Ídē). Proper noun Ida 1. (Greek mythology) Name of two sacred mountains located in present day Turkey and Crete, also called Mount Ida. Derived terms.
  1. Ida County.
  2. Ida Grove.
  3. Idean.
  • In Greek mythology, two sacred mountains are called Mount Ida, the "Mountain of the Goddess": Mount Ida in Crete; and Mount Ida in the ancient Troad region of western Anatolia (modern-day Turkey), which was also known as the Phrygian Ida in classical antiquity and is the mountain that is mentioned in the Iliad of Homer and the Aeneid of Virgil. Both are associated with the mother goddess in the deepest layers of pre-Greek myth, in that Mount Ida in Anatolia was sacred to Cybele, who is sometimes called Mother Idaea ("Idaean Mother"), while Rhea, often identified with Cybele, put the infant Zeus nurse with Amaltheia at Mount Ida in Crete. Thereafter, his birthplace was sacred to Zeus, the king and the father of Greek gods and goddesses.
  • Etymology 2. Ida, From Ancient Greek Ἴδη (Ídē). Proper noun Ida 1. (Greek mythology) Name of two sacred mountains located in present day Turkey and Crete, also called Mount Ida. Derived terms.
  • Etymology 3. Ida, Proper noun Ida 1. A river in eastern Slovakia.
  • Etymology 4. Ida, German, Name of early female saints, shortened from compound given names beginning with Germanic element Ida-, Idu-. The meaning is debated, possibly cognate with the Old Norse ið ("work"). Since its renaissance in the 19th century also used as a diminutive of Adelaide.
  • Etymology 4th day, Tok Pisin, English die, Verb dai 1. To die.
  • Etymology Day 5, Middle English 1. daylight, sunlight
  • 2. epoch, age, period.
  • Etymology 4. Don, Breton, Adjective don 1. deep.
  • The etymology of the word deep is English, From Middle English Deep, Deep, Deep, Deep, Old English dēop ("deep, profound; awful, mysterious; heinous; serious, solemn, serious, -Germanic * deupaz ("deep"), from Proto-Indo-European * dʰewb- ("deep"). Cognate with Scots depe (deep), Saterland Frisian djoop (deep), West Frisian djip (deep), Dutch deep (German deep) ), Danish dyb ("deep"), Norwegian Bokmål dyp ("deep"), Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish djup (deep), Lithuanian oak (deep, hollow) det ("sea"), Welsh dwfn ("deep").
  • The etymology of the word sea, Old Swedish, Alternative forms sīa. Sia or Saa, an ancient Egyptian god, was the deification of perception in the Heliopolitan Ennead cosmogony and is probably equivalent to the intellectual energies of the heart of Ptah in the Memphite cosmogeny. He also had a connection with writing and was often shown in an antropomorphic form holding a papyrus scroll. This papyrus was thought to embody intellectual achievements.
  • Etymology 2. sea, From Middle English see, from Old English sǣ ("sea, lake"), from Proto-Germanic * saiwiz (probably from either Frisian see, Dutch zee, Proto-Indo-European * sh2ey-ulong- to be fierce, afflict '(Latvian sievs, sīvs ("sharp, biting"); at sore) [1] or derived from * sīhwaną ("to perlate, filter"), in which case * saiwiz is from earlier * saigwiz, Pre-Germanic * soyk πόρων.
  • The etymology of the word see, English, From Middle English seen, from Old English sēon ("to see, look, behold, perceive, observe, discern, understand, know"), from Proto- ), from Proto-Indo-European * secʷ- ("to see, notice"). Cognate with West Frisian sjen, Dutch zien ("to see"), Low German sehn, German sehen ("to see"), Danish, Swedish and Norwegian Bokmål ("to see"), Norwegian Nynorsk sjå ("to see"), and more distantly with Latin sīgnum ("sign, token"), Albanian shih ("look at, see") imperative of shoh.
  • Etymology 2. See, From Middle English, See, from Old French Sie ("seat, throne, town, capital, episcopal see"), from the Latin seat ("seat"), referring to the bishop's throne or chair of power) in the cathedral; related to the Latin verb sit ("to sit"). Noun see (sees).
  • A diocese, archdiocese; and a region of a church, generally headed by a bishop, especially an archbishop.
  • The office of a bishop or archbishop; bishopric or archbishopric. 
  1. Derived terms-Holy See. See also:
  1. cathedrc.
  2. cathedral.
  3. chair.
  4. throne.
  5. A seat; a site; and place where sovereign power is exercised.
  • Etymology 3. see, Middle English, Noun see (sees)
  1. seat, chair.
  2. dwelling, residence.
  3. A royal or episcopal chair.
  4. A royal or episcopal polity or realm.
  5. A royal or episcopal residence.
  6. (The Christianity) The Kingdom of Heaven.
  • Etymology 4. see, 1. sea, ocean 2. A body of water, a lake.
  • Etymology 5. Czech, borrowed from Spanish don, which is from Latin dominus ("lord").
  1. (in Italian environment) Originally a title of Honor of the Pope, later used for all priests and later for aristocrats.
  2. Spanish noble title. [19th c.] Related term Donate.
  • The etymology of the word dona is Portuguese, From Old Portuguese dona, From Latina domina, from Latin domina, Noun dona f donas)
  1. feminine equivalent of dono.
  2. lady (woman of breeding and authority)
  • Etymology 2. dona, Czech, Borrowed from Italian donna. Noun dona f.
  1. Italian noble woman, lady, originally a noble title
  • The etymology of the word donna, Italian, From Late Latin, a shortened version of the Latin domina ("lady, mistress of an estate or household"), from dominus ("home").
  • Noun donna f (plural donne)
  1. woman.
  2. lady (archaic)
  3. wife.
  4. (card games, chess) queen.
  5. actress
  • Synonyms:
  1. (lady): signora, dama.
  2. (wife): moglie.
  3. Queen: Queen.
  4. (actress): attrice
  • Related terms madonna.
  • The etymology of the word madonna, English, From Italian madonna, from Old Italian ma ("my") + donna ("lady"). The given name is derived from the English term, not used as a given name in Italy. Proper noun Madonna 1. The Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus. See also Madonna lily.
  • Madonna lily, English, Madonna lily (Madonna lilies)
  1. Lilium candidum, a true lily native to Greece, the Western Balkans and the Middle East. Unlike other lilies, it has a basal rosette of leaves through the winter, which die back in summer.
  • Etymology 5. don, Italian, From a shortening of an earlier donno, from dom'no (used by Dante), from Latin domnus <dominus. Noun don m (inv) 1. Father (a title given to priests).
  • The etymology of the word Father, English, Alternative forms Fr. (title given to priests). Proper noun Father
  1. (Christianity) God, the father of Creation.
  2. A title given to the priests.
  3. One of the chief ecclesiastical authorities of the first centuries after Christ. The Latin, Greek, or apostolic Fathers.
  4. One's father.
  5. (Wicca) One of the triune gods of the Horned God in Wicca, representing a man, younger than the older Sage and older than the boyish Master. 
  • The etymology of the word triune, English, From tri- + Latin unus ("one"). Adjective triune (not comparable)
  1. Threefold, having three components that are both separate and united; said especially of the Trinity of Christian Doctrine.
  • The etymology of the word Trinity, English, From Old French trinite (from Trinity, Trinity, Trinity, trinitiet, trinitet), from the trinitāte, the triumph of the Trīnītās (from "triple"), from trēs, from Proto-Italic * trēs, from Proto-Indo-European * tréyes ("three") + Proto-Indo-European * -teh-2ts ("suffix forming nouns indicating a state of being")). Proper noun Trinity.
  1. Christianity) In Christian belief, the three persons (personae) of the Godhead: Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
  2. The Anthony of the Father is Mother.
  • The etymology of the word Mother. Proper noun Mother
  1. (dated) One's mother.
  2. A title given to a nun or a priestess.
  3. (Wicca) One of the triune goddesses of the Lady in Wicca alongside the Crone and Maiden and representing a woman older than a girlish Maiden but younger than an aged Crone. 
  • The etymology of the word nun, English, From Old English nunne ("nun, priestess"), from Late Latin nonna ("nun, tutor"), originally for elderly people, perhaps from children's speech, reminiscent of nana, like papa etc. Doublet of nonna. Noun nun (plural nuns)
  1. A member of a Christian religious community of women who live by certain vows and usually wear a habit (Roman Catholicism, specifically) those living together in a cloister.
  2. (by extension) A member of a similar female community in other confessions.
  3. (archaic, British slang) A prostitute.
  4. A kind of pigeon (Columbidae) with the feathers on his head like the hood of a nun.
  • Etymology 2nd nun, Ultimately from Proto-Semitic * nūn- ("fish"). Alternative forms of noon.
  • The etymology of the word noon, From Middle English noen, none, from Old English nōn ("the ninth hour"), from a Germanic borrowing of classical Latin nōna ("ninth hour"), feminine of nōnus ("ninth"). Cognate with Dutch noen, obsolete German Non, Norwegian non. Noun noon (countless and uncountable, plural noons)
  1. (obsolete) The ninth hour of the day counts from sunrise; around three o'clock in the afternoon.
  2. Time of day when the sun is in its zenith; twelve o'clock in the day, midday.
  3. (obsolete) The corresponding time in the middle of the night; midnight.
  4. (figuratively) The highest point; culmination. 
  • Etymology 2nd noon, Arapaho, Noun noon 1st egg.
  • Etymology 3rd Nun, Nun, also spelled No, the oldest of the ancient Egyptian gods and father of Re, the sun god. Nun's name means "primitive waters," and he represented the waters of chaos out of which Re-Atum began creation. Nun's qualities were boundlessness, darkness, and the turbulence of stormy waters; these qualities were personified separately by pairs of deities. Nun, his female counterpart, Naunet, and three further pairs together formed the Ogdoad (group of eight gods) of Hermopolis. Various Egyptian creation myths retain the image of the emergence of a primitive hillock formed of mud churned from the chaotic waters of Nun. Since it was believed that the primeval ocean continued to surround the ordered cosmos, the creation myth was reenacted every day as the sun god rose from the waters of chaos.
  • Etymology 2. Synonyms of Goddess.
  • The etymology of the word Goddess, From Middle English, from Old English. See God for further etymology. Proper noun goddess
  1. The single goddess of various monotheistic religions
  2. The single goddess of various bitheistic or duotheistic religions.
  3. (Wicca) The Lady, the main deity in Wicca.







DEMETER

Blond haired Demeter. 


The etymology of Demeter, De + meter.


  • Etymology 1st de, Asturian, From Latin dē.
  • Preposition of 1st of, from.
  • Etymology 2. de, Burarra, Noun del
  1. pearl falcon, brown falcon
  2. Australian chestnut
  3. spotted harrier, swamp harrier
  • The etymology of the word del, Volapük, Noun del (dels) 1. day (for the etymology of the word day see above).
  • Etymology 2. de, Fala, Contractions: de + as: das. (for the etymology of the word das see kopsidas)
  • Etymology 3.de, Faroese, See also (Latin-script letter names) bókstavur; a / fyrra a, á, be, de, edd, eff, ge, há, i / fyrra i, fyrra, jodd, ka, ell, emm, , te, u, ú, se, seinna, seinna, seinna a.
  • The etymology of the word kā, noun (in ancient Egypt) the spiritual part of an individual human being or god, which survived after death and could reside in a statue of the person. See also ba.
  • Etymology 4. de, Related terms 1. da ("by") 2. da ("by") 
  • da = "Earth-Mother".  
  • Etymology 4th, Haitian Creole, From French deux ("two").
  • Etymology 5. de, Latin, Usage notes, Dē denotes the going out, departure, removal, or separating of an object from any fixed point (it occupies a middle place between ab (“away from”) which denotes a mere external departure, and ex (“out of”) which signifies from the interior of a thing. Hence verbs compounded with dē are constructed not only with dē, but quite as frequently with ab and ex; and, on the other hand, those compounded with ab and ex often have the terminus a quo indicated by dē.
  • The etymology of the word ex, English, Noun ex (plural exes) 1. The name of the Latin-script letter X/x.
  • The etymology of the word X is English, From Christ by abbreviation, from Ancient Greek Χ ‎(Kh, “(letter chi)”), from Χριστός ‎(Khristós, “Christ”). X, Adjective 1. Intersex or non-binary, hermaphroditism.
  • In Plato's Timaeus, the letter x (chi) is explained that the two bands that form the soul of the world cross each other like the letter Χ. 
  • Etymology 2. ex, Middle English, Noun ex. 1. Alternative form of ax (“axe”).
  • Etymology  6. de, Low German, From Middle Low German dê, from Old Saxon thē. Article de pl (genitive der, dative den, accusative de, definite article) 1. the
  • The etymology of the word den, English, From Middle English den, from Old English denn (“den, lair (of a beast), cave; a swine-pasture, a woodland pasture for swine”), from Proto-Germanic *danjō (“threshing-floor, barn-floor”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰen- (“flat surface, board, sheet, area, palm of the hand”). Cognate with Scots den (“den, lair”), Middle Dutch denne (“burrow, den, cave, attic”), Dutch den (“ship's deck, threshing-floor, mountain floor”), Middle Low German denne, danne (“threshing-floor, small dale”), German Tenne (“threshing-floor, barn for threshing”). Noun den (plural dens).
  1. A small cavern or hollow place in the side of a hill, or among rocks; especially, a cave used by a wild animal for shelter or concealment.
  2. A squalid or wretched place; a haunt.
  3. A comfortable room not used for formal entertaining.
  • (Britain, Scotland, obsolete) A narrow glen; a ravine; a dell.
  • Etymology 2. den, Bambara, Noun den.
  1. child
  2. fruit
  • Etymology 3. den, Breton, From Proto-Brythonic *dün, from Proto-Celtic *gdonyos (“human, person”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰéǵʰom-yo- (“earthling, human”), a derivation of *dʰéǵʰōm (“earth”). Noun den m
  1. human being
  2. person, man
  3.  husband
  • Etymology 4.den, Czech, From Proto-Slavic *dьnь (“day”). Noun den m inanimate.
  1. day (24 hours, usually from midnight to midnight)
  2. daytime (time between sunrise and sunset)
  3. (astronomy) day (rotational period of a body orbiting a star)
  • Etymology 5. Czech, Noun den.
  1. genitive plural of dna
  • Etymology Day 4, Dutch, From Middle Dutch dan, danne, daily ("pine tree"). Ultimately from Proto-Germanic * danwō-, * danjō- "pine tree". Cognate with German Tanne. 
  • The etymology of the word dan, English, Anagram DNA.
  • Etymology 2nd dan, Bambara, Verb, dan.
  1.  to count
  2.  to sow
  • The etymology of the word sow, English, From Middle English sowe, from Old English sugu, from Proto-Germanic * sugō (compare West Frisian, Dutch zeug, Low German Söög, Norwegian sugge, -Indo-European * suh2kéh2 (compare Welsh hwch ("pig"), Sanskrit सूकर (sūkará, "swine, boar")), from * suH- 'pig' ὗς (hûs), Albanian thi, Avestan 𐬵𐬏 (hū, "boar") See also swine. 
  • Etymology 2. sow, Verb sow (third-person singular simple present sows, present participle sowing, simple past sowed, past participle sown).
  1.  (transitive) To scatter, disperse, or plant (seeds).
  2.  (figuratively) To spread abroad; it propagate.
  3.  (figuratively) To scatter over; to besprinkle.
  • Etymology 3. Dan, Bambara, Verb dan 1. to pass beyond
  • Etymology 4. dan, Biem, Noun dan.
  1. water
  • Etymology 5. Dan, From Latin Dania ("Denmark"). 
  • Etymology 6. Dan, Dongxiang, Compare Bonan Dam, ultimately from Proto-Turkic * dām. Compare Turkish dam ("roof"), Uyghur تام (there, "wall"), Salar there, tām ("wall"). Noun, dan 1. wall. 
  • Etymology 7. Middle English, Noun dan.
  1.  don (for the etymology of the word do not see above Posei + don)
  • Etymology 8. Dan, Serbo-Croatian, From Proto-Slavic * dьnь ("day"). Noun m (Cyrillic spelling).
  1. day
  • Etymology 8. dan, Swedish, Noun dan
  1. Contraction of dagen, defined singular of dag (dag day / Dagda)
  • Etymology 9. Dan, Welsh, Verb dan.
  1. (colloquial, North Wales) First-person plural present of point. Synonyms ŷn (South Wales)
  • The etymology of the word ŷn, From Ancient Greek γε (gê) / γαΐα (gaïa). Noun earth • (gi) f (uncountable).
  1. world, earth (planet)
  2. world, earth (its people)
  3. earth, land, soil (in which plants grow)
  4. land (as seen by sailors)
  5. land, country. See also the planets of the Solar System, Ermis, Afrodíti, Earth, Aris, Días, Krónos, Ouranós, Poseidónas and Poseidon, .
  • Gaia, Gaia, "Gaea, the Earth personified as a goddess", from Gaia ("the Earth"), probably related to γ ​​(gê, "earth, land; country "). 
  • Dan. Dana (danu), modern Irish Dana [d̪ˠanˠə]) is the mother goddess of the Tuatha Dé Danann ("The people of the goddess Danu"). Although some of the Victorian sources are also associated with the land.
  • Etymology 7th, Romansch, From Latin diēs. Noun de m (plural des).
  1. (Surmiran) day
  • Etymology 8. de, Sranan Tongo, Verb de.
  1. That's right.
  • Etymology 9, de, Welsh, Contraction of Old Deau ("right; south"), from Proto-Celtic * dexsos ("right"). Cognate with Cornish dyhow, Breton dehou, Irish deas. The sense "south" comes from the fact that the south is on the right-hand side of a person facing east. Adjectives of (singular, plural).
  1. right (opposite of left)
  2. south, south.
  • (Derived terms)
  1. Môr y De ("the South Sea")
  2. Pegwn y De ("the South Pole").
  • Etymology 10. Xhosa, From Proto-Nguni * -de, from Proto-Bantu * -dàì.
  • Adjective-de
  1. tall
  • Etymology 11. de, Zande, Noun de
  1. woman, Pronoun of (old orthography of, Sawndip forms 他, 𬿇, 𭶼, 爹, 佚)
  2. she; it.

The etymology of the word meter used to form the word De + meter.


  • Etymology 1st meter, From French mètre, from Ancient Greek metron (metron, "measure"). 1 (mainly US, elsewhere meters) The base unit of length in the International System of Units (SI), conceived as 1/10000000 of the distance from the North Pole to the Equator, and now defined as the distance light will travel in a vacuum in 1/299792458 second. 
  • Etymology 2nd meter, Dutch, Noun meter f (plural meters, diminutive meterstje n)
  1. godmother

  • The etymology pf godmother, English, From Middle English Godmoder, from Old English Godmother (godmother), equivalent to god + mother. Cognate with Old High German, godmother, Old Norse guðmóðir ("godmother"), Icelandic guðmóður ("godmother"), Swedish gudmoder ("godmother"), Danish gudmor ("godmother"). 
  • Godmother = Demeter / Danu / Brigid / Virgin Mary / Athena / Ops / Cybele / Isis, etc.
  • Godfather = Poseidon / Elada / Osiris / Dagda, etc.
  • The Godmother and the Godfather are one and the same, Hermaphrodite.






Around 9600 BC (11,600 before present) and a sudden cataclysmic event changed the climate on Earth bringing ice age to a sudden end, (Meltwater pulse 1B).

Meltwater pulse 1B (MWP1b) is the name used by quaternary geologists, paleoclimatologists, and oceanographers for a period of either rapid or just accelerated post-glacial sea level rise that occurred at the beginning of the Holocene and after the end of the Younger Dryas.

The Holocene is the geological epoch that began after the Pleistocene at approximately 11,700 years before present.

The Younger Dryas is a climatic event from c. 12,900 to c. 11,700 years before present. 

From the melting ice came a great deluge.

Raging floodwaters submerged the island of Tir on nóg (Atlantis) which was surrounded by ice around 11,600 years ago.


The Tuatha De Danann (Atlanteans / Kop Sidas / Aravani) who survived the Great Flood came to settle in southeastern Anatolia.

The mountain (Kop) on which the ark rested after the Great Flood was one of the Gordiean mountains separating Armenia with Kurdistan, ancient Assyria, present-day eastern Turkey.

Gordyan (Gordiean) is the ancient name of the region of Bohtan (now Şırnak Province).

The Gordian mountains are the place where the Ark came to rest after the Great Flood, not on the Mountains of Ararat.


Just after the Great Flood, at the foot of one of the Gordian mountains, Tuatha Dé Danann (Atlanteans / Kop Sidas / Aravani) founded a village called Karya Thaminin, the Village (Karya) of the Eighty (Thaminin) the number (and not eight, Bible reference: Genesis 7:13) saved from the Great Flood around 11,600 years before present.


And of that divine race came forth my ancestors the Kopsidas and the Aravani ie Atlanteans (Tuatha Dé Danann).

And ever since those days we are the Inherent, Natural, and Legitimate heirs to the original royal line of kings, by Divine Right.





THE ETYMOLOGY OF THE WORD KARYA.


The etymology of the word Karya, Caria, Kar + ia, Car + ia, Ka + rya, Ka + r + ya, and Ka + ria, Kar + ia.




  • Etymology 1. karya, Malay, From Sanskrit कार्य (kārya, "deed").
  • From the Old English dēd, dǣd ("deed, act"), from Proto-Germanic * dēdiz ("deed"), from Proto-Indo-European * deed, action "). Analyzable through Proto-Germanic until + -th. Cognate with West Frisian died, Dutch daad ("deed, act"), German Low German Daad, German Tat ("deed, action"), Swedish, Norwegian and Danish dåd (act, action). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek (thésis, setting, arrangement). Noun, deed (plural deeds).
  1. An action or act; something that is done. 
  2. A brave or noteworthy action; to feat or exploit. 
  3. Action or fact, as opposed to rhetoric or deliberation.
  4. (law) A legal contract showing bond in the form of a document. 
  • Synonyms:

  1. (action): act, action
  2. (law): document, certificate, instrument.
  • Verb, deed (third-person singular simple present deeds, present participle deeding, simple past and past participle deeded).

  1. (informal) To transfer real property by deed. 

  • Etymology 2. Karya, Cebuano, Cebuanized form Caria. Proper noun Karya

  1. and a nickname for Macaria.
  • The etymology of the word Caria, From Ancient Greek Kᾱríᾱ (Kāríā). Proper noun Caria. 

  1. A historical region in the southwest corner of Asia Minor.
  • The etymology of the word Macaria and Ma + caria.
  • Etymology 1. Macaria, English, From Ancient Greek Makarios (literally "she who is blessed"). Proper noun, Macaria

  1. (Greek mythology) The goddess of the blessed dead, who goes to the Elysian Fields.
  2. (Greek mythology) A daughter of Heracles / Hercules.
  • Coordinate terms:

  1. Hecate
  2. Melinoe
  3. Mania
  • (Hekatós), an obscure epithet of Apollo, variously interpreted as "one who works / operates from afar", "one who drives off "," the far reaching one "or" the far-darter. "
  •  Hecate is often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in a triple form. 
  • Hecates symbols are paired torches, dogs, serpents, keys, poop, daggers, and Hecate's wheel.

  • Alternatively, some suggest that the name derives from the Ancient Greek word for "will". (see also: testament).
  • Proper noun Hecate

  1. The powerful goddess, in Greek mythology, of magic, crossroads, fire, light, the moon, and the underworld. Her Roman counterpart is Trivia.
  2. (astronomy) 100 Hekate, and the main belt asteroid.
  • Coordinate terms

  1. (Greco-Roman moon goddess): Trivia, Artemis / Diana, Selena / Luna, Theia, Phoebe, Pandia, the Menae
  2. (goddesses of the dead): Melinoe / Mania, Macaria, Persephone / Proserpina.
  • The Etymology of the Word, English, From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin Testamentum, from testor (" I am a witness, testify, attest, make a will "), from testis (" one who attests, a witness "). Noun testament (plural testaments)

  1. (law) A solemn, authentic instrument in writing, by which a person declares his or her will as the disposal of his / her inheritance (estate and effects) after his or her death, benefiting specified heir (s).
  2. One of the two parts to the scriptures of the Christian religion: the New Testament, considered by Christians to be the continuation of the Hebrew scriptures, and the Hebrew Scriptures themselves, which they refer to as the Old Testament.
  3. A tangible proof or tribute. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  4. A credo, expression of conviction.
  • Synonyms, (law): will, last will and testament, last will.
  • The etymology of the word Melinoe, English, From Ancient Greek. Proper noun Melinoe. 

  1. (Greek mythology) An obscure figure, a daughter of Persephone and Zeus. or a daughter of Hades and Persephone.
  • Hecate and the Erinyes, and the name is sometimes thought to be an epithet of Hecate. The terms in which Melinoë is described are typical of moon goddesses in Greek poetry. 
  • The etymology of the word Mania, Emglish, From Latin Mania, related to manes ("spirits of the dead"). Proper noun Mania

  1. (Roman mythology) The goddess of the dead and ghosts.

  • The etymology of the word Ma used to form the word Ma + caria.
  • Etymology 1. Ma, English, Abbreviation Ma

  1. May

  • Usage notes: Sometimes also written in lowercase as ma.
  • The etymology of the word May, English, From Middle English May, Mai, from Old French May, from Latin māius (Maia's month), from Maia, and Roman earth goddess, possibly from Proto-Indo-European * magya she who is great "), from Proto-Indo-European * mehhs (" great ")
  • Etymology 2. Ma, Transcription of 馬 / 马 (mǎ).
  • The etymology of the word 馬, Chinese, Pictogram (象形) - a horse with its head facing the left, showing a flowing mane in the wind. In the bronze inscriptions, the head was often simplified into an eye (目). The legs eventually evolved into four dots (灬, unrelated to 火).
  • 𢊁 (𢊁), which is a hybrid: it has the legs of 馬 (灬) but the head of 鹿. 
  • Etymology 3rd ma, English, Noun ma (plural mas)

  1. (astronomy, usually in the plural) Abbreviation of milli-arcsecond.

  • The etymology of the word mas, Noun mas (plural mas)

  1. (Caribbean) A type of traveling dramatic performance conducted as part of a parade celebrating Carnival, originating in Trinidad and Tobago and performed throughout the Caribbean.
  • Etymology 2nd mas, Albanian, From Proto-Albanian * matja, from * mh̥1ti̯-e-, from Proto-Indo-European * meh1- (compare Old English mǣd, Latin mētior).
  • Verb, mas (first-person singular past tense mata, participle matur)

  1. to measure.
  • The etymology of the word mētior, homonym meteor.
  • The etymology of the word meteor, noun: meteor; plural noun: meteors

  1. and a small body of matter from the outer space that enters the earth's atmosphere, becoming incandescent as a result of friction and appearing as a streak of light.
  • synonyms: falling star, shooting star, fireball, meteorite, bolide, meteoroid, comet.
  • Etymology 3rd mas, Catalan, Noun, mas m (plural masos)

  1. farmhouse, typical country house.
  • Etymology 4th Mas, Haitian Creole, From French mars ("March") Noun mas

  1. March.
  • In ancient Roman religion and myth, Mars (Latin: Mārs, [maːrs]) was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian, a combination characteristic of early Rome. Symbol, The spear of Mars. Greek equivalent, Ares.
  • Etymology 2nd mas, From French masse ("mass") Noun, mas

  1. mass.
  • The etymology of the word mass, English, In the late Middle English (circa 1400) and mass in the sense of "lump, quantity of matter", from the Anglo-Norman mass, in Old French attested from the 11th century, through late Latin massa ("Lump, dough"), from Ancient Greek masea ("barley-cake, lump (of dough)"). The Greek noun is derived from the verb masso ("mášō," to knead "), ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European * ma- (" to oil, fake "). The sense of "a great number or quantity" arises around 1580. The scientific sense is from 1687 (as Latin massa) in the works of Isaac Newton, with the first English use (as mass) occurring in 1704. 
  • Etymology 2. mass, English, From Middle English messe, masse, from Old English mæsse ("the mass, church festival") and Old French messe, from Vulgar Latin * messa, from Late Latin missa, noun use of feminine past participle of classical Latin mittere ("to send"), from ite, missa est ("go, (assembly) is dismissed"), last words of the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church. Compare Dutch mis ("mass"), German Messe ("mass"), Danish messe ("mass"), Icelandic messa ("mass"). More at mission. Noun mass (plural masses)

  1. (Christianity) The Eucharist, now especially in Roman Catholicism.
  2. (Christianity) Celebration of the Eucharist.
  3. (Christianity, usually as the Mass) The sacrament of the Eucharist.
  4. A musical setting of parts of the mass.
  • Etymology 3. Mass, English, From Middle English messe, from Old English mæsse and Old French messe, both from Late Latin missa, from Latin mittō ("to send, dismiss"), compare French messe. In the ancient churches, the public services at which the catechumens were allowed to be present were called missa catechumenorum, ending with the reading of the Gospel. Then they were dismissed with the words: "Ite, miss est", the congregation is dismissed. After that the sacrifice proper began. At her close the same words were told to those who remained. So the word gave the name of Mass to the sacrifice in the Catholic Church. Compare Christmas, Lammas, Mess and dish, missal. Doublet of missa. 
  • Noun Mass (countable and uncountable, plural Masses)

  1. (Roman Catholic Church) The main liturgical service of the Church, including a scripture service and an eucharistic service, which includes the consecration and offering of the host and wine.
  2. A similar ceremony offered by a number of Christian churches.
  3. (music) A musical composition set to portions of the Mass.
  • Etymology 4. mas, Latin, Noun, mās m (genitive maris); third declension

  1. and male, man.
  • Descendants: Romanian: great.
  • The Etymology of the Great Word, English, From Middle English sea, apple, from Old English mīere ("female horse, sea"), from Proto-Germanic * marhijō ("female horse" "Great"), North Frisian mar ("Great, Horse"), West Frisian merje (Great), Dutch merrie, Danish mær, Swedish märr meri ("big"), German Mähre ("decrepit old horse")), from * marhaz ("horse") (compare Old English mearh). Noun, sea (plural mares)

  1. An adult female horse.
  • Etymology 2nd Sea, Borrowed from Latin mare ("sea"). 
  • Anagrams: frames.
  • The etymology of the word rame, Italian, From Vulgar Latin * arame (n), from Latin Latin, derived from Latin aes ("copper"). 
  • Etymology 3rd Great, Albanian, Plurale tantum; plural of variant maré, from Latin marum ("cat thyme, kind of sage"). Noun, high f (defined singular margin).

  1. strawberry tree.
  • Etymology 4th Great, Catalan, From Old Occitan [Term?], From Latin māter, mātrem, from Proto-Italic * mātēr, from Proto-Indo-European * méh₂tēr. Noun, sea f (plural mares)

  1. mother.
  • Etymology 5. Sea, Corsican, From Latin sea. Noun mare m

  1. sea. (Derived Terms Holy See)
  • Etymology 6. Great, Danish, From Old Norse mara. Noun, sea c (singularly defined sea, plural indefinite marer)

  1. incubus, succubus.
  • Etymology 7. sea, Italian, Noun, sea m (plural large)

  1. sea.
  • See also: ocean ("ocean").
  • The etymology of the word oceano, Esperanto, From Latin ōceanus, from Ancient Greek Ὠкеanos (Ōkeanós, "Oceanus"). 
  • The etymology of the word Ὠкеanos, Ancient Greek, and a derivation from the non-attested Sumerian * A-ki-an (u) (Water of the Land and Heaven).
  • Proper noun, Ὠκεᾰνός • (Ōkeanós) m (genitive Ὠκεᾰνο); second declension

  1. Oceanus, and the Greek water god, usually said to be a Titan, one of the sons of Uranus and Gaia.
  2. The great freshwater river thought to encompass the world disc.
  3. The Great Saline Sea (Atlantic), as opposed to the Mediterranean.
  • Etymology 8th Sea, Neapolitan, From Latin Sea. Noun, sea

  1. sea ​​(a vast mass of salt water).
  • Etymology of the word "salty", German salzig ("salty"), German salzig ("saliva"), ). Adjective, salty (comparative saltier, superlative saltiest).
  1. Containing jump.
  • The etymology of the word salt, from the Middle English salt, from the Old English sealt, from the Proto-Germanic * saltą (from the Dutch-German salt), from Proto-Indo-European * seh2l- Welsh Halen, Old Irish Salann, Latin Sal, Russian Salt, Ancient Greek Hals, Albanian ngjelmë ("salty, savory"), Old Armenian Shrine, Tocharian A sāle, Sanskrit सलिल (salila) . 
  • Etymology 2nd Salt, Danish, From Old Norse Salt (Old Saxon Salt, Old Dutch Salt), from Proto-Germanic * saltą, from Proto-Indo-European * séh2l-, * séh₂ls. Compare Icelandic, Norwegian, and Swedish salt. 
  • The etymology of the word salt, anagram, atlas.
  • The etymology of the word atlas. Plato, the first king of Atlantis, was named Atlas, the son of Poseidon.
  •  "Atlantic Ocean" means "Sea of ​​Atlas", while "Atlantis" means "island of Atlas". 
  • The Pelasgians believed the creator goddess Eurynome assigned Atlas and Phoebe to govern the moon.
  • According to the ancient Greek poet Hesiod, Atlas stood at the ends of the earth towards the west.
  • Etymology 3. Salt, Friulian, From Catalan saltus. Noun, salt m (plural salts)

  1. jump, leap, spring.
  • The etymology of the word sol, Danish, sol, from the Old Norse sól ("sun"), from Proto-Germanic * sōwulą, * sōwulō ("sun"), from Proto-Indo-European * sóh2wl̥. Noun, sol c (singularly defined solen, plural indefinite sole)

  1. sun.
  • Etymology 2nd sol, Danish, sol, From Latin sol (in) in the hymn for St. John the Baptist. 
  • Etymology 3rd sol, French, Noun, sol m (plural sols)

  1. soil, earth
  2. ground
  3. floor
  • Etymology 4. sol, Galician, Noun, sol m (plural soles)

  1. sun
  2. sunlight
  3. sunny side (of a place)
  4. daylight (sunrise and sunset)
  • Etymology 5. sol, Old French, From Latin solus, sola. Alternative forms: soul.
  • The etymology of the word soul, From Middle English Soul, Sowle, Saule, sawle, from Old English sāwol ("soul, life, spirit, being"), from Proto-Germanic * saiwalō ("soul"). Cognate with Scots saul, soul (soul), North Frisian siel, soul (soul), Saterland Frisian Seele (soul) Seele ("soul") Scandinavian homonyms seem to have been borrowed from Old Saxon * siala. Modern Danish sjæl, Swedish själ, Norwegian sjel. Icelandic Hall may have come from Old English sāwol. Noun soul (countless and uncountable, plural souls)

  1. (religion, folklore) The spirit or essence of a person usually thought to consist of one's thoughts and personality. Often believed to live on after the person's death. 
  2. The spirit or essence of anything. 
  • The etymology of the world sal, Asturian, From Latin sāl, salem. Noun sal m (plural sales)

  1. jump.
  • The etymology of the word salem, Derived term, Jeru + salem.
  • Etymology 4th salt, Latvian, Verb, salt int., 1st conj., Pres. salty, salsti, salt, past salu

  1. to freeze.
  • Etymology 9. sea, Sonsorolese, Noun, sea

  1. boy.
  • Etymology of the 5th Mas, Rohingya, From Bengali মাছ (mach). Noun, mas

  1. fish.
  • Etymology 6. mas, Romani, Noun, mas m

  1. meat.
  • Etymology 7th Mas, Scottish Gaelic, Conjunction, mas

  1. if is

  • Usage notes: This is a shortened form of ma.
  • Etymology of the 8th Mas, Somali, Noun, Mas.

  1. snake.
  • Etymology 4th, English, Noun, ma (plural mas) (not commonly used in the plural).

  1. (colloquial, and in direct address) mother, mother.
  • See also pa.
  • pa is the Greek word for Ra (Pa) the Egyptian sun god.
  • The etymology of the word pa, English, Clipping of papa.
  • The etymology of the word papa, Catalan, From the Ecclesiastical Latin Papas, from Ancient Greek pope (tapas, "bishop, patriarch"), a variant of a papa ("páppas", "father"). Noun, papa m (plural papes)

  1. Pope

  • Related terms: papal.
  • Etymology 2. Papa, Italian, From Latin Papa, from Ancient Greek Pappas (Pappas). Noun, papa m (plural papi)

  1. Pope

  • Synonyms: pontefice.
  • Etymology 3rd papa. Latin, Noun, pāpa m (genitive pāpae); first declension

  1. father
  2. (ecclesiastical Latin) bishop
  3. (ecclesiastical Latin) The Pope (the Roman Catholic Bishop of Rome). 
  4. (ecclesiastical Latin) patriarch (in the firsttial sees, notably Coptic Alexandria).
  • Etymology 4. Papa, Malay, Noun, Papa

  1. father (male parent).
  • Synonyms

  1. bapa (bapanda, bapai, bapak, bapang, baba)
  2. ayah (ayahanda, aya, yah)
  3. abah (aba, bah)
  4. frame.
  • Etymology 5. papa, Pitjantjatjara, Noun, papa

  1. dog.
  • Semordnilap god.
  • Etymology 6. Papa, Quechua, Noun papa

  1. potato.
  • Etymology 7. papa, English, Noun, papa (plural papas).
  1. A parish priest in the Greek Orthodox Church. 
  • Etymology 5th, Alemannic German, Noun, ma

  1. (Gressoney, Issime) man.
  2. (Gressoney, Issime) husband.
  • Etymology 6. ma, Anaang, Verb, has

  1. to love.
  • Etymology 7. ma, Bambara, Noun, ma

  1. sea ​​cow.
  • The etymology of the word sea cow, English, sea cow (sea cows)

  1. Any of several marine mammals of the Sirenia order, including the manatee and dugong.
  • See also

  1. dolphin
  2. otter
  3. whale
  4. manatee
  • Etymology 8. ma, Catalan, Determiner ma

  1. female singular of mon.
  • Etymology 9. ma, Cimbrian, Noun, ma m

  1. (Thirteen Communities) moon.
  • Etymology 10. ma, Dorze, Noun, ma

  1. bee (insect).
  • Etymology 11. ma, Estonian, Pronoun
  • ma (genitive mu, partitive mind).
  • Etymology 12th, Finnish, From maanantai. Abbreviation, ma

  1. maanantai (Monday).
  • Etymology 13th, Ido, Borrowed from French mais, Italian ma, Spanish mas from Latin magis, from Proto-Indo-European * méthh2s. 
  • Synonyms: sed (archaic).
  • The etymology of the word sed, Latin, Alternative forms, set.
  • Set is a god of desert, storms, disorder, violence, and foreigners in ancient Egyptian religion.
  • Etymology 14. ma, Keoru-Ahia, Noun, ma

  1. water.
  • Etymology 15. ma, Maricopa, Noun, ma

  1. milk.
  • Etymology 16. ma, Middle English, Pronoun, ma

  1. Alternative form of man.
  • Etymology 17. ma, Old Frisian, Pronoun, ma

  1. one.
  • Etymology 17. ma, Pipil, Verb, -má

  1. Clipping of -maka. English, From Hawaiian maka, from Proto-Polynesian * mata, from Proto-Oceanic * mata, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian * mata, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian , from Proto-Austronesian * maCa. 
  • Anagrams: Kama, kama.
  • The etymology of the word Kama, From Sanskrit काम (kāma, "love"). Proper noun Kama

  1. (religion, Hinduism) The Hindu god of love, Kamadeva.
  • Etymology 2. -maka, Hawaiian, Noun, maka

  1. (anatomy) eye (organ)
  2. do it
  3. bud
  4. beloved one.
  • Etymology 18th, Veps, From Proto-Finnic * maa, from Proto-Uralic * mex. Noun, ma

  1. earth
  2. ground
  3. soil
  4. land, country, region
  5. states
  • Etymology 19. ma, Vietnamese, Sino-Vietnamese word from 魔. Noun (classifier con) ma

  1. (archaic) and demon
  2. (archaic) magic
  • Etymology 20th, Zhuang, From Proto-Tai * ʰmaːᴬ ("to come"). Cognate with Thai มา (maa), Northern Thai (ma), Lao ມາ (mā), Lü ᦙᦱ (maa), Tai Nüa ᥛᥣᥰ (maa2), Shan မႃး (ma) ).
  • Verb, ma (old orthography ma, Sawndip forms 庲,,, 麻, 駡)

  1. to come back; to return.
  • The etymology of the word Kar used to form the word Kar + ya,
  • Etymology 1. Kar, English, Noun, kar (plural kars)

  1. (marketing) Deliberate misspelling of car. 

  • The etymology of the word car, English, From Middle English carre, a borrowing from Anglo-Norman carre, from Latin carra, four-wheeled baggage wagon , from Gaulish * karros, from Proto-Celtic * karros ("wagon"), from Proto-Indo-European * ḱr̥sós, zero-grade form of * ers. 
  • See also: van.
  • The etymology of the word van, Noun, van (plural vans), Shortened form of caravan. 
  • The etymology of the word caravan, Etymology, From Middle French caravan, from Persian کاروان (kârvân), from Middle Persian k'lw'n '(kārawān), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European * ker- (" ) (whence Old English here). The word was used to designate a group of people who were traveling by camel or horse on the Silk Road. 
  • The etymology of the word کاروان, Kurdish, Noun کاروان • (karwan)

  1. caravan (a convoy or procession of passengers, their vehicles and cargo, and any pack animals).
  • The word Aravani derives from C + aravan + i.
  • Etymology 2. Persian, Alternative forms کاربان (kârbân), From Middle Persian k'lw'n '(kārawān, "caravan; military column"). Noun کاروان • (kârvân) plural کاروانها (kârvân-hâ))

  1. caravan
  2. convoy.
  • Derived terms:
  1. کاروانی (kârvâni)
  2. کاروانسرا (kârvânsarâ).
  • The etymology of the word کاروانسرا (kârvânsarâ), Noun, کاروانسرا • (kârvân-sarâ) کاروانسراها (kârvân-sarâ-hâ))

  1. caravanserai.
  • The etymology of the word caravanserai, English, Alternative forms caravansarai, caravansary. Borrowed from Persian کاروانسرای (kârvânserây), from کاروان (kārvān, "caravan") + سرای (sarāy, "courtyard; dwelling; palace"). Via latin chanis, from Latin, from Turkic * qan, contraction of * qaɣan. Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰴𐰍𐰣 (qaɣan), Mongolian ᠬᠠᠭᠠᠨ (qaɣan, "lord, prince"), and Turkic borrowing. 
  • Major urban caravanserais were built along the Grand Trunk Road in the Indian subcontinent, especially in the Mughal Delhi region. 
  • Synonyms khan.
  • The etymology of the word Khan, English, Old Middle English from Old French chan, from the Latin Latin chanis, from Turkic * qan, contraction of * qaɣan. Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰴𐰍𐰣 (qaɣan), Mongolian ᠬᠠᠭᠠᠨ (qaɣan, "lord, prince") (Cyrillic: haan).
  • The Palate Hill, one of the seven hills of Rome, where the aristocracy of the Roman Republic, from the Palatium Hill, comes from the Latin palatium, from the Palatium Hill, -And later, Roman emperors-built large, splendid residences. The name is ultimately either from Etruscan, the same source as Pales, or the Latin palus ("stake; enclosure"). Noun, palaces

  1. Official residence of a head of state or other dignitary, especially in a monarchical or imperial governmental system.
  2. A large and lavishly ornate residence. 
  3. A large, ornate public building used for entertainment or exhibitions.
  • Etymology 2. van, Danish, From Old Norse Vanr (plirir). Noun, van c (singular defined vanen, plural indefinite vaner)

  1. one of the Vanir.
  • The etymology of the word, Vanir, English, Borrowed from Old Norse Vanir, Proper noun, Vanir

  1. The main deities, as a group, of the Norse pantheon that represent chaos, fertility, and cultivation; opponents of the Æsir.
  2. Members of the Swedish royal family whose traditionally traced to one of the Vanir deities.
  • In Norse mythology, Vanir is a group of gods associated with fertility, wisdom, and the ability to see the future. The Vanir has one of two groups of gods (the other being the Æsir) and are the same name of the Vanaheimer (Old Norse "Home of the Vanir"). After the Æsir-Vanir War, Vanir became a subgroup of the Æsir. Subsequently, members of the Vanir are sometimes referred to as members of the Æsir. 
  • In Old Norse, Æsir, ǫss (or áss, ás, plural æsir; feminine ásynja, plural ásynjur) is a member of the principal pantheon in Norse religion. This pantheon includes Odin, Frigg, Thor, Baldr and Týr. The second pantheon is known as the Vanir. In Norse mythology, the two pantheons wage war against each other, resulting in a unified pantheon. 
  • Æsir is the plurality of the "god" (genitive case āsir), which is attested in other Germanic languages, eg, Old English ōs (Older Genesis), Old Dutch ans and Gothic (as reported by Jordanes, who wrote in the 6th century CE) anses "half-gods". These all stem from the Proto-Germanic * ansuz, which itself comes from the Proto-Indo-European * hensus (the genesis of life) (Avestan aŋhū lord; lifetime, ahura "godhood" force ", [4] the" demons "(* h2n̥suró), and it is widely accepted that this word is further related to * h2ens-" to engender "(Hittite hass-" to procreate, give birth, "Tocharian B ās - "to produce").

  • Old Norse has the genitive áss or asar, the accusative æsi and asu. In genitival compounds, it takes the form of asas, eg in Asa-Þórr ("Thor of the Æsir"), besides being found in the "gods' bridge" (the rainbow), ás-garðr, ás-kunnigr gods 'kin,' gods 'leader,' gods 'might' (especially of Thor), divine wrath etc. Landās "national god" (patrium numen) is a title of Thor, as is allmaty as "almighty god", while it is Odin who is "the" ás. 
  • The cognate Old English form is a ös, preserved only as a prefix Ós- in personal names (eg Oscar, Osborne, Oswald) and some place names, and as the genitive plural ēsa (ēsa gescot and ylfa gescot, "the shots of anses and of elves ", ie" elfshot ", jaculum divorum et geniorum).
  • The Prose Edda (Prose Ida), also known as the Younger Edda, Snorri's Edda, or, historically, simply as Edda (Ida), is an Old Norse work of literature written in Iceland

  • In chapter 6 of the Prose Edda (Prose Ida), poetic names for Njörðr are provided, including "descendant of Vanir or a Van". As reference, and a poem by the 11th century, Skald Þórðr Sjáreksson is provided where Njörðr is described as a Vanr. In Chapter 7, poetic names for Freyr are listed, including names that refer to his association with the Vanir; "Vanir god," "descendant of Vanir," and "and Van." Freyja is also repeatedly cited as Vanr. In chapter 20, some of Freyja's names are listed and include "Van-deity" and "Van-lady," and chapter 37 provides a skaldic verse referring to Freyja as "Van Bride" (In chapter 75, names for pigs have provided, including "Van-child." [(Piganisani).
  • Etymology 1. ka is From Egyptian k3. Noun ka (plural kas), A spiritual part of the soul that survived after death in the ancient Egyptian religion. Siddha ("great thinker / wise man", Sanskrit, "perfected one") is a term that is widely used in Indian religions and culture. It means "one who is accomplished". It refers to perfected masters who have achieved a high degree of physical as well as spiritual perfection or enlightenment. In Jainism, the term Siddha (Sida) is used to refer to liberated souls (Sida)
  • The etymology of the word yra used to form the word Ka + yra is English, from Finnish ryijy and its source, Swedish rya ("cloth").
  • The etymology of the word r used to form the word Ka + r + ya is from Turkmen, Letter r (upper case R). See also (Latin script letters) harp. 
  • The etymology of the word harp is the English, Noun, harp (plural harps) 1. (music) A musical instrument consisting of a body and a curved